Saturday, 29 August 2009

The London/Surrey boundary. Chipstead Valley Road

London/Surrey boundary. Chipstead Valley Road
TQ 29208 59466

Suburban area still trying to be countryside.


The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary goes from the footpath north across Chipstead Valley Road up Sandown Road and across the railway. North up the west side of Lyndhurst Road and then east along the southern edge of Prospect Plantation and at the end it meets the boundary with the London Borough of Sutton.
The London/Surrey/Sutton boundary then turns north up the east side of the Plantation, crosses Mount and continues across the end of Corrigan Avenue.

Post to the north Woodmansterne
Post to the east Coulsdon
Post to the south Portnalls Road


Sites on the Surrey, Tandridge side of the border
Hatch Lane
Prospect Plantation

Sites on the London, Croydon side of the border

St. Andrews Road
Woodmansterne Station. Opened 17th July 1932 to meet the demand of new housing in the area. Between Smitham and Chipstead on Southern Rail. It was a simple island platform reached by a footbridge and the land was given for free by the builders.


Sources
Woodmansterne Residents. Web site
Woodmansterne Station. Wikipedia. Web site

The London Surrey boundary - skirting Cane Hill


The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary goes up Rickman Road turning west along the southern boundary of Rickman Hill Recreation Ground and then north up its west side to Page Hill where it follows a footpath north.
TQ 29062 59056

Suburban and countryside area on one of the steep valleys west of the A23 and railway lines coming out of Croydon.


Post to the north Chipstead Valley Road
Post to the east Cane Hill
Post to the south Millstock
Post to the west Chipstead

Sites on the Surrey Banstead side of the border
Chipstead
Means market place

How Lane
Woodlands Deer Farm
How Hills
White Hill

Sites on the London, Croydon side of the border
Coulsdon Lane
Coal post at the junction with Holmeoak Road, Portnalls Road, Rickman Hill Road and Hollymead Road

Portnalls Road
Portnalls

Rickman Hill Road
Knightsmead. A show place garden on heavy clay, designed for perfume and colour. It has spring bulbs, ferns and woodland plants; raised beds, water features, a conservatory and a glazed pergola.
Rickman Hill Recreation Field. bought by Coulsdon and Purley UDC in 1927. It has Mother Kitty’s Shaw in one corner

Whitethorn Avenue
Methodist Church
HA properties

Sources
Coal post. Web site
Croydon Council. Web site
Field. London Place Names
Surrey History

The London/Surrey boundary. Millstock

SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 28 58

The River Wandle- tributary the Bourne.
The western arm of the Bourne flows northwards towards the Wandle.

Post to the north Portnalls
Post to the east Dutch Village

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary comes Westwards across the A23 to go along the northern boundary of Starrock Wood but about half way along turns due north to cross Starrock Road to Hollymead Road



Sites on the Surrey, Banstead side of the boundaryHow Green – open space owned by Reigate Council

Starrock Lane
Rocious de Storocke seems to have lived here in 1265 might mean someone who lived by a high rock.

Starrock Green - open space owned by Reigate Council Starrock Wood

Vincents Green - open space owned by Reigate Council
Starrock Court Cottage

Starrock Court – big house built in 1868 built of flint on a flint foundation – very unusual..

Starrock Farm had land on both sides of Starrock Lane


Sites on the London Croydon side of the boundary

Millstock – the area is said to be the site of a mill listed in the Domesday Book. It would have been powered by a stream from Hooley, called the Bourne.
Pit for clay extraction now filled in

This material has been collected over many years and from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey Boundary. Brighton Road

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary down Drive Road westwards, crosses Woodplace Lane, and continues westwards across the northern boundary of Star Shaw to the A23.
TQ 29459 57431

A boundary area on the turnpike section of the Brighton Road marked by a City of London coal dues post. It also lay on the route of the Surrey Iron Railway.

Sites on the London, Croydon side of the boundary
Croydon, Merstham and Godstone tramway - Its route went southwards after Starrock Road the line crossed the Brighton Road, crossed the railway line and then crossed back again. By the time it reached Millstock it was back on the west side.

Post to the west Millstock
Post to the north Cane Hill
Post to the east Farthingdowns

Brighton Road
The Turnpike road from the junction of Woodfield Hill is on the line of an old cart track which curves eastwards as far as Hooley House to the south, but is straight northwards from here to Purley. The curve was corrected when the railway was built.
Coal dues obelisks south of Woodfield Hill and 150 yards north of the present boundary
Roadside Cafe Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway crossed on a bridge
Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway to the left of the road

Dutch Village
Built between the wars by a Dutch architect and modelled on a Dutch village


Sites on the Surrey, Banstead side of the boundary
Star Shaw

Woodplace Lane
A stretch of the lane as far as the turning into Netherlands are part of the Brighton turnpike road of 1840 which was changed following railway building.
Woodplace Farm – the farm fields in the ownership of the City Corporation following lobbying by local groups

Sources
Baylis's, Surrey Iron Railway
British History On line. Surrey
Coal Posts. Web site
Penguin. Surrey
Pevsner and Cherry. Surrey

The London/Surrey boundary.Farthingdown

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 30 58 Rural area as the road goes along the ridge of Farthingdown

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary goes up Ditches Lane At Farthingdown Cottages it turns west and then north up the boundary of the downland area.. It then turns west along Drive Road.

Sites on the London, Croydon side of the boundary

Post to the west Dutch Village
Post to the soiuth Devilsden


Chaldon Way
Hedgerow – ancient hedgerow runs all the way parallel to the road from Marlpit Lane to Drive Road. It has over 20 species in it and formed a boundary between the lower fields and the downs.

Drive Road
The road name used to be Driftway – as a farm track going to Tollers Farm
Tollers Farm
Driftway

Farthingdown
‘Farthing’ or’ Fairdean’ Downs. It is marked like this on the Ordnance Survey map of 1878, but simply ‘Farthing Downs’ on the 1816 map. It was earlier written ‘Ferthyngdoune’ 1322, ‘Ferthingdown’ 1549, ‘Farthing Downs’ c.1768. It comes from an Old English word meaning 'a fourth part or quarter of an estate'.
Field system and Saxon barrows. The lynchets and an ancient trackway can be seen in some light conditions in the fields on the side oi the road and on the road to Chaldon. west of the road are barrows which contained burials and their grave goods. The most prominent features are a series of anti-aircraft trenches dug during the Second World War.
This is an arc of anciently worked chalk downland and woods on a steep ridge. Farthing Down belonged to Chertsey Abbey but the survival Celtic fields and barrows show cultivation from the Neolithic period. Until this century the area was used for sheep grazing and then the City of London bought Farthing Down when it was threatened with enclosure. Much of the area is has an SSSI. The coarse grass on the chalk reflects the harsh conditions but there are also deep-rooted plants like knapweed and wild carrot. It is a major source of greater yellow rattle. The boundary hedges include eight species of ancient yew. Trees cover on the escarpment is mainly hawthorn. There are many butterflies. Foxes and badgers live here as do birds like nuthatch and treecreepers, kestrels and skylarks. .
Pit

