Tuesday, 30 August 2011

Tha -mes Tributary River Roding - Wanstead

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is met by a tributary to north and one from the west
Another tributary flows south


Post to the north Charlie Brown's
Post to the south Redbridge Station

Ashbourne Avenue
Nightingale Primary School. Mosaic mural of birds on the wall

Chigwell Road
Old Mill Court – the Old Mill was a pub dating to at least the mid-19th.
United Dairies building. Dairy Crest but now empty and derelict

Elmcroft Avenue
Wanstead Youth Centre

North Circular

Roding Lane South
Redbridge 275KV substation National Grid
Roding Spire Hospital BUPA
Hatton Special School
PDSA Pets Cemetery- including graves of animals awarded medals in wartime, etc.
Roding pumping station, 1904. Rectangular engine house with Lower boiler house in stock brick

Woodford Bridge Road
PDSA PetAid Hospital

Monday, 29 August 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Charlie Brown's

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south

TQ 41114 90415

Major road junction which intersects with the Roding and its linear park.


Post to the north Woodford Bridge
Post to the south Wanstead

Chigwell Road
Winn Bridge. This is where a stream – the Wynn Brook – joins the Roding. The bridge was passed to the Middlesex and Essex turnpike trust, and then the county in 1872
Parish water pump by the bridge, restored and repainted
Parish water pump eastern side of the road, restored and
Eastern sewage works. Built by the local board in 1882 and modernised to serves the greater part of Woodford in the 1950s. This area is now part of the park.
Chigwell Road Depot. This is now the Redbridge Reuse and Recycling Centre or Chigwell Reuse and Recycling Centre. It is managed by Shanks East London.
Roding Valley Park. Linear park along the river originally associated with the construction of the motorway
Allotments
Storm tanks owned by Thames Water

Maybank Road
Maybank Works – trading estate with many small works
The Bridge Church
The Bridge Community Centre
. Part of the Bridge Church and opened in 2004
Football and Cricket Store.

North Circular Road
North circular. On this stretch the road is still called Southend Road up to Charlie Brown’s Roundabout where it turns south as the North Circular Road and Southend Road continues eastwards. Above the roundabout it is on an elevated junction with the M11. A bridge on the current northbound north circular to the M11 slip-road marks the location of an un-built southern section of the M11.

M11
Junction 4 – Charlie Brown’s Roundabout. This is the start of the M11 at the north circular junction heading north in three lanes both ways. It is lit using high pressure sodium lighting replacing yellow low pressure sodium lighting. Originally the road was supposed to start at The Angel, Islington and junction numbers 1, 2 and 3 were kept for an inner London section. It was to connect here with a motorway to Essex and a motorway standard North Circular and it was built with spaces which would allow the road to merge. This section was built by W & C French Engineering,
Charlie Brown’s. in the 1890s Charlie Brown, a former boxer, took over the ownership of the Railway Tavern in Limehouse. Sailors brought mementoes from round the world and hang them on the wall of the pub. Charlie died in 1932 and his son Charlie ran the Blue Posts also in Limehouse but in 1938 he moved to Woodford, and opened The Roundabout pub here where the mementoes were displayed. The pub was demolished for road construction
Medieval watermill under the roundabout on the Roding.

Raven Road
Trading estate
Southend Road
Woodford trading Estate
The Orbital Centre
Unity Trading Estate


Sources
British History on line
London Borough of Redbridge, Web site
Pub History. Web site
SABRE Web site
Victoria County History. Essex

Thursday, 25 August 2011

Thames Tributary – River Roding - Woodford Bridge

Thames Tributary – River Roding
The Roding flows generally south


Post to the north Roding Valley
Post to the east Woodford Bridge
Post to the south Charlie Browns'



Chigwell Road
Broadmead Baptist Church. A Baptist mission was set up here in a sports pavilion in 1948 and a wooden church built in 1957. The current church has a polygonal roof and glazed lantern designed by Denis Hull, Sunday School Superintendent. The frontage has pink-painted, cast-concrete abstract reliefs done by Denis Hull in the 1960s and shows Biblical history from the Creation to the Second Coming. The curved concrete wall guides visitors towards the entrance. The church was opened in 1969 but badly flooded in 2000 and since restored.
Church hall at the back. Very plain

