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Showing posts from March, 2011

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Upminster Bridge

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne continues to flow southwards towards the Thames Post to the north Upminster Post to the south Corbets Tey Branfill Road The Branfill family were local property owners from the 17th Branfill Road Meeting Room , with plaque above the door about preaching the Lord’s Word. Built pre-1950s. Bridge Avenue Hornchurch Stadium , built in 1952 with athletics facilities and it is home to AFC Hornchurch. Carlton Close Windmill. A smock mill which can be seen for miles around which was in use until 1927. The upper part is octagonal of timber and weather boarded on a brick base. It originally had three pairs of stones. The cap is dated 1799 and the timber is late 18th but the mill was actually built in 1803-4 by James Nokes. The wind shaft came from a post mill at Maldon in 1899. Additional power came from a steam engine but this and its boiler house and other building were by the County Council, who were the owners from 1940. It was opened

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Upminster

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne continues to flow south to the Thames Post to the north Emerson Park Post to the south Upminster Bridge Post to the west Emerson Park Upminster Golf Course The area of the course adjacent to the river. The club house in Upminster Hall is to the east Wych Elm Road Emerson Park School . Specialist sports college.

Thames Tributary River Ingrebourne - Upminster

Thames Tributary River Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne continues to flow south towards the Thames Post to the west Emerson Park Bird Lane Chapmans or Potkiln farmhouse 18th farm-house Pot Kilns. In 1708 Samuel Springham had a house at what is described as ‘the Brick-kilns’. Near Hall Lane there was a circular brick-kiln built in 1774 by Matthew Howland Patrick, of Upminster Hall. Here, he had just 'brought his sugar-mould-pottery to perfection'. Later it produced bricks, tiles, and pipes and in 1885 James Brown, of Braintree, Chelmsford and London, bought the lease. By then the kilns and chimneys were prominent landmarks. Brown enlarged the works, built workmen's houses and a tramway to Upminster station. The brickworks continued to operate until 1933; and it was then demolished Pit to the south of the brickworks for brick earth, At the base of it was boulder clay which, apart from a patch at Hornchurch is the most southerly evidence of the ice sheet during the whole

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Emerson Park

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne continues to flow south towards the Thames Suburban area on the edge of Upminster Post to the north Page's Wood Post to the south Upminster Post to the east Pot Kilns Hubbard’s Chase Named for Hubbard’s Farm which stood here into the 20th Elliot playground , grassy children’s play area Grasslands Hubbards Chase Piggery Hubbards Close The Old Forge , asphalt contractors. Fortune Farm , Animal by products Wingletye Lane This was once called Hay Lane after Hay Green which was near Lillyputs 272 Lillyputs Equestrian Centre. Lilliputs, is a 17th timber-framed house. The name was first noted in 1777 but the site was part of Drywoods in the Lane, dating from 1345. There is a moat here. Drywoods, stood south of Lilliputs and was demolished early 20th. Pond with embankment near the house probably an early-18th canal. Wych Elm Road Names for Wych Elm Farm, which itself was named for a particularly large tree. Sources

Thames Tributary River Ingrebourne - Page's Wood

Thames Tributary River Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne flows southwards towards the Thames Post to the south Emerson Park Post to the north Harold Wood Park Hubbard's Chase Little Chef, now defunct Site of Hornchurch Athletic CC original field in 1936 . It was then a reclaimed farmers field. Once the Second World War started they had to leave and the field returned to the farmer, with the dressing rooms converted back to a barn. Page’s Wood Largest Forestry Commission area in Thames Chase. There are bridges over the Ingrebourne and sculptures. It was formed by combining the land of Mount Pleasant and Pages Farm. Over 100,000 trees have been planted and there are swathes of woodland between grassy meadows. Prospect Road Brock & Son , firework makers, opened a factory in the area of Prospect Road. It was managed by John R. Brock closed soon after his death in 1906. Prospect Farm Ingrebourne Farm Recreation Avenue Harold Wood Primary School Southend Arterial Road

