Plumstead Common

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Admaston Road

Churbim and Seraphim St. Michael's Church

Blendon Terrace

Wooded ravine which was part of the grounds of Brambleberry House. Now a designated Site of Local Importance and is managed as a nature reserve by Plumstead Common Environment Group. The name is most appropriate, since the site remains an important breeding ground and home to many species of birds. Also known as Bird's Nest Hollow, also known as The Dip.  Approximately 1.25 hectares in area. After the demolition of St Margaret's Church in 1970 it gradually became an unofficial dumping ground. Designated a nature conservation area in 1992, and in 2004 it was granted official status as a Site of Local Importance. It is aptly named, in view of the huge crop of blackberries the nature reserve hedgerow produces each year.  Secondary woodland covers the majority of the site: sycamore which is being gradually thinned and coppiced, and ash, with a number of trees, occasional planes, sessile and English oak, horse chestnut and silver birch. The shrub layer is dense in places, with frequent holly, hawthorn, hazel, elder, English elm and, at the northern end, yew. A legacy of a least part of the site's history as a garden is the single mulberry tree which remains near the northern perimeter. Clumps of snowdrops can be seen at the southern end in early spring and bluebells once more cover the eastern slopes in April-May. The reserve is a haven for bird life and in the open grassland areas different species of butterfly can be seen.

Puddingstone boulders. A rock studded pit. At the heart of the dip are the puddingstone boulders which were deposited during the Ice Age and look like Christmas puddings.

Bramblebury Road


Burwash Road

Chestnut Rise

18-22

Dothill Allotments,

allotments with flowers, scrub, birds and a nature reserve. Entry is through large wooden gates. This is a wooded embankment on the slopes of Shooters Hill, bordered by a housing estate with views across the Thames. in 1987 it was licensed to the London Wildlife Trust as a nature reserve.  The grassy upper part of the slope has brambles spilling  down towards the damper, area with dense cver.  A natural spring feeds a stream, itself feeding a pond surrounded by soft rush, hairy willow herb, sweet grass and common reed.  There are remains of ancient woodland in oak, ash, birch and wild service trees.  A hawthorn hedge has been planted along the western edge.  There is a population of frogs and birds - blackcaps, willow warblers and tits.

Ennis Road.

New houses on west side, gardens to large house on east. 

Garland Road/Dothill Road

Access road to abattoir

Hargor Road. (Not on AZ)

Hinstock Road.

Islam Road

Kirk Lane 

Macoma Road.

North of Shooters Hill

Complex geology. Plateau of Blackheath and Woolwich Beds

Old Mill Cottages (not on az)

Old Mill Road

1 The Old Mill pub.  Mill of 1636 was blown down in 1763. The present one 1764 by James Groom who also got a licence, closed 1847 and the sails removed. It has been used by the pub ever since. Grade II listed.  Pub is Victorian. Lemon coloured has been a public house since the time of Charles II. It is part of the 18th century Old Windmill, a smoke mill used until the 1850s.  In 1848 the mill ceased to grind wheat and turned to selling alcohol.

St.Mark with St. Margaret.  St Margarets was a Victorian church, built in 1858, dominated the area with its substantial tower. By 1965 it was felt in the diocese that there were too many churches locally and that they were too costly to maintain.   St Margaret's had structural problems and in spite of its local popularity, with its 'village green' setting, the decision was taken to close in 1966 and combine with St Mark's in Old Mill Road. The vicarage in Vicarage Park became once again a private house. The church and neighbouring Victorian mansion, Powis Lodge, were demolished in 1970. St Mark's too was demolished and a new purpose built church, St Mark with St Margaret, was built on the Old Mill Road site.  All that remains of the church is the altar, the tubular bells and stained glass high up on the left in the entrance lobby of St Mark with St Margaret

Plumstead Manor School.. Built on a site formerly occupied by cottages, this is an impressive building from 1914—a tall 21/a-storey red brick building in the classical manner with a brick front facing Plumstead Common.  it sustained bomb damage during the 2nd World War but was restored . A comprehensive for 1,400 girls. It was originally built as Plumstead County Secondary.  Behind is a sports hall, plus a sequence of additions by Powell & Moya, 1970-3. These buildings, are compact yet not cramped, grouped round a variety of courtyards, and linked by a spine corridor.. The school has the Old Mill s its logo. It was opened as an eight form comprehensive school in 1967, amalgamating three school -  King's Warren grammar school on Old Mill Road, Waverley School on Ancona Road and Church Manorway in Plumstead. Ancona Road School, as Waverley School had been originally known, was was an elementary school, as also was Church Manorway.  Plumstead County School for Girls, had became known as King's Warren, and had been opened following the 1902 Education Act.  The building of 1913, had contained every facility for a 'liberal education' for girls and forms the front part of the Plumstead Manor School.