Finchingfield Road
Playing field

Ray Lodge Road
Ray Lodge was built in 1793 for George Wright son of the owner of. Ray House. The lodge has disappeared but the name of Ray Lodge is preserved here.
United Reform Church. A chapel was built in Globe Road 1865 by Congregationalists. After a new church was built in 1900 the chapel, which remained in use as a mission-room and was eventually bought by the New Apostolic church. The institute was built in 1920. It is now part of Ray Lodge United Reformed Church and also the Seventh Day Adventist church
Flats which are part of Ray Lodge Refurbishment Project with a ceramic mural on the end wall.

Snakes Lane East
Medieval road from Woodford Bridge into Chingford, was Sakes Lane, corrupted
Ray Park. This includes the James Leal Centre designed by Sarah Wigglesworth and providing facilities in the park. There is also a sports area and a children’s play area. The park was designed in the early 20th and includes cedar, sycamore, horse chestnut, lime and oak trees,
Artificial slate factory was set up in the grounds from 1770 -1811, by Sir James Wright who owned the estate. He used Italian techniques of manufacture from clay.
St Barnabas. Built in 1910-11 on land given by Lady Anne Charteris by Edwin T. Dunn in red brick, Laurence King added the fa├žade to what was an incomplete church in 1963-4. War Memorial.
Chigwell and Woodford Bridge Gas Co. opened 1863. Became the Chigwell Loughton and Woodford Company in 1873, and taken over by the Gas Light and Coke Company in 1912. I was all manually operated. He work closed in 1912 but a holder remains as does the perimeter brick wall.
Ray Lodge Primary Schools. Built in1904 by Woodford School Board. Ray Lodge Primary School, There is a mural on the building showing the solar system. The site include Ray Lodge children’s centre
Jubilee Parade
Railway tavern Football ground
Church Court on the site of Gothic Congregational Church dating from 1900.


http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2009/12/londonessex-border-woodford-bridge_03.html


Monday, 22 August 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Chigwell

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south west and south and is joined by a tributary from the west

TQ 42535 93002

Area of sports fields  and amenities alongside the Roding and the M11

Post to the north Buckhurst Hill
Post to the west Buckhurst Hill
Post to the east Chigwell
Post to the south Woodford Bridge


Lower Queens Road
Buckhurst Hill Community Primary School


Luxborough Lane
Site of Luxborough House. This mansion was at the end of the lane and was built for Robert Knight, Baron Luxborough and cashier for the South Sea Company. He fled abroad after the scandal but eventually got a peerage anyway. House demolished 1800
Luxborough Lane Lake. This was a gravel pit now flooded and used for carp fishing.
Old Loughtonians Hockey Club. The club is associated with Loughton School and the Old Loughtonians Trust. The original Loughton Hockey Club became the Old Loughtonians in 1920. They originally played at High Beech in the Speedway’s dirt-track and then to the London Playing fields at Fairlop and then to The Old Blues Rugby Football Ground. When the M11 was built they bought the Luxborough Lane site which opened with a new clubhouse in 1980.
Recycling Centre for Household Waste. Epping District Council
Spurs Lodge. Tottenham Hotspur Football Club Training Ground

M11
Bridge for Central Line between Chigwell and Roding Valley. Built 1972 with a 152ft span concrete bridge.

Railway – Central Line
From here on the line to Chigwell a double track curves east on a high embankment across the Roding Valley, and crosses the river on a three arch brick viaduct.