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Harold Wood

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne continues to flow southwards towards the Thames The Great Eastern Railway Line from Liverpool Street to Shenfield continues to run north eastwards from Harold Wood Station. Post to the north Harold Wood Post to the south Page's Wood Post to the west Harold Wood Harold Wood Park A large area of amenity grassland with footpaths. There is a large play and sports area, The River Ingrebourne runs through it. Harold Wood Athletic Football Club set up in 1908 is based here as is the cricket club. New Wooden Bridge across to Page’s Farm site and also decorative wooden entrance arches Miniature Golf Course Shepherd’s Hill Page’s Farm originally c13. Altered and raised by a storey in the c17, timber frame concealed by render. Three-room plan with rear gabled projection. Cross-passage brace with the date 1663 and initials of the Witham family. Has reused older timbers. Outbuildings included a late 19th timber-framed barn on a brick pl

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Harold Wood

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne flows south west and is met by Paine’s Brook flowing from the north west. The Great Eastern Railway from Liverpool Street to Shenfield runs north eastwards from Harold Wood Station Post to the west Harold Hill Post to the east Harold Park Post to the south Harold Wood Church Road Bates Industrial Estate – Bates were the developers of the brickworks site in the 1940s. The Old Brickworks Industrial Estate. Harold Wood Brickworks were established by 1878 by John Compton, later of the Grange and was sold in 1887 to Alfred Rutley. By 1894 it was run by George King from Northampton who bought the site in 1896. The brickworks had a siding at Harold Wood station. King extended the works and built four cottages but the works closed around 1900. It was used for grazing until it was reopened in 1929by Hermann Noppel. It closed again in 1933 to become waterlogged. It was redeveloped as an industrial estate In the 1940s by Thomas Bates and

Thames Tributary Paine’s Brook - Harold Hill

Thames Tributary Paine’s Brook The brook flows south towards the Ingrebourne and the Thames Post to the north Harold Hill Post to the east Harold Park Post to the south Harold Wood A12 Colchester Road Football Ground Telephone Exchange Paine’s Bridge Amersham Road Mead Primary School Goosehays Drive 44 in December 1948 the first family on the estate moved in. The father was a bus driver, with seven children. Two of his five boys were in the military and one of his two daughters was in the Women’s Land Army. Melksham Close Morris Dancer Pub. Listed 18th house. Originally New Hall Farmhouse in red and blue brick. It was originally built 1625 -1675 and the name ‘New Hall’ is medieval so it likely stands on the site of an earlier building. It is effectively two houses built together side by side since it has two separate roofs. Inside all rooms are interconnected. At one time it had a priest-hole approached from a spiral staircase and stepping through a doorway. It was a

Thames Tributary Carters Brook - Harold Hill

Thames Tributary Carters Brook The brook flows more or less south towards the Ingrebourne and changes its name to Payne’s Brook Post to the north Noak Hill Post to the south Harold Hill Post to the west Harold Hill. Straight Road Central Park Swimming Pool Health Centre Community centre Central Park Leisure Centre The David Crompton Lodge residential care home Long Wood, ancient woodland owned by the Council Dagnam Park Named from an estate called ‘‘Dagenhams ‘or ‘Dagnams’ in the middle ages having been owned in the early 14th to William de Dageham. Dagnams was a grand estate which was eventually owned by the Neave family who gradually bought the whole area up. They were followed by the London County Council. Hatters Wood . Ancient and secondary woodland, ponds. Now a nature reserve. Moat. This was the moat for Cockerel's house which in 1633 was a substantial gabled building, standing outside the moat which was used as an orchard. It had been a medieval manor owned

Thames Tributary Carters Brook - Noak Hill

Thames Tributary Carters Brook The Brook flows south towards the River Ingrebourne and the Thames Post to the west Noak Hill Post to the north Havering Plain  Post to the east Weald Side Post to the south Harold Hill Chequers Road The Forge , architectural ironwork Church Lane Hill Farm . The Long House. St.Thomas . Built as a chapel of ease in 1842 by the London architect George Smith, as a memorial to for Lady Frances Neave of Dagnams. It is a small building of red brick with a tower was restored in 1971. Inside is an 18th chamber organ from Dagnams and a collection of old glass Churchyard, monuments to the Neaves, including a Grecian pedestal to Charlotte Mary Neave, with a mourning woman. School House Community Centre . This was St. Thomas's Church of England school built in 1848 by subscription and government grant for 96 children. In 1936 it became a school for mixed juniors and infants. It has since closed and was used as a restaurant for a while. Open space w