 9 Prince Albert A well patronised pub

15 cellars of the old mill, used for grain storage, are under the house.


Palmerston Road

Parkdale Road

Pendrell Street.


Plum Lane

Plumcroft School

10-20 Shrewsbury Villas

22-32

Two covered reservoirs of Kent Water Co., 1890s, 850,000 gall at above OD, Plumstead pumping station, 1890 one well and one engine, 63 hp, cottage for the man in charge, 3 reservoirs of each 2m gall, originally reservoirs for Dr.Clarke's process for softening chalk water in 1858, apparatus softened water with cream of lime, but chalk precipitate choked it, 1861 Plumstead Woolwich and Charlton Pure Water Co. auctioned in 1861

10-32

Madeira Villas. Mid 19th

Clay Farm House. 

Plumstead Common Road

1-4 Heath Villas

44 Lord Bloomfield

101 with sides glazed. 2-storey, one window right extension.

57 Fox and Hounds

71-81

83-89

102 Unity Cottages 1848

86-100

84

106-108.Two detached 2-storey houses with slate roofs.

106 yellow stock brick with a parapet roof and overhanging eaves and a painted front to the road

108 19th house

110 arly 19th villa with alterations. 2-storeys and basement. Low pitched roof with eaves soffit. Multicoloured stock brick

110b

111 Prince of Wales The Arsenal Football Club, as it is known today, was originally formed as Dial Square Football Club, after Dial Square in the Royal Arsenal, at a meeting held in October 1886 at the Prince of Wales Public House on Plumstead Common.

196-212 'The Links' Clock Tower Built in 1904/5. A prominent local land mark. rising from and forming part of the doors of the RACS supermarket. First floor central section in red brick; side with  pebbledash render. Second floors have mock Tudor half-timber with rendered panels. Oriel window to first and second floor of central section Most of right hand at first floor level is missing. Steeply sloping tiled roof to ornate clock tower with pyramidal roof topped by weather vane. Co-op terrace  Mock Tudor style with ornate clock tower and weather vane.  Rhine castle style. The Links refers to uneven ground leading up to Shrewsbury Park.  Name of a large house once on the site.

Belle Vue Cottage – fine portico early 19th

Ebeneezer Terrace 1848

Globe Court is on the site of the Globe Cinema locally called The Picture Palace and demolished 1955.

'Prince of Wales' P.H. Late 19th Century building in Dutch style, 2-storeys and attic. Red brick with .white stone dressings. On both fronts the curved gable at right has a round window with four keystones. High pitched, slated roof.

Star. Collection of old photographs of the area.

The Dip – the area approaching Blendon Terrace.  Also called The Hollow

Trinity Methodist Church Polygonal church with prominent corona

Modern almshouses at south east corner of Heavitree Road and Park Road.

Plumstead Common

The name comes from fruit trees which were grown locally. Inned by monks from Lesnes, who owned the area, and before that the high ground was where the church was on a headland. Chalk workings and abandoned gravel diggings. The ownership later passed to Queens College, Oxford. It was used by the War Office who said they had a right to exercise troops on it  - Landmann walking there in the late 18th went to the battery, which was there.  There were later riots and protests by the Metropolitan Board of Works, led by John de Morgan. This led to the Metropolitan Board of Works Plumstead Common Act of 1878. The War Office were allowed to use 72 acres. The Metropolitan Board of Works gave some land to the LSB and a school was built. Later the London County Council bought the rights from Queen's College, for £9,000 and then in 1884 bought Sots Hole with a dust shoot and two cottages on it – a horse and cart fell into them in 1858. The Rights of the Woolwich Board of Health were extinguished by £500. Queen's College developed site next to Old Mill Road and bought the Parratt from British Land Co, 1887. A Roman coffin and skeleton found was sent to Maidstone Museum in 1890. The Arsenal Football Club’s first match under the name Royal Arsenal Football Club took place here against Erith on the 8th January 1887.

It is sand and shingle on the Blackheath beds. The common is made up of acid grassland on the sandy upland with gorse and broom.  There is oak and birch and bluebells.

Reservoir

First World War Memorial -  'To the Glorious Memory of our fallen comrades of the 8th London Howitzer Brigade RFA TF who gave their lives in the Great War of 1914 to 1918'.   Sited near where the bandstand once was.

Memorial to George Webb

Bowling Green with its Pavilion within a civic area with rose beds, spring bulbs and shrubs and hedges.  There also used once to be a putting green.

Tennis Courts adjacent to the bowling green.

Boulders near the entrance to the Adventure Playground.  In 1883 noted and it was guessed they were part of a ‘bluff headland’.

Adventure Playground – on the site of an Edwardian bandstand where the RA band played in summer. In 1970s replaced by the playground. Terraced seating or you could sit on the pudding stones.