Sources
Epping Council. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Old Loughtonians,. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Web site
SABRE. Web site
Tottenham Football Club. Web site



Thames Tributary – tributaries to the River Roding = Chigwell

Thames Tributary – tributaries to the River Roding
The tributary flows south west and is joined by a tributary from the south

TQ 43620 92978

Area along Chigwell High Road with the station and shops surrounded by Essex style posh suburbia

Post to the west Chigwell
Post to the north Roding Lane
Post to the east Chigwell
Post to the south Chigwell

Chigwell High Road
Chigwell Hall. Built by Norman Shaw in 1876. It was commissioned by Alfred Savill and built by Norman Shaw. Alfred Savill who founded Savill’s Estate Agency. In 1905, it was bought by Walter Waugh and in 1938, by the Metropolitan Police. It is now used for events and weddings.
Metropolitan Police Sports Ground
Chigwell Station. Half a mile from the village centre with handsome staircases, ticket office and waiting rooms. It was opened in 1903 by the Great Eastern Railway on the Fairlop Loop. This became part of London Underground Central Line as part of the New Works Programme and electric Underground trains served the station from 1948
Siding on the east side was used to load fruit from local orchards. It had gone by the 1920s,
Orchard opened near the station by the Great Eastern Railway for fruit for its own hotels
Cottages built near the station by the Great Eastern Railway
William IV. Modern pub which has replaced an older one
Barstow Eve’s estate agents in the old building of William IV.

Hainault Road
Library

Sources
Day. London Underground
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Sunday, 21 August 2011

Thames Tributary – tributaries to the River Roding - Chigwell

Thames Tributary – tributaries to the River Roding
A tributary rises in this area and flows west and north. It is joined by another tributary from the east.

TQ 43052 92060

Suburban area to the south of Chigwell. Some institutions, golf and open space


Post to the west Woodford Bridge
Post to the north Chigwell
Post to the east Grange Hill
Post to the south Claybury


Chigwell High Road
Broomhill House and Broomhill Cottage. cottage, 18th House, divided into 2 cottages. Timber framed
Little West Hatch. Early 19th house in Stuccoed brick, Used by LCC from the 1930s in conjunction with Great West Hatch as accommodation for their patients. Closed 1966. Now a private house.
Chigwell Golf course. The course was built in 1924 and opened in 1925 by the Lord Lieutenant of Essex. The Club House is a 19th in brick with front covered in stucco which is marked look like stone blocks at the back is a part weather boarded, extension
Chigwell Lodge. 18th House in brick with a bell-turret
Flint Cottage. 19th House, of brick with panels of flint
Ten Mile Cottage. 18th house Timber framed and rendered
Cedar Lodge. Housing development which includes Great West Hatch House of 1800. This became Great West Hatch Hospital in the 1930s as a home for girls with learning difficulties, part of the Royal Eastern Counties Institution for Mental Defectives. Taken over by LCC in 1938. In 1948 under the NHS was part of the South Ockendon Institution for Mental Defectives. It was renamed West Hatch Hospital in 1988 and closed in 1992.

Turpins Lane
St.John’s Catholic Secondary School. The school originated in a boarding school run by the Sisters of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus & Mary in 1897 for delicate children. In 1972 it became a day school for children with learning difficulties

Sources
Chigwell Golf Club. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Lost Hospitals. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
St. John's School. Web site

Saturday, 20 August 2011

Thames Tributary – tributaries to River Roding - Chigwell

Thames Tributary – tributaries to River Roding
A tributary flows west and meets a tributary from the south which is made up of two other tributaries one of which rises in this area
.
TQ 44151 93881

The older part of Chigwell to the north of the modern shops. Many interesting buildings

Post to the west Chigwell
Post to the north Chigwell
Post to the east Chigwell Row
Post to the south Grange Hill