This material has been collected over many years and from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey Boundary. The Devil's Den

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary goes up Ditches Lane
TQ301571

Very rural area as the road goes up the Gullett onto Farthingdown

Post to the north Farthingdown
Post to the east Happy Valley
Post to the south Chaldon


Sites on the boundary

Ditches Lane
Was previously Didges Lane
The Gullet
Figgs Wood private woodland
The Devil’s Den
Devilsden Wood. Acquired in stages by the council between 1937 and 1938 and leased for farming. It is dominated by oak with ash and wild cherry. Below the understorey are plants associated with ancient woodland like wood anemone, bluebells and lords and ladies. The are ancient yews. There is a chalk mine in the wood.
Sparklie Wood
Ditches Shows
Coal post east side of the lane near Devilsden

Sources
Chelsea Speleological Society. Newsletter
Coal Posts. Web site
London Borough of Croydon. Web site
Surrey County Council. Web site

The London/Surrey boundary. Chaldon


The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary comes westwards to Ditches Lane where it meets the boundary of the Reigate and Banstead District of Surrey. However, the London/Surrey /Croydon boundary turns north to follow Ditches Lane
TQ 31081 55308

A rural area with some scattered housing - but including an amazing old church

Post to the north Devilsden
Post to the east Chaldon

Sites on the Surrey, Tandridge side of the border

Chaldon
This plateau on the slope of the North Downs has a history of water scarcity. Before 1857 the water supply for Chaldon was at the bottom of White Hill and had to be carried up the slope using yokes and pails

Church Lane
Surrounding land belonged to the Church Glebe. 33 acres
The Rookery

Ditches Lane
St.Peter and St.Paul. A small church which might have been visited by travellers on the Pilgrims' Way. It is built of flint and dates from the late 12th with a tower and spire of 1843. It once had a bell with Lombardic inscription, believed to be the oldest in the country but it was stolen - there is a replica. Inside is a painting of hell –a purgatorial ladder with people ascending and descending; an angel waits above and a devil below, while St.Michael weighs the souls. The paints used were red and yellow ochre, cinnabar and whiteIt was painted about 1200, and later covered with whitewash, probably in the 1600s. Rediscovered in 1869 it was restored by the Surrey Archaeological Society. It is very rare, the subject chosen is very unusual and is a theme of Eastern European origin. There is a rare lizard oak pulpit of the mid 17th, and a plaque about the poor and needy.
Chaldon Court. Remains of a pre-Reformation house. Dates from 14th. Could be part of what was a much larger medieval house.
Court Farm.
Barns weather boarded 15th one is 18th the other 17th
Cowshed flint and long
Church Green – daffodils planted in memory of the Granville Wright family who lived at Hill Top Farm.

Sites on the Surrey, Banstead side of the boundary

Rook Lane
Furzewood Heath
Alderstead Heath - site of derelict Alderstead Fort
Coldblow. Medieval hall house. Redesigned c.1500.



Sources
Bourne Society. Web site
Chaldon Village Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. South London
Pevsner and Cherry. Sussex

TheLondon/Surrey Boundary Chaldon

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 31 56 a rural area with some scattered housing

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary comes down the eastern edge of Broad Wood and then turns west to cut across it and Piles Wood
TQ 31556 55140

Post to the west Chaldon
Post to the north Happy Valley


Sites on the Surrey, Tandridge side of the border

Church Lane
Glebe House, care home. 1760. It was the rectory until 1926. Extensions both modern and Victorian. Mathematical tiles covered by rendering. Some medieval timbers inside but most of the panelling is Victorian.
Modern garages on the site of what was the Rectory barn.
Glebe cottage – is said to include buildings of Rectory Farm.
Rectory Cottage used today as Parish Room. 1877.
Chinawan previously called Greenshawes timber clad house.
The Rookery with date plaque 1825 TET for Sir Thomas Tomkins. Maybe has medieval cellars. 19th with stucco walls

Doctor’s Lane
Fryern Broom Wood
Rectory 1926.

Leazes Avenue
The Leazes

Rook Lane
Village Hall Legrew Memorial Hall. Built after the First World War and there is a memorial stone to the Legrew family, who were the rectors of Chaldon and Caterham. The stone used to be by Didges Pond and was brought here when that was filled in.
Goswell Cottage. 19th with diamond pane windows
School 1871 now a house
Rook Cottage with thatched roof and exposed timber framing from late 16th . It was originally wattle and daub, replaced with Merstham stone.
Rook farm – 18th flint house. Flint wall.
Barn. Timber framed and thatched. 17th using medieval timbers.
Chaldon Mead. Was previously New Farm and used as an annexe to St.Lawrence’s Hospital. It was once part of Fryern Farm.
The Gables 19th house with diamond panes. Didges pond used to be behind the Gables

Sources Bourne Society. Web site
Chaldon Village Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. South London
Pevsner and Cherry. Sussex


The London/Surrey boundary. Happy Valley

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 31 57 A rural area with scattered housing on the edge of common land

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary. The boundary follows the south eastern edge of Coulsdon Common and then turns north west to meet the eastern edge of The Noswells. It then turns south east and crosses woodland and turns south west along the curved south edge of a belt of woodland.It then follows the eastern edge of Broad Wood

Post to the west Devilsden
Post to the east Caterham Barracks
Post to the south Chaldon


Sites on the London, Croydon side of the boundary
Broadwood

Coulsdon Common
The Common is marked on the Ordnance Survey map of 1816. The threat of enclosure led to it being taken over by the Corporation of London in the early 1880s.

Happy Valley
Some of the grounds of the original Parson’s Pightle used in the park. Taken over in 1937 under green belt legislation and assembled and renamed Happy Valley in 1970 – it had been the Coulsdon Green Belt Lands. The whole park is 250 acres with Happy Valley in the centre. Grazing once ad controlled the scrub but this stopped in 1937 and although in the 1950s some was leased to a farmer the scrub became invasive but was cleared in the 1960s. Today it is cut and trees are coppiced. On the western boundary are some large yews. It has been designated a SSSI.

Old Fox Close
The Fox . Pub on this site from at least 1720.

Piles Wood. Dominated by oak with ash and wild cherry. In the understorey is ground plants associated with ancient woodland like wood anemone, bluebells and lords and ladies.

The Noswells
The Noswells Farm Cottage

Sites on the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary

Dean Hill
Nuclear bomb store

Magazine Road
Happy Valley Golf Course

This material has been compiled over many years and from a wide variety of sources

Monday, 24 August 2009

The London/Surrey boundary. Coulsdon Common

The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary. The boundary goes down the south eastern edge of Coulsdon Common
TQ 32632 56915

An area of urban Caterham with new housing on the barracks site and open land on Coulsdon Common

Post to the west Happy Valley
Post to the north Kenley Aerodrome

Sites on the Surrey,Tandridge side of the boundary

Barracks for Guards Recruits
Guards Depot opened in 1877 in a surprisingly leafy area. Built to train soldiers from the regiments which made up the Brigade of Guards – and was the largest Victorian army depot. The design of Caterham followed many reports on better conditions for soldiers. Lots of space to try out new ideas. Florence Nightingale was involved and there was also an allowance for recreation. Caterham is the only example of a Type One Barracks. Its job was transferred to Pirbright in 1966 and abolished in 1993
Infantry camp adjacent in the Great war
Skaterham Skate park – in the Guards Chapel by Butterfield. 1881. polychromatic. Whole area now redeveloped.