Thames Tributary Carter’s Brook - Noak Hill

Thames Tributary Carter’s Brook The Brook rises in this area and flows south towards the River Ingrebourne Post to the east Dagnam Park Post to the north Noak Hill Church Road Spice Pit Farm Spice Pit Wood Cummings Hall Lane Lakeview Park - new housing Piggery Noak Hill The name of Noak Hill is probably derived from oak trees but it might also be to do with a family name The Neave family were the local lords of the manor from the early 19th when it was acquired by Richard Neave, a City merchant. Noak Hill Road Romford Common lay around the road south of the Bear Inn and to the north was Noak Hill Common. Noak Hill Road was laid following the enclosure of the commons in the early 19th. Roman tiles were found in this area near the Bear Inn. Bear Inn was previously The Goat House but renamed in 1715 also called the ‘Brown Bear’. Bought by Neave. In the 1960s there was a zoo there said to be the largest outside London Zoo and which has a ‘sad looking’ bear. Paternost

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Harold Park

TQ 56 92 Thames Tributary River Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne flows south west towards the Thames The Great Eastern Railway Line from Liverpool Street to Shenfield runs north eastwards from Harold Wood Station Post to the west Harold Wood Post to the north South Weald Post to the east Boyles Court Boundary London/Essex/Havering. The boundary used to follow the Weald Brook until, just past the corner of Mount Avenue it joined the Ingrebourne River. The boundary then turned sharp eastwards crossing the railway and went along the northern boundary of the sewage works, crossed Head Lane and continued eastwards. This has since been replaced by taking the boundary down the M25 Harold Park A stretch of land between the A12 and the Ingrebourne. Nags Head Lane Thames Water Treatment Station . Sewage works opened for Brentwood in 1912. South Weald and Shenfield Special Drainage District. At first R. Preston, a local solicitor offered to deal with Brentwood sewage by spreading it

Thames Tributary Stream - Dytchleys

Thames Tributary Stream A stream flows south west to join Weald Brook just south of The Chequers Rural area with big houses once in institutional use. Post to the west Weald Side Post to the north South Weald Common Post to the south St.Vincent's Hamlet Chequers Lane Weald Bridge The Chequers Tavern . Closed for a while. This was Bar Blush but closed down because of noise issues. Coxtie Green Road Dytcheleys . This is a house dating from 1727. There are some later extensions. Collinson Hall of the Shorthorn Dairy Co., lived there c. 1878–90. Used by Queen Mary College, London during the 1960/70s and was part of their sports facility. Stable and service buildings . These are 18th and 19th in red brick. There is a 3 storey clock tower Gilstead Hall . 1726 house. This is a red brick house with the date ‘1726’ and the initials ‘LW’. It was called Wealdside in the 18th, and home to the Wrights, Roman Catholic bankers. By 1863 it was a boys' boarding school and 1900-

Thames Tributary Weald Brook - Weald Side

TQ 54 96 Thames Tributary Weald Brook Thames Tributary Weald Brook. The brook continues to flow south and meets a brook coming from the west at a point where the boundary line turned. Post to the west Navestock Common Post to the north Horseman Side Post to the east Dytchleys Post to the south Havering Plain Boundary The old London/Havering/Essex boundary continued due east and then woes north east to the end of a path from Waterhale. It continued to meet a stream and then turned south east down Weald Brook. It has since been altered to go down the motorway. Horseman side Honeysuckle Cottage . Also called Houghton’s. 16th house with many alterations. Exposed timber-frame on a medieval hall house with modern herring-bone brick infilling. One medieval window remains.

Thames Tributary - Stream - Navestock Common

Thames Tributary – Tributary Stream to the Weald Brook A tributary stream to the Weald Brook flows north east Post to the west Watton's Green Post to the south Noak Hill Post to the east Weald Side Post to the north Navestock Horseman Side Watton Farm . Moated site. The Watton Farmhouse is 17th Timber-framed and weather boarded Waterhales Waterhale Farm . 16th Timber-framed and rendered house. Archaeological investigation has found brick foundations of an earlier hall house in the garden. Pond in front. Barn at Waterhales Farm. Early 17th Timber-framed, weather boarded barn. Lee Farm The Priors Golf Course Stapleford Abbots Golf Course Navestock Kennels . 17th house Timber-framed and weather boarded. New Hall Farmhouse . Early 19th yellow brick house. M25 Navestock Common Enclosed in 1770 and roads across it built then. Now it is largely golf courses.

