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Showing posts from December, 2009

The London/Essex boundary - North Ockenden

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary goes directly westwards with one small kink, along the southern boundary of Top Meadow Golf Course. Post to the west North Ockendon Post to the east FenFarm

The London/Essex boundary - Fen Farm

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary goes south west down the Mardyke to meet another southbound Mardyke stream. It then turns north to follow this but leaves it before reaching Fen Lane and turns westward. It travels west ward to meet Fen Lane at Fen Farm and then follows Fen Lane until it turns northwards and the boundary continues westwards Post to the north Dunnings Lane Post to the west North Ockendon Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Fen Lane Fen Farm

The London/Essex boundary - Dunnings Lane

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary goes wiggle wiggle southwards following the Mardyke, but eventually leaves it to turn sharp eastwards then sharp south south east crossing a footpath between Dunnings Lane and Fen Lane and then crossing Fen Lane. It then turns westwards down another stream of the Mardyke. Rural area with scattered farms Post to the north Dunnings Lane Post to the east Bulphan Post to the south Fen Farm Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Fen  Lane Bullens and Herds – late 17th farm house. Timber framed Home Farm Corner Farm B & B Sources Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

The London/Essex boundary - Dunnings Lane

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary follows the Mardyke. Rural area Post to the west Bury Farm Post to the south Dunnings Lane Post to the east Bulphan   Sources

The London/Essex Boundary - Bury Farm

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary follows the Mardyke Post to the west Dunnings Lane Post to the north Warley Hall Lane Sites on the London, Havering, side of the boundary Fen Lane Bury Farm Upminster sewage works . The site is dominated by nettle willow herb and grass there are some trees. There are two ponds with vertical sides, and open ditches. The site forms a significant wetland used by birds, water vole, amphibians and invertebrates. Built in 1922 on Bury Farm lands where the site made it unnecessary to pump Mardyke Sources London County Council, Sewage Works Leaflet

The London/Essex border - Warley Street

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary follows the Mardyke. This has now been replaced. The boundary now runs east along the railway line until it reaches the Mardyke which it then follows southwards. Post to the east Cranham Post to the north Little Warley Hall Post to the south Bury Farm Sites on the London, Havering, side of the boundary St.Mary’s Lane Monks Farm Old England. Listed Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Warley Hall Lane

The London/Essex boundary - Warley Street

The London, Havering/Essex, Brentwood border goes east along the railway line. Post to the west Cranham Post to the east Little Warley Street Sites on the London, Havering, side of the border St. Mary’s Lane Puddle Dock. Site of sewage works. Fishery and farm Nursery Warley Street Upminster Trading Park . This was the site of Alma Ammunition factory in the 1930's then owned by Plessey Electronics

The London/Essex border - Cranham

The London, Havering/Essex, Brentwood boundary goes southwards down the M25 motorway as far as the railway where it turns east and continues along the line. Suburban area to the north of Upminster Post to the north Cranham Post to the east Warley Street Post to the south Thames Chase Forest Centre Sites on the London, Havering, side of the border Cranham. Cranham Playing Fields on the site of brickworks. Two formerly agricultural fields were added in 1949. Cranham Brick and Tile Company works . They established clay digging and brick kilns in 1900, west of Frank's wood and north of the railway. In 1908, it became the Shenfield and Cranham Brick and Tile Co., Ltd and, seventy men were employed. The brick-earth began to run out in 1915, and the site was closed in 1920 but the buildings were not demolished until 1929. A park was proposed in 1934, and it was bull-dozed in 1946. Some bricks can still be found local gardens. Some of the area is grassland, with small scrubby

The London/Essex Boundary - Cranham

The London, Havering/ Essex, Brentwood border goes down the M25 TQ 5877088914 Rural area merging into suburbs along the M25 Post to the north Parker's Shaw Post to the south Cranham Sites on the London, Havering, side of the border Bird Lane Runs east west from Great Warley Street to Codham Hall. Sites on the Essex side of the border Codham Hall Lane In the Middle Ages a north south road, called the Pilgrims Way passed by here. Codham Hall Cottages Codham Hall . First mentioned in 1276 belonged to the Warley Franks estate and was rebuilt in the 19th by Richard Benyon. It is a large building of yellow brick, typical of his work and it would have had a uniform trim of dark red paint. Belongs to the County Council and let into units. In the 1950s hop growing was introduced here, the only Essex site for this. Hazle Ceramics Workshop Latchet’s Shaw Codham Hall Wood The wood has a snaking boundary bank and a medieval ditch. There are five boundary pollarded trees, a