Ninehams Road
Coal post outside 122 on the present Croydon/Tandridge boundary.

Sites on the London, Croydon side of the boundary

Coulsdon Common
Open landscape linking Farthing Down and Happy Valley. The common is mostly wooded and crossed by mown rides, which are planted with exotic trees. Like the other commons in this area it was bought by the City of London in 1883. Vegetation reflects the underlying chalk soil- there is oak and silver birch in the south and the larger trees are widely spaced which may show that this was once open grazed land. The rest of the common is covered with oak, wild cherry, ash and lime with an understorey of hazel coppice. Ground flora includes of bluebells, wood anemone, wood sorrel and male ferns and pale violets.
Mill Farm was opposite the mill on Coulsdon Common and near Cruft’s Kennels.

Coulsdon Road
Coal post on Coulsdon Common opposite The Grove

Westway
Was originally called Asylum Road

Sources
Coal posts. Web site
Croydon Council. Web site
Osborne. Defending London.
Smythe, Citywildspace
Tandridge Council. Web site

The London/Surrey boundary. Caterham on the Hill


The London/Surrey/Croydon boundary goes along Kenley Close and turns south down Gauntlet Gardens and then south west to follow the edge of Coulsdon Common as far as Stites Hill Road.
TQ 32298 57705

Suburban area surrounding common land and on the edge of the airfield

Post to the east Kenley Common
Post to the south Caterham Barracks

Sites on the London, Croydon side of the border

Barnfield
This was named like this as a field name on farmland

Caterham Road
Rydons Wood. A section of a ancient woodland, which was traditionally coppiced – and some of which is now being done by volunteers.

Hayes Lane
139 The Old Forge. listed
Kenley Airport - Opened as an AAP in 1917 with 14 large hangars it became a permanent RAF station in 1920s. It was Sector HQ for the Battle of Britain and was extensively bombed and also hit by V1s. The RAF ceased flying here in 1966 but uses the site for gliders. There are married quarters, mess buildings, etc.Memorial to those who served at RAF Kenley.It was unveiled in 2001 and stands within a restored fighter pen

Waterhouse Lane
Kenley Observatory – owned by local astronomy society
Waterhouse Farm. The land stretched from where Kenley Airport is to the Waddington Arms.


Sources
British Listed Buildings. Web site
London Borough of Croydon. Web site
Osborne. Defending London
Pevsner and Cherry. South London

The London/Surrey boundary. Kenley Common

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 33 58 Suburban housing, on the slopes of the Caterham Valley rising to common land around the old airfield

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary goes along the boundary of Kenley Common and then follows the boundary of the airfield. It turns west and goes along Kenley Close.

Post to the west Caterham on the Hill
Post to the north Whyteleafe Station
Post to the east Wapses Lodge

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary

Church Road
Bryngwyn Farm

Salmons Lane
Air-Raid Shelters south east of Kenley aerodrome there is a triangular grass area between, Salmons Lane, Salmons Lane West and Whyteleafe Hill. During WWII there were temporary huts used by the RAF and also a public air-raid shelter. It may be that the shallow mounds visible in this area are the site of the air-raid shelters.

Torwood Lane
Blize Wood

Whyteleafe Hill
Coxes Wood
Joysons Hill
Flintfield House

This material has been compiled over many years and from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Whyteleafe Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 33 59 An area of suburban housing on the west slope above the A22 and skirting Kenley Common and the airfield

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
Having crossed Godstone Road the boundary follows the railway line south until just before Whyteleafe Station. It then turns south west and skirts the ends of Hornchurch Hill to the south and Mosslea Road, Beverley Road and Hilltop Road to the north. It continues south west curving round the northern edge of Kenley Common, running between it and the airfield and turning south with it.

Post to the north Rose and Crown Pit
Post to the south Kenley Common

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the border
Godstone Road
A22. this is the old Lewes Road the ancient road into Sussex.
121 Electricity sub station 1924 11Kv receiving supply from Wandsworth
The Bourne crosses from the east side to the west side of Godstone Road opposite the football ground. It is in a culvert but there is a small open section before it reaches the railway, which it crosses
Kenley Common
80 acres of common land, open but including woods. It runs along the west flanks of the Caterham Valley. It is the smallest of the commons managed by the City of London. It is is marked as ‘common’ on Rocque's map of 1765.

Station Road St.Thomas RC Church. 1961 with aluminium spire.

Whyteleaf Hill
The Bourne crosses the road having crossed the railway in a culvert. It briefly appears in an open channel west of the station. It then re-crosses the Godstone Road. It then passes under a house and a garage in pipes.Coal Tax Post In Well Farm . Road at bottom of bank on north side just below viaduct. Almost completely buried.
Whyteleaf station. 1900. Between Kenley and Whyteleafe South on Southern Trains In a quarry. Neolithic flint bits found there. Small brick station with level crossing on the Caterham Railway. Built 1855 to run from Caterham to Godstone Road in Purley.
Coal Tax Post a few metres north east of junction with Hornchurch Hill. It is a rusty post with an intact inscription and not too far from the former Greater London Boundary.
Small Concrete War-Time Structures of Unknown Purpose. These are small rectangular concrete structures with peepholes and wooden doors. Until 1993 there was a site in Whyteleafe Hill adjacent to the still standing coal tax post.
St. Luke's church.Font made of a block of chalk from the quarry
Churchyard. This contains war graves with memorial stones of the type designed for the War Graves Commission on the western front. The graves are of airmen from Kenley and a significant proportion died in the Battle of Britain year 1940. There are other types of head stones mainly to airmen who died before WWII as the result of accidents
Whyteleafe House Hostel
Library
School

Whyteleafe Residential district and station named from a field recorded as ‘White Leaf Field’ in 1839, apparently so called from the aspens that grew there.

On the London, Croydon side of the border
Kenley
The name uses the same personal name found in ‘Kennington’ although probably not the same actual person. It is ‘Kenele’ 1255, ‘Kente’ 1403. ‘Kenelee’ 14th century, ‘Kenley’ 1548, that is ‘ woodland clearing of a man called Cena'. It is part of the medieval parish of Waddington - or Watendone or Wattenden - where Kenley was just the name of a lane and a farm.