Thames Tributary Weald Brook - Horseman Side

Thames Tributary Weald Brook The Weald Brook rises in this area and flows south to the Ingrebourne and the Thames. It is met by a tributary from the east Post to the east South Weald Common Post to the south Weald Side Post to the west Navestock Horseman Side Alma Arms Whitehouse Farmhouse . 16th Timber-framed, weatherboarded house. Barn converted to a garage. Navestock Mission Chapel converted to a house. Opened 1897 as a nonconformist chapel and then used as a local mission for the parish church. Plaque on the front. Monument beside the road Old Road Sabine’s Farm House . Early 16th Timber-framed house. Extended and altered over the centuries. Rose House Sabine’s Road Sabine’s Green Tan House Lane King William IV pub . 19th Timber-framed and plastered building. Closed but free standing sign still in place. Bower Farm . Italianate nude sculpture garden, duck pond, gypsy caravans, Chinese ducks, and black swans.

Thames Tributary Stream South Weald Common

Thames Tributary Stream This stream flows westwards towards the Weald Brook, itself a tributary to the Ingrebourne, and the Thames Post to the west Horseman Side Post to the east Bentley Post to the south Dytchleys Coxtie Green Road Oakhurst Farm Princes Road Princes Gate Farm . The farm was here by the mid 19th. Steam mill which has been converted to a house. It is a 19th Timber-framed and weather boarded building. The gables are ornamented and the main block has a projecting hoist loft. There is a wrought-iron weather vane. At the back are single storey weather boarded buildings round a yard. At one time there was also a brick chimney. Granary . This is a 17th timber-framed, weather boarded, building. There are carpenter’s marks on the frame. South Weald Common Tan House Lane Tan House . Late 18th house with a timber-frame which is pebble dash rendered. Lashe’s Farm . House of 1600. Timber-framed and rendered. Inside ceiling joists have carpenter’s marks. Thought tha

Tributary to the Thames - Stream - Bentley

Tributary to the Thames This tributary rises in this area and flows west towards the Weald Brook, itself a tributary to the Ingrebourne, and the Thames TQ 57848 96578 Pleasant country village with mill and church, and some modern warehousing industry - plus a busy main road. Post to the west South Weald Common Ashwells Road McColl Martin. Warehousing complex . They are a retailing group with over local 1,250 Convenience stores. The earliest store opened in 1901 in Glasgow and since then there have been takeovers and expansion. St Paul’s CofE Primary School . In 1864 Henry Moss set up a new church school for the poor of South Weald. In 1893 an infant room was added. Following a fire it was rebuilt in 1923. It was further enlarged in 1958 and 1974 Mores Lane This was once called Howgate Lane Bentley mill , recorded 1722, which was on the north side of the lane and was a post mill until c. 1820, when a brick tower mill replaced a wooden building. It was worked by the Moss fam

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - Brook Street

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne flows south west down the A12 The Great Eastern Railway Line from Liverpool Street to Shenfield runs north eastwards from Harold Wood Station TQ 57652 92827 Small village and subsequent developments on the main roads into and bypassing Brentwood Post to the north South Weald Post to the west Harold Park Post to the south Boyles Court Post to the east Warley Hospital A12 Brentwood Bypass Brook Street This was a hamlet and manor of 150 acres alongside the brook and the Roman Road. The estate was managed from the house. The first owner was Sir William de Bruyn succeeded by his later family members and later the Tyrrells and Harlestons and by the 15th Ropers The road is on the line of the Roman Road to Colchester 17-21 House now divided into 3 cottages. Early 16th Timber-framed, rendered and colour washed, appears to be a four-bayed house with an open hall Holiday Inn  Nags Head . 18th building which had this name in 1777 Ston