The London/Essex Border - Parker's Shaw

Boundary London/Essex/Havering. The boundary follows the boundary of Well Wood (Coombe Wood on the other map) to Hole Farm Lane. The boundary goes south east along the boundary of a wood, crossing a path between Farm Lane and Warley Street and then intercepting and following another path along the edge of the wood and turning at Pavilion north east to Cricket Ground. The boundary has been adjusted to run down the M25. Post to the north Great Warley Post to the east Warley Street Post to the south Cranham Post to the west Cranham Folkes Lane Sites on the London, Havering side of the boundary Hole Farm Lane In the middle ages a north south road, called the Pilgrims Way passed by here. Parkers Shaw Cricket Ground Hole Farm . Farmhouse. Originally a hall house. It is a small and timber-framed house of late medieval type. In the 17th a chimney and ceiling were inserted in the central room and in the 18th the house was divided into cottages. It has been modernised in the 20th.

The London/Essexborder - Great Warley

Boundary London/Essex/Havering. The boundary follows a path going southwards to Stoneyhylls Farm. It then curves south west crossing a path and the M25 and then turns sharp south west crossing Warley Road. It follows the edge of Foxburrow Wood and then turns sharp eastwards along a path. Crosses the M25 and continues to cross Berends Lane and then continues east along the edge of Well Wood (called Coombe Wood on the other map). The boundary has been adjusted to just run down the M25 Post to the north Boyles Court Post to the east Grear Warley Post to the south Cranham Folkes Lane Sites on the Essex side of the border Warley Road Worm Walk Shaw . Part of Jermain’s Wood with oak and hazel and a layer of bracken and bluebell. Jermains Wood . Ancient woodland with good flora. Ash is dominant but suffering from die-back. There is mature hornbeam coppice in the north. The ground cover includes bluebell with dog's mercury ground ivy and moschatel. There are glades in the wood

The London/Essex border - Great Warley

Boundary London/Essex/Havering The boundary goes eastwards across the top of Gibblins Shaw, crosses the M25, continues along the southern boundary of a wood, Top Plantation, crosses a belt of woodland, the northern section of Jackson’s Wood, and continues on the other side of it along the southern boundary of wood. It intercepts a south bound path at the edge of the wood, which is coming from Boyle’s Court Farm, and turns south to follow the path. Recent changes mean that the boundary having crossed the M25 north of Gibblings Shaw, turns south and continues down the Motorway. Post to the west Harold Park Post to the north Brook Street Post to the east Warley Road Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Dark Lane Once a green lane between Brook Street and Warley Boyles Court . 1776, red brick. Rebuilt with wrong design in the18th. Now a remand home and assessment centre. Medieval manor house,. Rebuilt and became the home of the RC Lescher family. Top Plantation Tylers Shaw

The London/Essex border - Harold Park

TQ 56 93 Boundary London/Essex/Havering .The boundary goes down the Weald Brook. This has since changed to go down the M25 to junction 11 and then turn west along the A12 to Putwell Bridge where it joins the Ingrebourne. The River Ingrebourne and the Weald Brook meet in the area of Putwell Bridge. The Ingrebourne then flows south west Post to the north South Weald Post to the east Brook Street Post to the south Harold Park Sites on the Essex side of the border Alder Wood Colchester Road Roman road from London to Colchester, turnpiked in 1726 for the Middlesex and Essex Trust. Tollhouse for the turnpike stood near the western end of the modern Brentwood bypass. Putwell Bridge. Built c. 1582. In the 18th century it was taken over by the Middlesex and Essex turnpike trust and was listed in 1857 as a county bridge, substantially built of brick on one segmental arch. A number of streams converge here on the Weald Brook as the main road crosses it. Brook Street Interchange.

The London/Essex border - South Weald

TQ 56 93 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continued down the Weald Brook The Weald Brook flows south east towards the River Ingrebourne and the Thames. It is joined by a stream from the north east rising in the area of the chalybeate spring. Post to the west Weald Side Post to the south Harold Park Post to the east South Weald Sites on the Essex side of the border Bennetts Farm Front Park Chalybeate Spring . The water was said to be chiefly “splenetic with a small impregnation of sulphur," and to have “drying and astringent quality.” It was recommended for haemorrhages. The Oaks

The London/Essex border - Weald Side

TQ 55 94. The London/Havering/Essex boundary goes down the Weald Brook. On later maps this has changed to going down the M25. The Weald Brook flows south and east towards the River Ingrebourne and the Thames Post to the west Noak Hill Post to the east South Weald Sites on the London,Havering, side of the border Dagnam Park The Osiers . Ancient woodland in private ownership Burnt Wood . Ancient woodland in private ownership Fir Wood Weald Brook This crosses under the motorway four times and is the main source branch of the River Ingrebourne. The high, steep banks are dominated by shrubs and trees with bramble, hawthorn, young sycamore and alder and there is little channel vegetation. Deer use it and there are water voles.