High Road
Christies. Two 18th houses Timber framed and plastered. At the back are two lead pumps in wooden cases from 18th with the tank fronts ornamented and embossed with initials and a date - M T 1762
Vine Cottage/ Christies Cottage. These are now renamed Dickens and Proctor’s Cottages. Two 18th houses Timber framed and weather boarded. One of them has the original wooden lead lined gutter.
Grange Court. 18th house in brick. Used as a school boarding house and recently as a ‘prep’ school’.
Hainault House, 19th Victorian Gothick house in yellow brick. This is said to have been built for John Knight, the Wapping soap manufacturer, and bought by Chigwell School in 1917
Underground passage – said to run from the school to the Kings Head
Harsnetts. House built 1600 timber framed, rendered with some weatherboarding. Bought for the school by Archbishop Harsnett in 1627 for the master of the English School, and named after him. Subsequently used as a boarding house for the school.
117 Bluebell ex-Haydens Indian Restaurant and Haydens Cottages. 18th house divided into three. Built of brick and with a shop front extended on front.
105 ex-Chigwell Village Stores/ Hilltop. 18th house divided into three. Timber framed, weather boarded, mock timber framing and roughcast render.
St.Mary. This is a typical rural Essex church approached by an avenue of yew trees. There wasa church here in 1160 built by Ralph Brittom in flint rubble and cement rendered. In 1475 a roof, weather boarded belfry with six bells, and leaded broach spire were added. The church was enlarged in 1886. Inside is a brass of exp-vicar Samuel Harsnett who became Archbishop of York and a bust and memorial to Shillibeer.
King’s Head, 17th timber weather boarded pub extended in 19th and 20th. Timber framed, partly weather boarded. Complex plan which has accrued over the years and including what were once probably separate buildings and also much ‘restoration’. ‘Extremely picturesque’. It appears in the first chapters of Dickens’ ‘Barnaby Rudge’ called 'The Maypole'. The Verderers' or Forest Courts of Epping Forest were held here until 1855. It now includes a Turkish restaurant, Sheesh, installed by Amstrad magnate, Alan Sugar. There is also an equestrian statue and ‘the biggest mirror in Essex’.
King's Head cottages, 18th house divided into two. Timber framed, weather boarded and plastered
50 Chigwell County Primary School
Radley's cottage, 18th house. Timber framed and weather boarded,
Saville Cottage. 17th house. Timber framed and weather boarded
Haylands. House dating from.1800.
125 Linden Cottage/ Dawkins. Two 18th cottages, Timber framed, part weather boarded, part mock timber framing with roughcast render. At one time they had been used as shops and the some of that premises remains.
Chingford Grammar school. Founded 1629 and dated on a crest above the porch - although it is said that Archbishop Harsnett bought the site in 1619 and that the school was in operation by 1623. It originally had a large schoolroom built of red brick and was extended in later centuries. The original blocks were the English School, Latin School, and the Latin Master's house. Supposed to have been the place where William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania, received his early education.
Church House. 17th house timber framed and rough-cast rendered, said to be the home of Chigwell doctors and bought by Chigwell School in 1876 for masters’ housing
National School Building. This originated in an 18th Charity School for girls called the Blue School in the 19th. It was joined by a charitable School of Industry for Girls in the early 19th. In 1836 a building was erected ion the Vicarage Field and opened as a National School in 1838. In 1902 it to Essex Education Committee, and the name changed to St. Mary's Girls and Infants Church of England School and in 1950 it was closed.
129-131 Coulson Almshouses run by Chigwell United Charities. 'Coulson's Almshouses 1557' appears on a plaque on the building put there when the current buildings were erected in 1858. Who Coulson was is not clear and they are managed by a body comprising a number of other local charities.
Brook House. 18th House, in stock brick,
Mineral spring said to have been discovered her in the 17th and called the ‘King’s Well’.

Vicarage Lane
Rose Bridge

Sources
Britsh History on Line. Chigwell.
Chigwell Grammar School. Web site
Chigwell United Charities. Web sitre
Essex County Council. Web site
Kings Head. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Friday, 19 August 2011

Thames Tributaries – tributaries to the river Roding - Grange Hill

Thames Tributaries – tributaries to the river Roding
Tributaries rise in this area and flow to the Roding – one flowing west and north and one flowing north west


Post to the west Chigwell
Post to the north Chigwell
Post to the east Hainault
Post to the south Hainault

Froghall Lane
Chigwell Cemetery. Local authority cemetery hidden up the lane.