Kenley Aerodrome. part of Kenley Common was compulsorily acquired under the Defence of the Realm Act (DORA) in 1917 despite public protest. At first it was an Aeroplane Acceptance Park - parts were delivered in crates from the nearby rail stations and planes were assembled and tested before delivery for service in France. between 1931 and 1934, it was rebuilt by local contractor, J B Edwards as a fighter station. Concrete runways had been laid by 1939 and used in the Battle of Britain in 1940 when it was HQ B sector in No II fighter group covering the area from London to Shoreham and to Pevensey. It was badly bombed on 18 August 1940 by low flying German Dorniers and junkers Ju88 dive-bombers. After this the sector operations building was transferred to Spice and Wallis's butcher's premises at 11 Godstone Road. The aerodrome received information from Stanmore if necessary. "Blitz". Fighters flew from here to meet enemy raids heading for LondonAfter the war the runways were too short for jet fighters and it was closed in 1959 except for use by the Air Training Corps for gliding but remained the property of the Ministry of Defence. It is the last Battle of Britain station to survive in World War II form. There is a grass bank for blast bay for spitfire shelter. The officers’ mess and ops huts are still there but the sector operations building was demolished in 1980 and much of the open space was transferred to the City of London for public access.
The officers mess closed in 1974 but taken over in 1980 by the Home Office. Because it is an area of relatively low electrical interference it was become converted to a Radio Technology Laboratory by 1982 and handed to the Board of Trade.
The Station HQ stands and the parade ground with a flagpole base still in place.
Officers married quarters
Flying butts
Fighter pen


Mosslea Road
Whyteleafe Business Village

Stumps Lane
Pit

This material is compiled over many years and from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey boundary.Godstone Road Whyteleafe

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 33 60 an area of housing and commercial development along the A22

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary has come in a south west wards direction but then reaches a path, which has come from Honister Heights. The boundary joins the path at the point at which it turns south and then joins it. When the path reaches a T junction the boundary turns west along it. It follows the path past a chalk pit to the railway. It crosses the railway and then turns south to follow the line and turns west again to go south of a disused gas works and skirt the end of Downsway. It crosses Godstone Road and turns south.

Post to the west Kenley
Post to the east Tithepit
Post to the south Whyteleafe


On the London, Croydon side of the border
Godstone Road
A22 As far as the Rose and Crown this is the bypass road built in 1790 but then it is the old Lewes Road, the ancient road into Sussex.
Bourne Park - used to be Kenley Recreation Ground. Laid out as a park with paddling pool and so on by Coulsdon and Purley UDC in 1921.
The Bourne river flows undermeath the road.

Hawkhirst Road

Riddlesdown Road The road comes down off Riddlesdown. The Roman London to Portslade Roman road passed through the Godstone Gap in the North Downs but in the 19th some of it was rebuilt to the west as the A22 - about 1790 when the new road was built from Purley to the Rose and Crown. Both roads go through an area worked for chalk and firestone. The original Roman road is now a sunken track but in 1585 it was still used to carry iron and charcoal from the Weald. The Roman road passed over Riddlesdown on the east side of the Caterham valley. Riddlesdown itself was acquired by the City Corporation as a resultion to a Chancery case. This case partially concerned common land of the Manor of Kenley which was adjacent to the Riddlesdown Chalk Pit.
Rose and Crown. The pub name symbolises the union of York and Lancaster in the marriage of Henry VI and Elizabeth of York. In 1804 member of the Royal Jennerian Society held a vaccination session here.It was first called ‘the Rose’ and built in 1723. demolished to become flats.
Rose and Crown Chalk Pit. In use until the 1960s. A cottage for quarry worker still there. The rail bridge goes over the chalk bed, cutting diagonally. The pit faces South West and is jagged with terraces and slopes – it can be seen most dramatically from roads on the western slopes of the valley. Rosebay willow herb and ragwort have a foothold on its terraces that also support species typical of old chalk grassland including bee and pyramidal orchid and a large colony of common spotted orchid. Rare white mullein and yellow mullein grow on the pit floor. There is a pond, surrounded by scrub, which supports a breeding population of toads, and there are also common lizards and slow worms. Small blue butterflies rely on its the kidney vetch, which grows on the spoil heaps and there are other rare butterflies.
Rail Bridge. A lattice girder viaduct on brick piers built by the joint LBSCR/SER line to Oxted. It goes across a chalk pit.
The Gorse
Gas Works built by the Caterham and Kenley Gas Company. The works was built with second hand materials and become the Caterham and District Gas Works. The Whyteleaf Gas holder is nearby. Begun in 1869 and taken over by Croydon who pulled down the existing holders but erected the present one in 1953.


On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the border
New Barn Lane
Kenley Primary School – set up as Kenley Church of England Primary School in 1885 . it was then on Godstone Road opposite the waterworks and had 97 children. A new school was set up in New Barn Lane in 1936 but because there was no airraid shelter on the old church school site they were moved to this site too

Old Barn Lane
At one time this was Gas House Lane

This material is compiled over many years and from many sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Tithepit

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 34 60 An area of some countryside and suburban housing

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary emerges from the northern side of the pond from the east and crosses Limpsfield Road. It goes a short distance parallel but north of Shaw Lane and then turns abruptly north west to run up the west side of Princes Avenue. It crosses Clyde Avenue and goes south westwards some distance above but paralled to the northern boundary of Clyde Avenue. It crosses a footpath from Shaw Lane and then goes round the southern edge of Dipsey’s Shaw and continues south west.

Post to the west Rose and Crown Pit
Post to the east Hamsey Green

On the London, Croydon side of the boundary
Ansley Berry Shaw – woodland area. It has overgrown bramble areas with some wild cherry.

Dipsley’s Shaw - open pasture grassland

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary
Tithepit Lane
Warlingham School. A business and enterprise specialist school
Hamsey Green Junior School .opened in May 1949 with 170 children.
Warlingham Court Farm - caravan site
Batts Farm

The Dobbin
The Dobbin. It was covered with whitebeams after whose silvery leaves the area was named. There was an engine here which hauled up buckets of sewage to be dumped here. Cavern found here in 1963 during the building of a new roadway. It is thought that this was a denehole.
The Tithepit was an open quarry on the east side of the road and there was a tradition that taxpayers could take chalk from it. Considered likely that it was very ancient.

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Hamsey Green

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 35 60 A rural area with a lot of ribbon developed suburban housing

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary goes south from Mossyhill Shaw and then runs south west along the northern boundary of Moseshill Shaw. At the north west corner of the wood it turns north west to reach Kingswood Lane which it follows until the junction with Mead Way when it turns north west to go round the pond

Post to the west Tithepit

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary
Crewe’s Lane
Crewe’s Wood
Crewe’s House

Hamsey Green
Hamsey Green Farmhouse. 1700 gone
Good Companions Pub. 1930s roadhouse style. Demolished
Hamsey Green Pond –believed to be Neolithic. Mentioned since 13th in records as ‘Wychemere’ for watering cattle.

Moseshill Shaw

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Farleigh Court Road

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 36 61 An area of farms, woods and scattered housing

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary reaches the south eastern tip of Beeches Shaw going south and then continues on the same line to the edge of Mossyhill Shaw which it crosses and on the southern side turns due west.

Post to the north Selsdon Wood

Farleigh
Isolated hamlet partly scattered about a large green and enclosed by woodland. Here in the middle ages wood was grown as standards – mature oak and beeches grown above the coppice. This is a traditional Surrey practice to meet the demand for firewood from London and also provide timber for shipbuilding etc. It was an estate of Merton College, Oxford.