The London/Essex border - St.Vincent's Hamlet

TQ 55 95 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continued due east goes down the Weald Brook. More recently it just goes down the M25 motorway. The Weald Brook flows south towards the River Ingrebourne and the Thames Post to the north South Weald Post to the west Havering Plain Post to the south Weald Side Sites on the Essex side of the border Coxtie Green Road Frieze Hill St.Vincent’s Hamlet A group of cottages for the Rochettes estate. In the 1820s the estate was the home of, and was improved by, Admiral Jervis, Earl of St.Vincent. Weald Road Hou Hatch . Built in the later 18th and extended in red brick in the 19th Home of Captain Smith in 1777, when it already had a park. Further landscaping carried out c. 1824 for the Willan family. Osgood Hanbury lived there c. 1863–82, of the brewing and banking family, Wealdside. In 1788 this was a copyhold called Hoses but a central brick block was built in the later 18th. The house was bought in 1850 by the Towers and it was l

The London/Essex border - Havering Plain

TQ 54 95 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continues due east Goes across the M25 north east. It then continues down the motorway. On older maps it continues north east. Post to the north Weald Side Post to the west Noak Hill Post to the east St.Vincent's Hamlet Post to the south Noak Hill Sites on the London, Havering,side of the border Chequers Road Pentowen Farm Havering Plain In the middle ages this was Crocleph and later Havering wood. It was a 255 acre common. Wabbings Plantation Sevenacre Plantation Curtis Plantation – private secondary woodland

The London Essex border - Noak Hill

TQ 53 95 The London/Havering/Essex boundary Goes north east with a blip to cross Church Road and then go along the north wall of Old Crown, it cross the path at the back and goes north alongside the north western boundary of a wood to the M25 Thames Tributary – tributary stream to the Weald Brook. The Stream flows north east towards the Weald Brook, itself a tributary to the Ingrebourne, a tributary to the Thames Post to the West Pyrgo Wood Post to the north Navestock Common Post to the eAst Havering Plain Post to the south Noak Hill Sites on the London, Havering side of the border Benskins Lane Kennels, contractors, breaches of planning control and contract killings. Goatswood Lane Old Crown Farm - vet 171 Greyhound Training Track. Professional Rottweiler training establishments Paternoster Row Kiln at medieval pottery site Priors Golf Course Spice Pit Wood

The London/Essex boundary - Pyrgo Wood

TQ 51 95 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continues due east along the north of Sandpits Plantation where it meets another boundary from the north. It then turns north east Post to the west Tysea Hill Post to the north Watton's Green Post to the east Noak Hill Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Goatswood Lane Hope Farm, Travellers site, Pyrgo Wood Tysea Hill Asheton Farm. Bought by the County Council in 1939 to save it for the green belt. Various traders there. Skips Corner Farm

The London/Essex boundary -Tysea Hill

TQ 51 95 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continues north east crossing a path at the end of Straights Plantation. It continues east and crosses North Road. It continues through the centre of Palace Plantation. Post to the north Tysea Hill Post to the west Bournebrook Bridge Post to the east Pyrgo Wood Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Nupers Hatch Nupers Farm . Fish farm Oak Hill Road Lodge Palace Plantation Boylands Oak Farm Spencers Farm Tysea Hill Townley Cottages Lyngs Farm Stapleford Common Chapel. built for the owners of Pyrgo Park as a private chapel to the estate and in particular the Gibb family 1830. Now housing. Originally St Edwards. Built of brick with a bell cote, gothic windows

The London/Essex boundary - Havering Park

TQ 50 94 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continues due east and dips slightly southwards, to return north eastwards crossing a path, Witch Hill Plantation, and another patch of trees. Post to the north Bournebrook Bridge Post to the west Havering Park Sites on the London, Havering, side of the boundary Avenue Wood Bower Farm Road Bower Farm. Part of Havering Park. The original 18th Bower Farm was built on the site of the royal house But David McIntosh demolished it and built Havering Park. The name Bower Farm was transferred to a new house, built about the same time. Bailiff’s house , Cottage, cattle sheds now converted to stables. Coloured brick trim to the windows. Gas house with chimney. Havering Park Havering Park. The dock contractor Hugh McIntosh acquired the estate in 1828. His son David McIntosh, built a substantial house c. 1850-70, Italianate which was demolished in 1925. Havering Country Park. The extensive grounds, heavily planted by the Macintoshes,