Grange Hill
Part of the Forest bought in 1903 by London County Council, Essex County Council and local councils.
Grange Hill Estate; was built by the London County Council and lay in Essex until 1965 when it was transferred into London in Redbridge.

Hainault Road
Bald Hind Inn. This was an Edwardian building recently Demolished. This was here in 1770 and then called the 'Bald Faced Hind'. It is said that was opposite here that Daniel Day of Wapping held his work peoples’ beano with pork and beans every other year, alternately with the Maypole Inn. A boat - called the Mallot - was said to be brought from Wapping towed through the street by six horses. This fair was held until 1892,

Manor Road
Grange Hill Station. This lies between Hainault and Chigwell on the Central Line. It was opened by the Great Eastern Railway Company in 1903 between Woodford and Ilford. Its originally design was similar to Chigwell Station. In 1944 it was destroyed by a V1 rocket. In 1948 it became part of the London Underground Central Line and the buildings were replaced through the "New Works Programme”, suspended because of the Second World War. Thus it reopened as an electrified Central Line from in November 1948. This loop on the Central Line was run until the early 1990s separately using trains adapted for Automatic Train Operation and as a testing area for the use of such trains on other lines.
Goods yard – this was connected to the railway at the London end.
Houses built nearby for the station staff by the Great Eastern Railway in a Semi detached garden city style. The Station masters house is a detached villa with a pillared porch and large garden
St. Winifred. Built 1935 as a mission church

Railway Line
Summit of the line on the Fairlop Loop. Either side of the station are stretches of 1:100. When the line was built the clay was so unstable that old sleepers were burnt for days in an attempt to burn and settle it. The line leaves Chigwell in a cutting and a tunnel. The tunnel was difficult to build and now has retaining walls built by London Transport.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Chigwell Row

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises from two places in this area and flows westwards

TQ 45844 93105

Rural area and old village on the edge of the metropolitan area

Post to the west Chigwell
Post to the south Hainault

There were several medicinal springs in Chigwell Row

Chapel Lane
1-2 19th cottages Timber framed and weather boarded
Clare Hall. 18th house in stock brick. Henry Fletcher bought it in 1801, and changed its name to Chapel House.

Chase Lane
Chase Farm Cottage. 19th house Timber framed and weather boarded
Pump, 19th in a wooden case with a lead spout and a cast iron
handle.

Grove Lane
Millers Farm House. 17th Timber framed and weather boarded.
Grove Cottages Fish ponds

Lambourne Road
United Free Church, former congregational chapel of 1804. Originally part of the Essex Congregational Union. It is a rectangular building of Gault brick.
Beside it was an iron building used as a schoolroom. This was brought from Leytonstone in 1880.
The Grove House. This was the home of Shillibeer, who introduced omnibuses to London. Demolished 1964.

Pudding Lane
Chigwell Water works. The Chigwell Row Waterworks was part of the Essex Water Company opened 1967. Untreated water comes from Chingford Reservoirs and is treated with Chlorine and filtered. The water goes to parts of Ilford, Dagenham, Barking, Romford, Hornchurch and Tilbury.
Service reservoir from Chingford Mill

Shillibeer Walk
Named for George Shillibeer who lived locally.

Vicarage Lane
The Bowls
Reservoir
Forest House. Brick house built in 1800.
Forest House Dairy. Octagonal dairy from the 19th in brick. This has a pyramidal roof, which would once have been thatched. Inside is a glazed tile sunken floor of glazed tiles, a marble worktop and decorative glazed wall tiles.


Sources
British History On Line. Chigwell. Web site
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Chingford's Water
Pevsner and Cherry, Essex
United Free Church, Chigwell. Web site

Thursday, 18 August 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Buckhurst Hill

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south west and is met by the Loughton Brook from the north west

TQ 43842 93835

Post to the east Roding Lane
Post to the south Chigwell


Area of open space and playing fields on the edges of Loughton and Chigwell

Greenstead Road

White Bridge Junior School.