Farleigh Court Road
Moray Bank
The Chestnuts

Farleigh Road
Elm Farm. Perfect farmstead but no elms.Listed
Moorcroft
Dean Bottom shaw
Hogcroft Shaw
Hodge Grove
Great Farleigh Green. Conservation area
Oaken Grove
Chalgrove
Farleigh House Farm

The London/Surrey boundary. Old Farleigh Road

A square by square look at the London

TQ35 62 An area of woodland and housing

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon. The boundary comes to the edge of Hillocks Wood and crosses Farleigh Road and then turns due south going towards Beeches Shaw.

Post to the east Selsdon Wood


On the London, Croydon side of the boundary
Hillocks Wood
Part of the area bought by Cresswell in 1924

Old Farleigh Road
Croydon High School for Girls. Opened in 1964 on this site. Large and in a hard style. The original school was founded in 1874 in Wellesley Road, Croydon, and is a Girl’s Day School Trust school.
Selsdon Park Hotel. Medieval castle built in the 19th and which used to be castellated. It was built by George Sutton MP and enlarged in 1925. It was owned by a series of wealthy men who used the surrounding woods for shooting.. it is was turned into a hotel in 1924, the golf club was added in 1929 and it acquired its Neo-Jacobean appearance in 1935.

Selsdon Hill

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Selsdon Woods

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 36 62 An area largely covered by woodland

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary crosses the southern edge of Bears Wood Scout Camp and continues west to the end of Court Wood Lane. It then turns south west to follow Baker Boy Lane as far as the edge of Puplet Wood when it curves away to the west and runs between Broom Wood and Broom Shaw following the southern edge of Hillocks Wood on a path named Farleigh Border.

Post to the west Farleigh Road
Post to the South Farleigh Court Road
Post to the east Farleigh Dean



On the London, Croydon side of the boundary
Selsdon Woods,
This had been part of the Selsdon Estate which had been used for hunting and shooting; It had been part of Selsdon Farm, sited further north but had become a shooting estate for various wealthy owners. However in the 1920s new owner began to cut the timber - It includes ancient woodland plus conifer and beech plantations with areas of open grassland. the Croydon Natural History and Scientific Society and the Surrey Garden Village Trust raised money for purchase. And in 1936 200 acres was handed over to the National Trust and opened by the Lord Mayor who lived locally. The woods and open land attracts at least 62 species of birds such as nuthatches, woodpeckers, treecreepers and tawny owls. Small mammals such as shrews, voles and mice have been recorded as well as weasels, badgers and Chinese muntjac deer.
Court Wood, is dominated by oak with hazel shrub. In the spring there is wood anemone and bluebells. An area of ash-maple woodland has a hazel understorey with common and midland hawthorn, crab apple and spindle while the ground flora includes wood spurge, dog's mercury, primrose, goldilocks and the purple and twayblade orchids. Larch , spruce and beech have taken place since 1969 on the advice of LB Croydon.
Steven's Larch was planted sometime before the First World War and harvested during the Second World War.
Selsdon Nature Reserve. This site was part of Selsdon farm in the ‘Croydon Crook’ area and throughout the 19th was owned by the Smith family. coppicing was undertaken until the Second World War but the wide rides indicate that the wood was managed for game cover too.
Broom Wood from 1924 owned by Cresswell
The Gorse from 1924 owned by Cresswell



On the Surrey, Tanderidge side of the boundary
Puplet Wood - Puplet is someone’s name
Broom Shaw from 1924 owned by Cresswell
Hagglers Dean

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

Farleigh Dean

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ37 62 an area of fields and woods and scattered housing

The boundary continues north west in Frylands Wood running parallel to Featherbed Lane. At the edge of the wood and the Bungalow it turns west and crosses Farleigh Dean and then goes along the edge if Frith Wood with Addington Court Old Golf Course to the north, also crossing a path between Featherbed Lane and Farleigh Court Road. It then reaches the southern boundary of Bears Wood Scout Camp.

Post to the west Selsdon Woods
Post to the east Featherbed Lane

On the London, Croydon side of the boundary
Farleigh Dean Crescent

Featherbed Lane
Frylands WoodFrith Wood

Farleigh Dean
Bears WoodAddington Court Golf courseThe Bungalow

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

The London/Surrey boundary.Fickleshole

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 38 61 An area of farmland and woods

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary crosses Featherbed Lane and continues south west between Chapel Wood and Coldblow Shaw and Then, following the edge of the wood, it turns abruptly north west and continues in that direction, crossing a path and then along the edge of Crab Wood. At the end of that wood it meets a path and then another but continues in its north west direction on the eastern edge of Frylands Wood parallel but some way to the west of Featherbed Lane.

Post to the north Featherbed Lane
Post to the east Skid Hill



On the Kent, Tandridge, side of the border

Farleigh Court Road
Little Farleigh Green Farm. Riding school.
Scotshall Farm

Featherbed Lane
Crab Wood
Coldblow Shaw
Chapel Hill
Chapel Bank Nature Reserve is a west facing slope and valley. It has a lot of recreational use and encroachment from scrub so the character has changed. It has suffered from motorcycles and landrovers running down the hillside. It was grazed by sheep which encouraged short grass However rabbit grazing has continued and the grassland has carline thistles, wild thyme, sheep fescue, milkwort and man and twayblade orchids hawthorn and dogwood scrub grow with sanicle, primrose, moschatel, woodruff, violets and yellow archangel. At least 21 butterfly species have been recorded including brimstones, small tortoiseshells and meadow browns, and the dark green fritillary, white letter hairstreak and dingy skipper. foxes and badgers live as well as with slow worms, and common lizards..
Bograms Wood
Fairchildes Farm

Fickleshole
Hamlet with farming.
The White Bear. This was once a terrace of cottages with just a small pub at the end. The original bear came from an auction at the Criterion, Picccadilly in 1905 but was stolen by Canadian soldiers in the Second World War. This one is concrete.

High Hill Road
Beechfield Wood
Ebbutts Shaw
Great Hill Shaw

Park Road
Fickleshole Farm. flint and red brick

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Featherbed Lane

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 38 62 rural roads on the edge of the down market New Addington Estate

Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
The boundary goes west parallel to Fairchildes Avenue along Gushybank Shaw but curves south around the edge of the shaw and goes across the top of Three Corner Grove, down its south side and crosses Featherbed Lane going south west.

Post to the west Farleigh Dean
Post to the east New Addington
Post to the south Fickleshole

On the London, Croydon side of the border
Fairchildes Avenue
Gushybank Shaw

Featherbed Lane
The name might imply it had a soft surface
Hutchinson's Bank, Nature Reserve. Chalk downland with scrub . It is South West slope with a lot of recreational use. It used to be grazed by sheep but now hawthorn Scrub has swamped much of the chalk grassland. However, some small clearings and glades survive which has scented and brightly coloured herbs including burnet saxifrage, lady's bed-straw, hairy St John's wort, marjoram, and field scabious. small blue butterfly lives on kidney vetch found towards the bottom of the bank and there are orchids on the well-drained sunny slope
Threecorner grove – between Hutchinson’s and Chapel Banks. A small stand of ancient woodland of oak and hazel with wild garlic and bluebells
Pit
Peartree Farm Cottage
Coal post west side north of Fickleshole. gone

Homestead
School

This material has been compiled over many years and from many different sources

The London/Surrey boundary.New Addington borders

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 39 62 While the eastern part of the square is wholly rural the western part covers some of the down market New Addington Estate.