The London/Essex boundary - Havering Park

TQ 49 94 The London/Havering/Essex boundary continues due east Post to the west Hainault Road Post to the north Bournebridge Lane Post to the east Havering Park Post to the south Havering Park Thames Tributary River Rom The Rom continues to flow south west Sites on the London, Havering, side of the border Foreberry Wood North (or Foxberry) Probably ancient Woodland. Dominated by oak with hornbeam coppice and ash. There is elm, hawthorn and hazel as well as blackthorn and holly. On the ground are bramble and ivy with bluebells. The large amount of dead wood mean the wood is full of birds and invertebrates. Havering Park Historic name for the area and then the name for a development area. Lodge Lane Park Farm . Built In 1869 by David McIntosh and it is a striking example of a model farm from the heyday of 19th farming. The buildings are grouped round a courtyard, included several large brick barns, workers' cottages, and an original engine house. buildings on the

The London/Essex border - Hainault Forest

TQ 48 94 The London/Redbridge/Essex boundary goes From Cabin Hill and follows the belt of woodland where it meets the Havering Boundary The London/Havering/Essex Boundary goes from the woodland goes due east cutting across the top of Sandhill Post to the west Hainault Forest Post to the north Lambourne Post to the east Havering Park Sites on the London side of the border Hainault Country Park Sandhills Lower Sandhills. Large blocks of woodland with ash, hornbeam, oak, hazel, holly and honeysuckle. There are also planted trees such as Scots pine and common lime. The oaks have rot with nest holes, and terrestrial fungi. Birds include hobby, goldcrest, nuthatch and three woodpeckers. Large flocks of finches in winter include lesser redpoll and siskin, and crossbills. Mile Plantation. larger block of woodland with ash, hornbeam and oak.

London/Essex boundary - Hainault Forest Cabin Hill

TQ 47 94 The London/Redbridge/Essex boundary goes north east across Hainault Forest to Cabin Hill Post to the north Lambourne End Post to the east Hainault Forest Post to the south Hainault Forest Post to the west Chigwell Row Maypole Sites on the London,Redbridge side of the boundary Crabtree woods Hainault Country Park, That part of the Forest of Essex, east of the Roding, was owned by Barking Abbey until the Dissolution, after which the Crown took it over. This Part of the hunting forest was enclosed in 1851 and then cleared for farming. The London County Council bought Lambourne Common in 1903 and an extension to it in 1934. It has some agricultural use and there is a golf course. The 800 acres of Fox Burrows Farm and surviving woodland was preserved in 1902-5 through the efforts of Edward North Buxton, Verderer of Epping Forest. He encouraged the LCC to purchase the land, oversee its reafforestation and replanting for grass and heathland, and to open it to the public.

London/Essex boundary - Hainault Central

TQ 43 96 The London/ Redbridge /Essex boundary goes east parallel with Hainault Way and Brocket Way but turns south east at Romford Road and follows the road to a site and turns north east at that point Thames Tributary Seven Kings Water flows south west on the line of Peregrine Road Post to the west Grange Hill  & Hainault Post to the east Hainault Post to the south Hainault   Post to the north Chigwell Row Maypole Sites on the London, Redbridge side of the boundary Agister Road Maintains the general spirit of forestry terms. An agister was appointed by the king to settle claims regarding cattle pasture and pigs searching for acorns. Brocket Way Houses of the sort most common on the Hainault Estate. Steel-frames with pressed-steel-sheet cladding on the upper floors. Many are largely intact, and retain much of the original colouring introduced to avoid monotony. But some are reclad in brick. Falconer Road Fowler Road Hainault Estate Built by the London County C