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - South Weald

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The three initial streamlets, flowing southwards, join and then turn south west along the line of the A12. Post to the north South Weald Post to the west South Weald Post to the south Brook Street Post to the east Brentwood A12 The 5-mile long Brentwood bypass dates from 1965 and in 2001, was resurfaced. The Ingrebourne runs along the line of the road Hillside Walk A Roman gold ring with the Chi Rho monogram was found here in 1948. Spital Lane Once called Spit Lane but more likely also connected to a leper hospital was founded here before 1201. This was on the corner with Brook Street and remains could still be seen in the 18th. Weald Park Way Colmar . Stable and riding school. Weald Road South Weald . Village which in 1062 was granted by Earl Harold Godwin son to Waltham Abbey. It is mentioned in Domesday when it was forest with pannage. Charles Church Homes Tower Arms , an 18th free house. Above the entrance is ‘ALAA’ and ‘1704’. T

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne - South Weald

Thames Tributary Ingrebourne The Ingrebourne rises from springs in the area of Weald Road and three small streams flow south. Post to the south South Weald Sandpit Lane South Weald Camp – this is thought to be late Iron Age and the road runs right through it. It is has a single rampart and ditch, is circular, and covers 7 acres. It is in a bad condition Langtons. Mid-16th house in red brick and in an original rectangular plan, It is named from Simon Langton, 1327 Sandpit Cottage Cricket ground Weald Park The Park is 700-years old and covers 500 acres. Landscaping was done in the early 18th for Hugh Smith, lord of the manor 1732-1745. Weald Park was taken over by the military in the Second World War for Home Guard training. The estate was sold in 1946 and purchased by Essex County Council in 1953. There is a wood with a picnic area and wide parkland leading down to a lake. The Forest Deer Park Foxdown Cottage The Cottage Weald Road Sandpits Cricket Ground Sources O

Thames Tributary Mardyke -Purfleet

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke turns south and discharges into the Thames Post to the north Purfleet Ranges Post to the south Darent Mouth Post to the east Purfleet Post to the west Crayfordness Sea Wall Flooding has always been a problem in the Thames Estuary. In the 16th tons of chalk from Purfleet was used to strengthen the sea-walls. The great flood of 1953 brought much damage to industrial Purfleet. A massive wall, which took 20 years to complete, now prevents another encroachment. Mardyke The Mardyke was once the boundary between local authorities areas – the boundary has been moved North West to the edge of what were the ranges – and is also now the London/Essex boundary. Does the fleet' in Purfleet imply a harbour and thus implies a natural channel on the Mardyke - rather than 'dyke' which is a word for an artificial ditch. In this area the Mardyke is often described as a ‘drainage ditch’ and it has been suggested that the stream is older than the

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Thurrock

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke continues to flow westwards Post to the west Purfleet Ranges Post to the north Aveley Post to the east Aveley Post to the south Purfleet A13 Thames Gateway Road Opened in 1998 Arterial Road The Southend Arterial road, opened in 1925, crossed the Mardyke ran through Watt's Woods, taking up sections of Back Lane. Faggs Farm Telephone Exchange London Road Part of the Southend Arterial road, opened in 1925 Warehouses Milehams Industrial Estate New Tank Hill Road Purfleet Road Aveley Sports and Social Club ground. Also called Fireman’s Club. Sports ground Tank Hill Road This was originally called King's Road and was a gated road, built by the government after 1760, to access the powder magazines Mardyke bridge, built in the 1760s by the Ordnance Board, was improved in the 1850s and, cast-iron bridge was built by the county in the 1880s.

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Aveley

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows westwards An area of marshland north of the river. Housing from the 1950s set in fields and marshes with no sign of any facilities or anything else. The new A13 motorway standard bypass runs between the housing and the Mardye Post to the west Aveley Post to the east Ship Lane A 13 Thames Gateway Road Hall Road Aveley Village Clinic Love Lane School. The Aveley secondary school moved here from the Back Lane site in 1964 when a school for 600 was built here. It became a comprehensive school in 1971 and moved away in 1976. The site is now housing Ship Lane Sources Victoria History of Essex

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Ship Lane

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south w est Post to the west Aveley Post to the north Ockendon Junction 30 Post to the south West Thurrock A13 Arterial road. The Thames Gateway section of the A13 dates from 1998 and comes from Wennington as a three lane dual carriageway. It intersects with the M25 at Junction 30. The A13 here dates mostly from the 1980s - including the flyover above the M25 which stood here incomplete for over 15 years. Back Lane Four deneholes recorded to the north west of the lane. M25 Thurrock Service Area Ship Lane The lane existed by the end of the 16th The Thurrock Hotel . This was a College which the South Brothers turned into a fitness centre and then a hotel. In 1939 a senior council school was opened in Back Lane for 480 children from Aveley, Purfleet, and West Thurrock. It became a county secondary school in 1945 and moved in 1964. Thurrock Football Club sports ground . The club has played at here since they were set up in 1985.