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary runs north from Fairchildes but before the crossing with Sheepbarn Lane it turns sharp west to the edge of the playing fields of Addington High School at Gushybank Shaw and here joins the Croydon boundary.
Boundary London/Surrey/Croydon
From the Bromley boundary the line goes due west into the school grounds and then turns at a right angle north to the school building. It then turns west again to reach Fairchildes Avenue.

Post to the west Featherbed Lane
Post to the south Skid Hill

On the border
Skid Hill Lane
Coal post west side 100 yards south of the junction with King Henrys Drive, Layhams Road and Sheep Barn Lane

On the London, Bromley side of the border
Sheepbarn lane
Coal post north side of the lane, 150 yards south of the junction with king henrys drive layhams road and sheep barn lane

Layhams Road
West Wickham reservoir
Hoppershatch Shaw – means 'wood by Hopper's gate'—either a gate to a farm or to an enclosed wood.

On the London, Croydon side of the border
King Henry's Drive
Coal post - a boundary post put up by the City of London to indicate the area within which coal and wine tax should be paid to them. On the sw side se of junction with Fairchildes and ne of junction with Layhams Road, Sheep Barn Lane and Skid Hill Lane
Addington High School – specialist performing arts school
Fairchildes Primary School
This material has been collected over many years from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Skid Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 39 61 A rural area

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary continues northwards up Skid Hill with a slight kink as it follows Fairchildes.

Post to the north New Addington borders

On the border
Skid Hill Lane (Boundary Road)
Line of Roman Road
Fairchildes School
Blackman’s Cottage
Fairchildes Cottages

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the border
Blackmans Lane
Cox’s Cottage

On the London/Bromley side of the border
Fairchildes Lane
Fairchildes Farm


This material has been collected over many years from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Skid Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 39 60 Rural area

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary continues straight up Skid Hill Lane

Post to the north Skid Hill
Post to the east Crown Ash Lane

On the boundarySkid Hill Lane
Crooked Dash Shaw



On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary
Church Lane
Church Cottages

Rail Pit Lane

On the London, Bromley side of the boundary
Fairchildes Road
Honeyoak Wood - could mean there are beehives here, or just a nice wood, or sticky clay soil


This has been compiled over many years from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Crown Ash Lane

Rural area between Biggin Hill and New Addington
Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary continues to run northwards emerging from Mollards Wood. At Crown Ash Lane it turns west going at an angle slightly north of the lane to reach Skid Hill Lane.
TQ 4012859852

Countryside area surrounding patches of housing developments


Post to the west Skid Hill
Post to the south Norheads Lane

On the border
Crown Ash Lane

On the London, Bromley side of the border

Norheads Lane
Norheads Farm. Red brick farmhouse with 1715 on the date stone. Listed but It has been conversted to offices. There has been a farm at Norheads since Norman times. The old spelling of the word was ‘Norrads’. It was built for John Glover and shows the prosperity of the farm. fire marks issued by early insurance companies are fixed to the outside of the house. The Mormon family of Bromley Common owned the farm in the late 1880s.

Skid Hill
Skid hill House
Skid hill farm. The farm includes an SSSI where neglected grassland has been restored to chalk grassland with bee and pyramid orchids, yellow rattle, deer abnd buzzards

Sources
London Borough of Bromley. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. South London

The London/Surrey boundary. Norheads Lane

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 40 59 an area so rural it is difficult to believe it is London

Boundary London/SurreyBromley
The boundary continues in a north west straight line with a slight kink as it enters a belt of woodland at the south end of Mollards Wood, which it crosses on its western edge. At the northern edge of the wood the boundary veers slightly to the east before again going northwards.

Post to the north Crown Ash Lane
Post to the east Biggin Hill
Post to the south Beddlestead


On the boundary

Footpath on Roman Road – the Peckham to Lewes highway Mollards Wood

On the London,Bromley side of the boundary
Beech Road
Long Coppice.protection order on it since 1984

Norheads Lane
Jerry Reddins Shaw

This has been compiled over many years from a wide variety of sources

The London/Surrey boundary. Beddlestead

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary goes north west in a straight line. It crosses a footpath which goes between Bedlestead Lane Lusted Hall Lane and then along the west side of Shepherd’s Shaw, Cherry Tree Shaw, Round Wood and crosses Norheads Lane.
TQ 40162 57395

Agricultural area with scattered woodland. This feels very remote and it is surprise to find that most of the square is in London

Post to the north Norheads Lane
Post to the east Lusted Hall Lane
Post to the south Furze Corner

On the boundary
Footpath on Roman Road
The road is said to be between Watling Street at Peckham and Lewes. Here is crosses the North Downs.
Round Wood

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary
Beddlestead Lane
Beddlestead Farm Cottages
Culver Keys means cowslips

On the London, Bromley side of the boundary
Norheads Lane
Cherry Tree Shaw
Shepherd’s Shaw

Swievelands Hill Road
Home Wood

Sources
Map information only

The London/Surrey boundary. Tatsfield

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 57 40 Countryside on the edge of Tatsfield Village

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary continues south west down a footpath until it meets Tatsfield Approach Road at Furze Corner. It continues down Tatsfield Approach Road south and into a wood. At the end of the wood the boundary turns abruptly north west and continues in this direction


Post to the north Beddlestead

On the boundaryFootpath on Roman Road

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary
Beddlestead Lane
Wireless Station BBC transmitters
Aeriel Lighthouse. These were lighthouses to mark the route for aircraft. Established in 1922. it w3as 223 feet NNW of the BBC aeriels and was a flashing beacon, made by Plessey, and fired with acetelyne. Demolised before the Second World War. On the site there is a brick rectangle
Pitcher’s Goose Farm
Longlands Shaw
Transco Above Ground Installation for sampling calorific values of gas. Boiler houses, etc on site.


Tatsfield Approach Road
Furze Corner
Waylands farm Beaver Water World and Reptile Zoo
Beacon Shaw
Glengarry

Saturday, 22 August 2009

The London/Surrey Border - Tatsfield

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 58 41 scattered housing plus suburbia on the edge of the village of Tatsfield

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary continues south west down Lusted Hall Lane

The boundary continues on its down market way and then suddenly turns, down an lane heading for Surrey.


Post to the west Beddlestead
Post to the east South Street
Post to the north Biggin Hill

On the boundary
Lusted Hall Lane
Lusted Hall Farm
Kingscote
Cedar Lodge

On the Surrey, Tandridge side of the boundary
Goatsfield
Payne’s Field Coppice

Gorsey Down Farm

Kemsley Road
Isle Shaw

Paynesfield Road


Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. I would like to note some short histories of Biggin Hill and some web sites.