London/Essex boundary - Grange Hill & Hailault

TQ 93 46 The London/ Redbridge /Essex boundary follows the railway line north and then turns north east up Lambourne Road. At a school boundary it turns south, then east on the school boundary, skirts the northern end of Brock Close and continues north of Hainault Way. Post to the west Grange Hill  Station Post to the north Chigwell Row Post to the east Hainault Post to the south Hainault  Station Sites on the Essex side of the border Arrowsmith Road Boar Close Crossbow Road Fallow Close Fletcher Road Harbourer Close Harbourer Road Hart Crescent Hind Close Lambourne Road Manford Way Manford Way Primary School , a design of 1948 by Harold Conoly the Essex County Architect, set back behind a lawn. It has a tower at the junction of the single-storey classroom block, open to the playground on the side, offices and the separate nursery with its own garden at the end Grange Secondary School The Assumption, R.C., is of 1952-3 by D. J. Buries, red brick, redon

London/Essex boundary - Hainault Station

TQ 45 92 The London/ Redbridge /Essex boundary goes east until it gets to the Central Line, and then turns north up the line. Post to the west Hainault Post to the north Grange Hill Post to the east Hainault Post to the south Fairlop Plain Sites on the London,Redbridge, side of the boundary Beech Grove Street name maintains the general spirit of forestry Site of a Second World War Italian Prisoner of War camp Bramson Close Chestnut Grove Street name maintains the general spirit of forestry Covert Road Street name maintains the general spirit of forestry Cypress Grove Street name maintains the general spirit of forestry Dryden Close, Houses here were bought by Hughes Co. Scientific Instrument firm for their workers Infants school 1952-3. Inglewood Street name maintains the general spirit of forestry Lime Grove Street name maintains the general spirit of forestry Forest Road London Playing Fields Forest Road Playing Field/ Hainault Recreation Ground. In

London/Essex boundary - Hainault Fencepiece

TQ 44 92 The London/ Redbridge /Essex boundary goes east south of Bracken Drive and Murtwell Drive. It crosses Fencepiece Road and turns south east along the northern end of Brookside. It then follows to the rear the V shape of Limes Avenue and Copper Avenue Post to the west Claybury Post to the north Grange Hill Post to the east Hainault Post to the south Fulwell Cross Sites on the London, Redbridge side of the boundary Anne Way One of a large group of Tudor road names here Aragon Drive One of a large group of Tudor road names here Boleyn Way One of a large group of Tudor road names here Brunswick Gardens, Appears to be an intruder among a large group of Tudor road names here Cardinal Drive One of a large group of Tudor road names here Cleeves Walk. One of a large group of Tudor road names here Franklyn Gardens Baptist Church . Hainault Baptist church started in 1938. During the war meetings were held in the pavilion of a playing field and then in the home

London/Essex border - Claybury Hospital site

The London/ Redbridge /Essex boundary goes east across the drive to the hospital from Manor Road. And goes south east along the northern boundary of the site and then crosses Tomswood Road. It then turns north east to run south of Bracken Drive. TQ 42922 91332 New housing on the site of a vast old mental hospital dramatically sited among hill top woodland Post to the west Woodford Bridge Post to the north Chigwell Post to the east Hainault Site to the south Claybury Sites on the London, Redbridge, side of the boundary Claybury The land rises from the Thames to a height of about 230 ft. near Claybury Marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1883, earlier ‘Le Clayberye’ 1270, ‘Cleyberye’ 1566, from Old English. The area is now usually known as ‘Clay Hall’. Both names come from the de la Clay family. The original estate of Claybury was near Woodford Bridge and was owned by Barking Abbey. In 1401 the tenant was John Malmaynes and in 1652-it was held by Alderman John Fowke, L

The London/Essex border - Woodford Bridge

TQ 42 92 The London/ Redbridge /Essex boundary has crossed Chigwell Road going south east and then crosses Manor Road and then turns east. Thames Tributary River Roding The Roding flows southwards Post to the west Woodford Bridge Post to the north Woodford Bridge Post to the east Claybury Sites on the London, Redbridge, side of the boundary Ashton Playing Fields Ashton Park . Playing fields of 50 acres administered by a trust. It is close to the river and made after draining the water meadows, It has a with pavilion and community centre built in 1937 with a modern design by Herbert Welch of simple rendered walls, and low wings. It was given by H.S. Ashton of Ingatestone 'to encourage the right use of leisure'- as is noted on a lettered tablet. A matching tablet records his death in 1943 and that of his son in 1942. The track was built in 1973 and was the first synthetic one in Essex. It originally had a Rubkor surface which replaced a cinder track which was to the