Thames Tributary Mardyke - South Ockendon

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south west Post to the east Stifford Post to the west Ockendon Junction 30 Brannett’s Wood Part Mardyke Woods. Owned by the Forestry Commission. It is said to be one of the oldest woodlands in Essex recorded in the 1339, and then called ‘Brendewod’ . It had been part of the Belhus Park Estate and managed as coppice but by 1880 this had ended. Along with the other adjacent woodlands it forms one of the largest woodland blocks in the area. There is Sycamore, Oak, Ash and Sweet Chestnut above Hawthorn, Hazel and Sycamore seedlings. Fortin Close Treetops school. Essex County Council Early Intervention Centre Millard’s Garden Forestry Ccommission. Part of Mardyke Woods and mentioned in 1397 as ‘Maynwaresgarden’. It had been part of the Belhus Park Estate and managed as coppice but by 1880 this had ended Stifford Road Industrial estate. Includes a number of brick and similar industries.

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Stifford

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows westwards Post to the west South Ockendon Post to the east North Stifford Back Lane Davy Down riverside park . Named for the local Davy family who were landowners at one time The Stifford Viaduct. Built in 1892 for the London Tilbury & Southend Railway for the line Grays and Upminster. It has 14 arches and is wide enough for a double track which has never been laid Pumping station , built in 1928, with two diesel engines. The station is still in operation, pumping water from 150 feet. The taller building is the Stifford Pumping Station and the lower one adjacent to Back Lane is the Filter House. They are owned and operated by Essex & Suffolk Water Company. Corran Way Works Cruik Avenue Mardyke County Primary School was here, which opened in 1952 but the infants building became Branwood special school. Housing now on these sites. High Road The Dog and Partridge Inn.  Noted as an alehouse in 1757. In the 17th the timb

Thames Tributary Mar Dyke - North Stifford

Thames Tributary Mar Dyke The Mar Dyke flows westwards Post to the west Stifford A13 Stifford junction High Road Once known as Stifford Street. Stifford Lodge , now the Park Inn Hotel. A house had stood on this site since the 14th and some Tudor work can still be found in the building. Until the 18th it was called Deanes or Sherwells. It was rebuilt by one of the Kingsman family in the mid 18th.) Herbert Brooks cement manufacturer and chairman of Essex county council, lived here and then Col. J. D. Sherwood, paint factory owner. In the Second World War it was used as a Canadian military hospital. Sold to Truman’s in 1968 who, despite opposition from local pubs, turned it into a hotel and it later became a Europa Hotel. Site of the ancient manor house of Stifford Hall which stood at the corner of High Road and Cuckoo Lane. It was derelict by the end of the 18th century Coppid Hall. On the front is a plaque saying ‘This house hath been antiently called Coppid Hall." It is

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Bulphan

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south, then turns south west TQ 62413 85337 Dour countryside area of scattered farms Post to the west Dunnings Lane Post to the north Bulphan Dunnings Lane Blankets Farm . Mid 18th house in red brick Fen Lane Hatch Farm Caylocks Farm Stone Hall Harrow Pub . Burnt down and derelict Drakes Farm Sources Victoria History of Essex

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Bulphan

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows west and then turns south TQ 62911 86282 Countryside area with fishing lakes and scattered farms Post to the west Dunnings Lane Post to the south Bulphan Post to the east Bulphan Clay Lane Slough House Slough House Lakes fishery Sources

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Bulphan

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows southwards and is joined from the east by two other tributaries coming from another southbound stream to the east. It then turns west. TQ 63928 86512 Bleak Essex countryside on the edge of Bulphan village Post to the north Bulphan Post to the west Bulphan Brentwood Road Bulphan Bypass Peartree Lane Sources