Roding Lane
David Lloyd, Chigwell Sports Centre
RAF Chigwell. This was in the area round the David Lloyd Centre. In 1943 it housed 3.600 and covered 70 acres hangers, billet huts, NAAFI, Post office, Chapel, etc. It was initially a centre for Second World War barrage balloons and later mobile air traffic control teams training for the D-Day landings and in the 1950s for the nuclear early warning system. It closed in 1958 and was used by the Air Training Corp. Eventually it was transferred to Chigwell Urban District Council. There remains some concrete roads, and a circular grassed area which was the balloon launch pad
Royal Observer Corps post – underground and now sealed and capped with concrete. It stands in a compound within an earlier compound. Inside was a battery, beds and furniture.
Manor House – the RAF station covered the site of Chigwell Hall Manor. However, a new manor house had been built some distance to the west during the 17th. It was a moated site, the moat surviving until infilled by the RAF
Guru Gobind Singh Khalsa College – independent secondary comprehensive school in the old High School buildings.
Buckhurst Hill County High School. The school was opened in 1938, and became comprehensive in the 1970s as Roding Valley High School. In 1989 it moved to a different site and the building was sold.
Buckhurst Hill Football Club. Founded in 1985 and funded the site and buildings which date from 2002.

Roding Valley Meadows
The nature reserve covers much of this area. Roding Meadows Nature Reserve is owned by Epping Forest District Council and the Grange Farm Centre Trust and managed by Essex Wildlife Trust.
Lake was dug to provide gravel for the M11.

Sources
Buckhurst Hill Football Club
Fighter Control. Web site
Guru Gobind Singh Khalsa College. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Victoria County History. Essex

Wednesday, 17 August 2011

Thames Tributary – River Roding - Roding Lane

Thames Tributary – River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south west and is met by a tributary from the south east


Post to the north Oakwood Hill
Post to the west Buckhurst Hill
Post to the east Barringtons
Post to the south Chigwell Station



Grange Farm
North western area of the land once covered by the Grange Farm Centre, which was a holiday and camping centre opened in 1951. It closed in the 1980s and is now redeveloped for housing, plus a pavilion and nature site, with community use of some space
Grange Farm Riding Centre. Thus was set up in 1958 by Mrs. Norah Jacques and called 'Pony Riding for Paralysis' and 'Chigwell Riding Trust For Special Needs' in 2000, inspired by a paralysed Scandinavian Olympic dressage champion. Mrs. Jacques was helped by Gerard van der Gucht of Forest Lodge Riding School who lent ponies. Patients came from St. Margaret's Hospital, Epping and later St. Thomas's Hospital and special schools. The Trust was funded to set up the site in Chigwell by the London Parochial Charities and it was opened in 1964; with new stables in 2000.

M11

Playing fields. This is also part of the Roding Meadows Nature Reserve

Roding Lane
Wakes Hall. 1938 house in ‘Tudor’ style.
Bramstons
Site of Manor House. The manor moved here in the 17th from nearer to the Roding and a newer Manor now exists to the south.
Chigwell Cricket Club. The club claims to date from 1988 playing at Ray Park in Woodford, and to have been called 'Aural Sculpture', later Garden Cricket Club. In 1998 they became Chigwell Cricket Club playing at the Old Chigwellians ground.
Roding Lane Gas Distribution centre
The Old Chigwellians Club. A sports and social club for old boys from the school.
M11 Chigwell Logistics Centre. Since 2009 the southbound side of the site has been used as a logistics centre for vehicles destined for the Olympic Park construction site. This area was originally planned as a motorway service area on the M11 but the motorway has never been built to its planned length and the plans were not popular at a 1971 public inquiry. The site was later used as a police control depot with an emergency turn-around area and a bridge was built but no connections to the local road network.