The London/Essex border - Woodford Bridge

TQ 93 42 The London/Waltham Forest/Essex boundary crosses the Roding and the M11 going south east. It then follows a water channel at the backs of houses and crosses Chigwell Road Thames Tributary River Roding - the Roding flows south and west Post to the west Roding Valley Post to the north Chigwell Post to the east Chigwell Post to the south Woodford Bridge Sites on the London, Redbridge, side of the border Ashton Playing Fields The grounds were named after Mr. H.S. Ashton of Ingatestone who put up most of the money. Sites on the Essex side of the border Chigwell Road 735 Three Jolly Wheelers . Late 19th inn at the borough boundary. It is red brick with a rendered ground floor and Norman Shaw-like end. , It originally relied heavily on the tourist trade and used to hire out horses and traps to day-trippers going to Epping Forest. Hill House High Road West Hatch High School . The school has 1,300 students from the local area and 200 sixth form pupils from a wide

The London/Essex border - Roding Valley

TQ 41 93 The London/Waltham Forest/Essex boundary comes south east and crosses Farm Way, going between Farm Way and Beresford Drive. It crosses Kings Avenue, and the Railway where it turns north and follows the railway northwards The London/Waltham Forest/Essex boundary comes south down the Roding and then, south of the sewage works, turns east These boundaries have been subject to change The river Roding continues to flow south Post to the north Buckhurst Hill Post to the east Woodford Bridge Post to the south Woodford Bridge Post to the west Woodford Wells Sites on the Essex side of the border Farm Way 159 Little Monkhams . Burnt down the day before it went to Planning Committee Railway Loughton Junction . Line built to Loughton in 1856. Fairlop Loop joined to it in 1903 from Ilford. From here on the line to Chigwell a double track curves east on a high embankment across the Roding Valley, Station Way Roding Valley Station . 3rd February 1936. Between Chigwell

The London/Essex border - Buckhurst Hill

The London/ Waltham Forest/Essex boundary comes south east down Monkhams Lane to Farm Way. TQ 41761 94283 Post to the west Buckhurst Hill Post to the east Chigwell Post to the south Roding Valley Residential area to the south of Loughton. Sites on the Essex side of the border Albert Road Prince of Wales St.Stephen’s Church . Mission church built as a chapel of ease to St. John's in 1876 Alfred Road Mission. Built as a Baptist Mission in 1863. Stock brick building used by the Salvation Army Buckhurst Hill Bocherst 1135 means 'wooded hill growing with beeches', from Old English and it lies in Essex just to the north of Woodford . Farm Close Monkhams Farm in 1839 included 178 acres and was let by James Mills to William Death. It farm survived until 1936, when it was broken up for building. The house was demolished but it stood at the south-west corner of Lords Bushes. Lords Bushes Isolated part of Epping Forest secured for the public in 1878. 9

The London/Essex border - Buckhurst Hill

The London/Waltham Forest/Essex boundary comes south east from Brook Road and goes down Tuttlebee Lane to cross Epping New Road. It continues down Beech Lane, crosses Woodford High Road and continues on the same trajectory across Knighton’s Green and Knighton’s lane, down Monkham’s Lane. TQ 40540 93824 A series of greens and pubs on the old A11 road out of London into Essex Post to the north Buckhurst Hill Post to the east Buckhurst Hill Post to the west Friday Hill Post to the south Woodford Wells Sites on the London, Redbridge side of the border Brook Road Rigg’s Retreat. Tea house and other refreshments. Owned by a Mr. Riggs – but there seem to be other sites with the same name, The Birkbeck . Grassland meadow area cut for hay. Epping New Road Road built by MacAdam in 1834 across Fairmead Bottom Lodge House. This was the lodge to Knighton House, home of Edward North Buxton, a leading campaigner for Epping Forest and it is consciously picturesque who in 1866 had the

The London/Essex border -Buckhurst Hill

The London/Waltham Forest/Essex boundary goes south to cross Rangers Road from Epping Forest. It follows the stream from Connaught Water to meet the Redbridge boundary at Whitehall Plain. The London/Redbridge.Essex boundary goes south west down Whitehall Plain to cross Brook Road The River Ching flows south and west TQ 40611 94127 As the old A11 climbs out of London into Essex, it widens and there is more green space Post to the north Epping Forest Post to the south Buckhurst Hill Post to the west Chingford Sites on the Essex side of the boundary Church Road St John the Baptist . The parish church built in 1837 as a chapel of ease. In the following year it became a separate ecclesiastical district. It has a nave, chancel, aisles, north porch, and tower with pinnacles and spire and has been enlarged. It is a stone building in the Early English style. St.John’s Church of England School Rectory – demolished and replaced by Glebe House in the church grounds. Epping New