The London/Surrey Border - Pimlico - Biggin Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 59 41 Suburban and largely down market Biggin Hill

Boundary London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary goes north west from the east side of the kennels between The Grove and Ricketts Hill emerging at Eagles Drive. At the junction it turns sharply south west down Lusted Hall Lane.

Biggin Hill is what it is - and it is typical of this makeshift community around an airfield that the vicar had to buy a second-hand church and rebuild it himself. The boundary follows through.

Post to the west Norheads Lane
Post to the south Tatsfield



On the London, Bromley side of the border
Biggin Hill
Biggin Hill 'hill with or by a building' Middle English ‘ bigging’, Old English.

Church Road
St.Mark's. Built in 1957-9 with materials from the demolished Victorian church of All Saints, North Peckham. For the previous 50 years old worshippers had used an iron hut which the Minister, Rev. V. Symons, demolished and then rebuilt it all moving it in a lorry, bit by bit by himself. The original Peckham church had been designed by Giles Gilbert Scott in yellow brick It has a detached bell tower and the design has been governed by the need to re-use the old nave roof. All the windows were engraved by the vicar copying woodcuts from the early c15 German Biblia Pauperurn with a dentists drill. He also made the plate and altar cross in which there are 53 wedding rings.

Stock Hill
Two cottages

Kings Road
Flying Machine pub. Modern.

Lebanon Gardens
Named by developer Dougal after a road in Wandsworth

Lusted Lane
The boundary is an ancient road. 700 feet up.
Lusted was ‘Lovestedesdoune’ in 1402, ‘Lovested’ 1545, ‘Lusested’ 1552, ‘Lustead Farm’ 1819. This was probably -pasture or a farm of a man called Lufa'. However it is possible that it means. 'love', in which case it might refer to a pleasant place, or a 'morning gift' or dowry, or even somewhere secluded for lovemaking.
Parsons Shaw

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. I would like to note some short histories of Biggin Hill and some web sites.

The London/Kent and London/Surrey border South Street

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ58 42 An area of countryside, suburban housing and part of the village of Tatsfield

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley and London/Surrey/Bromley
The boundary goes north west and enters Painter’s Wood at the end of which it meets the Kent/Surrey boundary. It turns north to cross Avenue Road and goes north up Cudham Road. At the junction with Hillside Road it swings away west of Cudham Road while continuing to go west

Here Kent and Surrey meet - and the posher areas start. They don't start just yet however as the boundary tracks round the Biggin Hill/Tatsfield border.

Post to the west Tatsfield

On the Surrey/Tandridge side of the boundary
Avenue Road
Ashen Shaw
The Hermitage at one time this was a Gladstone Bag Factory
Sunnymead
Leacroft

Cudham Road
Painters Wood

Ricketts Hill Road
Manor House. C1700 red brick with flint.
Tatsfield Green

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. I would like to note some short histories of Biggin Hill and some web sites.

Thursday, 20 August 2009

The London/Kent Border - Westerham Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ43 57 The area around Westerham Hill as it climbs the face of the North Downs
Boundary London/Kent/Bromley

The boundary goes westward and traverses the southern edge of Broomcocks Wood. It continues westward and crosses Westerham Hill and on to a west bound footpath to Heights View. After a while it curves to turn north and crosses Chestnut Avenue and Tatsfield Lane and continues in a northwesterly direction.

The boundary turns up Westerham Hill back onto the Downs - and for next few square zig zags so that down market Biggin Hill is in London while posher Tatsfield remains in Surrey. Chestnut Avenue here is so posh you won't be able to get into it - but note 'Fort Cottages' and also note that this old fort is just one of many along the line of fortress North Downs.

Post to the east Westerham Hill

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the boundary

Chestnut Avenue
Reservoir
Pit
Little Betsom’s Farm
Fort Cottages a house built from the remains of a 19th fort. Timber stables and grounds
Mole End with mole and ratty mural
Heights View
Stone pillar marks the Kent surrey boundary

Palace Road
Top Croft

Tatsfield Lane

The Avenue

Highfield
Whitelands
Whitelands Shaw
Round Shaw


On the London, Bronmley side of the boundary

Grays Road
Broomcocks Wood

Westerham Hill
The Mount
Buckhurst Lodge. This residence was probably intended as a shooting lodge on the Cudham Manor estate. It was called ' Bokehurst' Lodge, on the map of 1699. The centre portion of the present building is Georgian with later additions at each end. In the early 1900's it was owned by Professor Lambert, a mathematician who lectured at Greenwich.
Hawleys Corner. Highest point in Kent.
Christian mission set up here in 1877 by Miss Thorneycroft, from a local farming family.
Spinning Wheel restaurant at the corner of Gray’s Road expanded from a tearoom and a tiny cottage is accommodation for the manager.
Westerham Heights Nursery.

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material.

Sunday, 16 August 2009

The London/Kent border Westerham Hill

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 44 57 An area of agricultural land beneath rolling hillside

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary proceeds westwards along a path to reach some woodland which it crosses and then runs along the edge of another length of wood, with another belt of woodland parallel to the south and crossing a path which comes from Gray’s Stud. The boundary continues westward.

The boundary has turned west at last and is heading parallel to the Pilgrim's Way and it predecessor tracks. This is an area of farmland which feels very empty and remot - despite the M25 and the odd bit of abandoned extractive industry. No wonder the Woolwich hid here in the War.

Post to the west Westerham Hill
Post to the east Hogtrough Hill
Post to the south Westerham London Road

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the border

Pilgrim House.used as headquarters by the Woolwich Building Society during the Second World War. May have had a link with John Groom’s Crippleage.

Westerham Hill
Deepdale
Deepdale Cottages
Lime Villa
Old quarry

On the London, Bromley side of the border
Silversted Lane
Grays Stud

Trackway

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material.

The London/Kent Boundary Brasted

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary leaves the south eastern corner of Joelands Wood and continues south west along a minor road. When the road turns north west the boundary continues forward along a footpath to a meeting of five paths and continues ahead in a south western direction.
TQ 45213 56893

The boundary is now going very sharply downhill to meet the Pilgrim's Way, and other ancient trackways which followed the line of the North Downs.  This is rolling north downs countryside with some houses, but mainly woods and fields

Post to the north The Nower
Post to the south Westerham Beggars Lane

On the Kent/Sevenoaks side of the border
Hogtrough Hill
Tip
Earthwork
Chalk pit

On the London, Bromley side of the border
Silverstead Lane
Blawan Orchard


The London/Kent boundary Cudham/Brasted

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary continues south down Cudham Lane South and on to The Nower. At the junction with Hogtrough Hill it turns sharply south west and goes parallel to but slightly north of a path to the south eastern edge of Joelands Wood.
TQ 45526 57311

An area of countryside and woodlands, with houses and farms owned by rich people. The boundary has begun to move downhill in an area of thick mysterious woodland - and old extractive sites.

Post to the north Horns Green
Post to the south Hogtrough Hill


On the border

Cudham Lane
South Scott’s Lodge. Was once called White Lodge. Rebuilt in 1904. It was believed the name was changed because it might be that the original house was built by a Ralph Scot in the 14th, but not really clear. Home of the Bailey family who bred ponies and had Ghurkha servants. Fairmead

The Nower
Rosemary Farm
The Nower – the name of a hanging wood on a very steep chalk slope. Suggested it has a connection with the word ‘North’.