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Bulphan

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows southwards and is joined from the east by two other tributaries coming from another southbound stream to the east TQ 63563 87798 Grim Essex countryside with scattered farms Post to the north West Horndon Post to the south Bulphan Brentwood Road Blue House Farm Middleton Hall Creative Music Academy Bulphan By Pass Mardyke A tributary of the Mardyke forms the western boundary of a Roman field formation Tilbury Road Barnards Farm Sources Astbury. Estuary

Thames Tributary Mardyke - West Horndon

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke continues to flow southwards. Another tributary runs southwards to the east. Both are called Mardyke. Post to the north East Horndon Post to the south Bulphan Station Lane Tilbury Road Old Mill Cottages Dunton Hill Golf Course

Thames Tributary Mardyke - East Horndon

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south   East Horndon Village with church and hall isolated above the Southend Arterial Post to the west Thorndon Post to the north Brentwood Road Post to the south West Horndon East Horndon church , on a little knoll. It is squat with two storeys. The chancel and south transept are 15th on the site of a thirteenth-century church; and the south chapel, porch and tower, were added in the 16th. Inside, are monuments to the Tyrells of Heron Hall, notably one dated 1442 to Alice Tyrell in an elaborately canopied niche, flanked by her children with their names on scrolls. The Tyrell family were responsible for the 15th rebuilding of the Norman church. There is a monument by Nollekens, dated 1776. It was taken into the care of the Redundant Churches Fund in 1972. Southend Arterial Road Crossing of the A128 with the A127 collection of refreshment places Telephone Exchange now a house The Halfway House which was a large pub. This is now

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Thorndon

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows southwards Post to the east East Horndon Post to the north Thorndon Southend Arterial Road Thorndon Country Park Remains of Old Hall . Thorndon Hall replaced Old Thorndon Hall which the ruins of which are in what is now called as "ruin wood". The estate had been the manor of West Horndon and a building here was first noted in 1414 when Lewis John, a merchant, walled in a park and embattled the house. The old hall was burnt down in the early 18th and later the remains were used as farm buildings. The portico had been imported from Italy in 1742 and it was removed and remodelled for the new house. Old Hall Pond. This was a fish pond for old Thorndon Hall. In the early 18th it became part of Lord Petre’s landscape garden. He had hot houses built on the western bank for the propagation of pineapples and bananas. It is currently used for angling. Site of St.Nicholas Church Mill Wood. Thick Shaw Straight Path Shaw Pigeon Mou

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Thorndon

Thames Tributary Mardyke A tributary to the Mardyke coming from the east joins another from the north and flows southwards. Post to the south Thorndon Post to the east Brentford Road Thorndon Country Park Menagerie Plantation. Robert James, the 8th Lord Petre housed a miniature zoo here which probably included terrapins, hummingbirds and squirrels. Ancient hornbeams Obelisk Seat The Rookery Old Deer Park. Pollarded oak and ancient hornbeams

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Brentwood Road

Thames Tributary Mardyke A tributary to the Mardyke flows eastwards from the area of Laindon Hills TQ 63169 90623 Rural Essex are with farms and other buildings along the north:south running Brentwood Road Post to the west Thorndon Post to the south East Horndon Brentwood Road Cockridden Farm Estate , industrial estate South Essex Golf Centre Button Farm . Poultry centre set up in 1980 Park House Heron Court – care home Sources Victoria County History. Essex

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Little Warley Hall

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south east Post to the north Childerditch Post to the south St.Mary's Lane Old London/Essex boundary This boundary has changed and now runs down the M25. However it previously followed the Mardyke, which it continues to do. Little Warley Hall Lane Little Warley Hall . Hall and service unit of what was a larger building now a single house. It is early 16th in red brick with diaper work. Projecting garderobe tower. The house has been restored a number of times. St.Peter’s Church. 15th Ragstone church with a tower. Timber-framed and brick projecting porch. Inside are parts of medieval pews, and 17th box-pews. Monument to Sir Denner Strutt and Dorothye 1641, The Clearview. Health and Racket Club Billericay Aquatic and Reptile Centre Orchard Farm. Abattoir on site. Orchard Cottages Warley Hall Wood Southend Arterial Road Opened in 1925 by Prince Henry Sources Pevsner. Essex