Bandstand – was the old one from Southwark Park put there in the 1880s.

Laid out in inferior lawn tennis courts. Belongs to LCC. The ground rises rapidly to Plumstead Common with sudden dips east and west. Soil gravel and chalk with bits of clay on the high ground. 

Shrewsbury Park

Estate of Shrewsbury Housewith old woodland. At the golf course boundary are London County Council boundary markers.

The Oaks. Grassy gully with flat bottom and steep sides, trees, lots of children swing down the slope.

High Grove.  A small area of ancient woodland with oak, birch, ash and sycamore.  There is also wild service and maple.

Boundary marker "stones" may be seen elsewhere in the area, notably along the fence which separates Shrewsbury Park from Shooters Hill golf course and at the end of Winn's Common.  

Shrewsbury House. Now a community centre.

St John's Road,

Ending abruptly in a miniature precipe at the west end, 

St Margaret's Grove

St.Margaret's School – Victorian School and now a C. of E. Primary School.   A plaque says: ‘Plumstead Central Schools erected by Grant of £1000 from the War Department. The voluntary contributions of 3807 parishioners and a further grant from the Committee of Council on Education Rev. W.Acworth Vicar. John Cooke, William May Churchwardens”.  This is a modest village school of 1856, with a steep roof and a tower with small metal steeple. Inside there is a memorial of St.Margaret's church in a stained glass window set in a box. It shows St Margaret praying, with the words "Lord lettest now thy servant depart in peace'' underneath it.

Azile Everitt House site of St Margaret's Church, became parish church in 1864. St Margarets, was a Victorian church, built in 1858, dominated the area with its substantial tower. By 1965 it was felt in the diocese that there were too many churches locally and that they were too costly to maintain.   St Margaret's had structural problems and in spite of its local popularity, with its 'village green' setting, the decision was taken to close in 1966 and combine with St Mark's in Old Mill Road.  The church and neighbouring Victorian mansion, Powis Lodge, were demolished in 1970. St Mark's too was demolished and a new purpose built church, St Mark with St Margaret, was built on the Old Mill Road site.  For reasons, which seem hard to justify now, and in spite of vigorous opposition from residents and members of the Plumstead Society, predecessors of Plumstead Common Environment Group, Greenwich Council erected a huge twelve storey block of flats, Azile Everitt House, on the site of St Margaret's in 1976/7. It is this block, totally out of scale with neighbouring housing, which now dominates. All that remains of the church is the altar, the tubular bells and stained glass high up on the left in the entrance lobby of St Mark with St Margaret, and another stained glass window, set in a box in the school.

The vicarage in Vicarage Park became once again a private house.

Plumstead Common Balloon Site. run from a commandeered house towards the south end of the terrace. The balloon site was on the Common immediately across the road. A crew was made up to man the site twenty four hours at a time. The cooks occupied another house further down to the left. The balloon site itself consisted of a perimeter wire supported at intervals by stakes to which the tail of the balloon was tethered by a pulley. The main cable of the balloon was fixed to a pulley in the centre. When the wind veered the tail pulley had to be moved to the appropriate section of the perimeter wire. If the wind became very strong the balloon was tethered to the ground by ropes from the rigging to concrete blocks. The main cable was led along the ground and onto a whim on the winch operated by a petrol engine on a trailer. There was also a stack of bottles of hydrogen with which the balloon was filled. The gas pressure was checked daily and topped up as necessary."

The Shree Kutch Satang Swaminarayan Temple. This building, which is adjacent to St Margaret's Church of England Primary School and was previously used as a Territorial Army drill hall and rifle range, became a Temple in August 1988. Its opening was marked by a large procession from Woolwich, along Plumstead Common Road and Blendon Terrace. Festivals take place in August each year and at Diwali in late October. The building was completely re-designed for its changed use and is an attractive feature today

Tilice Road.  (Not on AZ)


Tormount Street.

Vambery Road

Vernham Road

Waverley Crescent

19

53-57 Plumstead almshouses.  Instituted by Colonel E Hughes MP Trustees Robert Low, Esq., Thomas Nelson Moors Esq., Frances Alfred White, Henry Frederick Driver Esq. This stone was laid by Thomas Nelson Moors Esq. 4 July 1896 A.H.Kersey Architect Builder J.B.Sandford & Co.

The Lodge. Corner of St.John's Terrace. Fine Victorian building a distinctive landmark on the common.

The Stables which adjoins The Lodge is actually sited inside the fenced Council Yard.

The Ship on the corner of Wernbrook Street. In the 1990s called ‘Commoners Rest’ for a while

Waverley Road

2 Rose Inn

10

48

Wall of Kent Waterworks

Wernbrook Road,

Wrottesley Road

1

2-4

7


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