Merton

  

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Kingston Road

The main road to London, built up by the time of Rocque's map, but only a few older buildings remain. The mediocre redevelopment has been redeemed a little by recent housing schemes

Former Merton Council Offices.  Built for Merton Parish Council in 1903. This two storeyed red brick building was enlarged in 1911 and again in 1930. Becoming Merton and Morden Central Library soon after but is no longer in municipal use

High Street

The main road to London, built up by the time of Rocque's map, but only a few older buildings remain. The mediocre redevelopment has been redeemed a little by recent housing schemes

Spread Eagle

18 King's Head

55 Rose and Crown.  The pub name symbolises the union of York and Lancaster in the marriage of Henry VI  and Elizabeth of York. 

South Wimbledon Station.  13th September 1926. Between Colliers Wood and Morden on the Northern Line. Built by the City and South London Railway in the standard type of the extension of the Northern Line - the first to abjure period suggestion   The character is concrete although stone faced and reminiscent of Holden's earlier office building. The corner entrances are subdivided by square piers carrying balls with the L.T. motif in the roundel.  There is a very unusual circular light fitting near the ticket office. The original name was South Wimbledon (Merton). 

120, Manor House. So called only after the c 17. Timber-framed, probably of c. 1700 with a later brick front; five bays, small central pediment with lunette.

15 Nelson Arms. Brash, jolly turn-of-the-century pub with bold lettering marks the site of the entrance to Merton Place, where Nelson lived with the Hamiltons in 1801-5.

Merton Grove built by Richard Hotham late 18th. Demolished 1913

Bus Garage 1913.

Latimer Road

St. Winefride. 1905 R.C. by F. A. Walters.

Swimming Baths, 1901 by R. J. Thomson

Merton Road

Holy Trinity. 1862 by J.Johnson, in early decorated style with a bell-turret. Interior altered 1979.  Stained Glass by Mayer of Munich, 1975.

Queensland Avenue

Home of painter, Harry Bush 1920s.

Southey Road

Wimbledon Column - main drainage ventilation pipe. Probably installed by William Santo Crimp Engineer to the Wimbledon Local 1881- 1890. The Wimbledon Sewage Farm was then in a bad state, and Crimp set out to remedy this. With ventilation pipes, carried up trees, houses or other convenient objects, or by specially constructed lamp-posts,

South Wimbledon

South Wimbledon is marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1904, but is earlier called New Wimbledon on that of 1876.


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