On the London, Bromley side of the border

Cudham Frith
One of London’s botanically most diverse woods. It included fly orchid, helleorine and twyblade

Grays Road
Joelands Wood.  Acid beech wood with breeding marsh tits
Cudham Frith Farm
Joelands

Viewlands Avenue

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the border
Knockholt Main Road
Highman’s Wick
Laurel Cottage

Sources
London Borough of Bromley. Web site
Smithers. Knockholt

The London/Kent Border. Horns Green

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ 45 59 An area of scattered housing and woodlands
Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
From the edge of Broom Wood the boundary goes south to then run on the western edge of Little Jockey’s Wood at Horns Green and there crosses a footpath. It continues south with a slight deviation to the west and zig zags to join Cudham Lane South soon after Portlands and continue down it.

The boundary has now reached near the top of the escarpment, although you would never know it, and is beginning to turn downhill. More posh housing disguised as farms, and some not disguised at all.


Post to the north Letts Green
Post to the south The Nower

On the border
Cudham Lane South
Portlands. Listed group which includes an oast house and drying shed. Also stable buildings and a cottage. Built c.1840 but the stucco house has its back to the road. At the rear is an 18th wing in brick and flint. Oast is early 19th with a drying shed used as a stable. There is a flight of steps up the side of the oast to link with an encircling wall, all in brick and flint. The whole, with the cottage and the stables form a square round a courtyard. All listed.

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the border
Burlings Lane
Baston Wood
Burlings. Listed outhouse and garden wall north of Burlings Cottage. Early 19th outbuildings in flint and rubble with red brick vertical bands,
Burlings Cottage. Late 18th cottage.listed. one storey plus a basement. Four steps with an ornamental cast iron railing. Garage extension.
Franklow. Late 19th cottage with flint rubble walls and red brick dressings. Listed.

Horns Green
Marked thus on maps of 1821 and 1871, to be associated with the family of John de Horne 1292, whose name derives from Old English horn 'a horn-shaped feature, a projecting piece of land'.
The most southeasterly point in London. Part of the holdings of the Earl of Derby. Sold by the 17th earl in 1909.

Knockholt Wood

Royal Oak Hill
Royal Oak

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. In this area I would like to mention an excellent history of Knockholt by David Waldron Smithers.

The London/Kent boundary Knockholt/Cudham borders

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary leaves New Year’s Lane when it is crossed by two paths between New Year’s Wood and Birches Croft. It follows a path through New Year’s Wood eventually taking an eastern fork to go to Cacket’s Lane. At the lane it goes sharp south and continues south skirting the western edge of Broom Wood.
TQ 4591959305



The boundary continues through more ancient countryside - housing here is scattered and despite its rural feel has for the last hundred years or so provided homes for the wealthy.
an area of woodland and agricultural land


Post to the south Horns Green

On the London, Bromley side of the border

Cacket’s Lane
Cacket’s Farm. Sold in 1927 after Maconochie’s death to a AW.Smithers.

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the border

New Year’s Lane
Letts Green
Broom wood
Letts Green Farmhouse. Early 19th refacing of a timber framed older house. Flint walls with red brick dressings.

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry. Kent
Pevsner and Cherry. South London
Smithers. Knockholt

The London/Kent Boundary - Cudham/Halstead borders

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary leaves Perry’s Lane to follow Washney’s Lane and then New Year’s Lane.
TQ 46983 61085

An area of Woodland. The boundary again goes down country lanes which seem ancient and remote from the modern world. Here I recently saw real wild deer jumping about in a road which was actually inside the London boundary.


Post to the east Halstead

On the boundary

New Year’s Lane
The area around the lane – including Newlands Wood and Washneys was sold in 1909 by the Earl of Derby to A.W.Machonocie – an early producer of tinned food. It was again sold in 1927 to Smithers.

Washney’s Lane
At the boundary the name has changed from Perry’s Lane to this
The Washneys. Common land
Newlands Wood
Hayman’s Wood

Sources
Smithers, Knockholt

The London/Kent boundary - Halstead

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON
TQ47 61 An Area of woodland and agricultural land

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary follows the western edge of Lower Randle’s Wood and then turns sharp west to join a path which crosses Birchingbank Wood. At the other side of the wood it turns south down the boundary of the wood to join Perry’s Hill. which it follows westward.

Post to the west Washneys
Post to the north Pratt's bottom

On the boundary
Perry’s Lane
The name of the lane changes at the boundary to Stubbs Hill
Perry Wood
Birchingbank Wood

On the Kent, Sevenoaks side of the boundary
Deerleap Lane
South Lodge. Early mid 19th lodge cottage. L shaped but with a modern extension.

Randle’s Lane
Lower Randle’s Wood

Rushmore Hill
New Stables FarmRushmore Hill House – was the Porcupine Inn. Now a private house - another stage coach inn with stabling for eighteen horses. Mentioned as early as 1675. It was eventually bought by a Mr. Komedera and his daughter planned it as a country club in 1977. an earlier owner, Mr. Montague, has exdtended it with a billard room, a gym and an indoor pool plus a lake in the grounds.
Porcupine – appears to be a modern house.

Singles Cross Lane
Hawfield Wood

Stubbs Hill
The name of the lane changes at the boundary to Perry’s Lane
Piece Wood

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material. In this area I would like to mention an excellent history of Knockholt by David Waldron Smithers.

The London/Kent boundary. Pratt's Bottom

A SQUARE BY SQUARE LOOK AT LONDON

TQ47 62 An area of scattered housing and woodland to the south of Pratt’s Bottom

Boundary London/Kent/Bromley
The boundary continues southwards through Pratt’s Grove parallel with a footpath and into Birthday Wood. At the edge of the wood the boundary continues slightly more south east.
The boundary runs west slightly to the north of but parallel to a path which forms the boundary of Rushmore Hill Nursery, it crosses another path, and then crosses Rushmore Hill. It then joins a path opposite and goes down the northern edge of Lower Randle’s Wood.

Post to the south Halstead
Post to the north Pratt's Bottom

On the London, Bromley side of the boundary
Budgin’s Hill
Fairtrough
Lattice Coppice
Upper Broom’s Wood

Hookwood Road
Hookwood Road is the original of the Rushmore Hill turnpike road.
Hookwood small children’s playground
Hook Wood
Beechcroft
Hookwood Cottages

Pratt’s Bottom Wood

Rushmore Hill
Built to replace Hookwood Road on the main turnpike road, probably to improve the gradient
The name is on the first edition of the Ordnance Survey and could mean a place, or a pool, where rushes grow, from Middle English.
Pratts Grove. Site of a lime kiln and pit operated by a Mr.Pratt. quarry site.
Birthday Wood. A Californian redwood was planted here to mark the birth of a child, hence the name,
Pratts Bottom Primary School built 1893

Compilation of this work has taken many years and numerous sources of material.