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Childerditch

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south east Old London/Essex boundary This boundary has changed and now runs down the M25. However it previously followed the Mardyke and ran along the north of Warley Hall Wood. TQ 60873 89530 Countryside area with industry and a bleak landscape Post to the west Warley Street Post to the south Little Warley Hall Childerditch Hall Drive Childerditch Industrial Park . About 1937 the Essex Brick Co. opened a works here. This works were taken over c. 1946 by the Costain Concrete Co. It has since become a major industrial site with many works in place. German prisoners of war were housed on this site. Rectory Chase Stahlton Lane This was built to link the cement works at Childerditch Hall with the arterial road. The road name is that of a German concreting process developed in the 1940s and is used as a company name worldwide. Pit or earthwork Little Warley Hall Lane Virginia Nursery Sources British History on Line. Little W

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Warley Street

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south east and is joined by a tributary from ponds on the golf course to the north east Boundary London/Essex/Havering This boundary line has now been replaced by a line which goes down the M25. The old line followed a path going south east from Cricket Ground. It turned north east still on the path but left it going south east, parallel with Warley Street, before reaching a ‘works’. It crossed Codham Hall Lane and then turned north east to cross Warley Street and continued, slightly more east but still north east. To meet the Mardyke, which it then followed southwards to the northern boundary of Warley Hall Wood Post to the north Warley Gap Post to the west Parkers Shaw Post to the east Childerditch Bird Lane Great Warley Church of England Primary School , also known as the Lower Warley school. In 1843 the rector built a permanent school using a government grant, on a site given by Charles Winn, Lord Headley. The school was suppor

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Warley Gap

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south Post to the west Great Warley Post to the south Warley Street Bird Lane St Faith’s Farm . Pennorth and Stockdale Studs. Clapgate Farm. The early 18th farm house was destroyed in bombing. Magpie Lane Bluehouse Farm . 17th house Timber-framed and weather boarded, some bomb damage. Warley Park Golf Course . The course dates to 1973 Sycamore Court Care Centre. Care Centre, a purpose-built two-storey private care home run by South Cross Health Care Little Warley Lodge . A large early 19th house built for George Winn. It was bought by the South Ockendon Hospital for use as an annexe and the first patients were admitted in 1954. In 1974it was transferred to the control of the Barking and Havering District Health Authority. It closed in 1987 and was sold. It is now called Warley Hall, and is a private nursing home. Sycamore Court, occupies some of the grounds Warley Gap Part of Thames Chase Community Forest it is old narrow bel

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Great Warley

Boundary London/Essex/Havering. The boundary runs north east to the west of Hole Farm Lane and then turns sharp east to the boundary of a wood and turns south to follow the boundary. Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke flows south east Post to the west Great Warley Post to the north Warley Road Post to the south Parker's Shaw Post to the east Warley Gap Great Warley Street Village green with war memorial Chestnut Tree cottage – with pargetted tree on the wall 1 dairy and laundry 2 Two Door Cottage . 13th House - timber-framed, and colour washed, it has had additions through succeeding centuries. It has several rare medieval features and also shows the evolution of a domestic building. 3 Warley Green Cottage 16th with later additions. Timber-framed. Part of one building with 4. 4 Beam Cottage. 16th with later additions. Timber-framed. Inside timber framing made up of a hall and cross-wing. Abbey metal works . Wrought iron showrooms and includes a farrier. De

Thames Tributary Mardyke - Warley Road

Thames Tributary Mardyke The Mardyke rises in Holden’s Wood and flows south east Post to the west Boyles Court Post to the south Great Warley Post to the north Warley Hospital Dark Lane A medieval green lane between Brook Street and Great Warley Eagle Way Hartswood Spire Hospital . Private medical facility by BUPA Water Tower Great Ropers Lane Great Ropers . Late 18th House – 1772 on drainage heads. It is in yellow brick, and cast-iron balconies on the first floor. Ursuline Preparatory School . Another private ‘preparatory’ school. This one is Roman Catholic. The original school was founded in the early 1930s, and moved here in 1994 taking boys and girls aged 3-11 years. Game larder at Great Ropers Listed. This is an octagonal building from the 19th in red brick. It has windows and a doorway in alternate faces with windows having gauze infill. There is shelving inside. Bachelors Walk Great Ropers Business Centre Green Lane Is it a Roman Road coming from Horndon? M