Thames Tributary Roding - Oakwood Hill

Thames Tributary Roding
The Roding flows south westwards


Post to the east Debden
Post to the south Roding Lane


Alderton Hall Lane
Alderton Infant School, opened in 1952

M11

Oakwood Hill
Oakwood Hill Estate. Local authority housing from the 1960s.
Recreation Ground and Roding Walk
Wooded roadside site
Roding Meadows Nature Reserve. It is owned by Epping Forest District Council and the Grange Farm Centre Trust and managed by Essex Wildlife Trust. It consists of unimproved hay meadows, hedgerows, with scrub, secondary woodland and planted tree. It follows the Roding over some of the open space in this area. The meadows are cut for hay in summer, followed by grazing by rare breed Long Horn cows. Ten miles of hedgerow is laid and coppiced. After heavy rain the area is prone to flooding. Four fields are designated a site of special scientific interest

Tuesday, 16 August 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Debden

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows westwards and is joined by a tributary from the south

TQ 44084 96172

The bridge between down market Debden and Essexey posh Chigwell


Post to the north Debden
Post to the west Loughton
Post to the south Chigwell
Post to the east Abridge Road

Chigwell Lane
Loughton Bridge. This is an ancient crossing although the earliest reference is in the 13th. In the 17th it became a county bridge but the area is subject to flooding and in 1809 it was destroyed by floods and rebuilt in timber by Johnson as County Surveyor but this lasted until only 1824. The next rebuilding provided tunnels under the causeway to channel flood water and there are more recent flood relief schemes here.
Mill - There was possibly a mill and mill dam here.

M11
Junction 5. This has no northbound Mway access

Sources
British History. Online. Essex
SABRE. Web site
Victoria County History of Essex

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Chigwell

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows from a source in Rolls Park, northwards.

TQ 44494 94890

The north part of Chigwell as the main road turns towards Abridge. Old houses and some Essexy countryside


Site to the west Roding Lane
Post to the north Debden Estate
Post to the south Chigwell

Abridge Road
Site of Barringtons. This was a manor also known as Little Chigwell but named from the Barrington family which held it from the 12th but in other ownership from the 17th – including the Harvey family, and Sir Elias Harvey, the commander of Teremaire at Trafalgar. The house, Rolls House, was demolished in the 1950s following damage during the war from bombing and from occupation by the army. It was a timber framed and brick 17th building
Wall which is listed. It is 17th in red brick with stone coping. This was the boundary wall to the park

Chigwell High Road
25 Rolls Park Farm
The Orangery. The orangery to Rolls House survived but has been rebuilt.
Stables. Remain from Rolls Park. Converted to housing.
The Old Cottage. Remains from Rolls Park.
Haylands. Brick and stucco house from 1800. Has been used as boarding accommodation for Chigwell School.
Sandon Lodge. Has been used as boarding accommodation for Chigwell School
Tailours. 18th house in dark red brick. At the entrance is a wrought iron gateway, with 18th railings and walls

Chigwell Lane
Home Farm

Grange Farm Lane
Grange Farm Trust Centre. This was a holiday and camping centre with a swimming pool. It was opened in 1951 by the Princess Elizabeth and featured in the Festival of Britain. It closed in the 1980s and is now redeveloped for housing, plus a pavilion and nature site, with community use of some space.

Green Lane
Fives and Heronians Cricket Club. The club dates from the 1970s.
Old Farm. Caravan and camp site.

Sources
British History online. Chigwell
Chigwell School. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Fives and Heronians. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Monday, 15 August 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Abridge

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows south west


Countyside area north of Chigwell and east of Loughton. Crossed by the M11 and the Roding. Various country houses here have had various uses

Post to the west Loughton Bridge
Post to the north Abridge Road
Post to the east Marchings

Abridge Road
Woolston Hall. 16th altered in 18th. Timber framed and plastered. Surrounded by 18th red brick wall with gateposts, etc. The estate was owned by William I and then by the Scott family from 1485. From 1939 it was run as a sports club by the Co-operative Wholesale Society and in the 1970s it was used for as ‘The Country Club’ night club - a private members opened by film star Sean Connery and footballer Bobby Moore. It was later bought up by an local entrepreneur and became a raucous night club. Extensions and other entertainment buildings were added, which were very noisy. In 2008 the listed building was gutted by fire.
Woolston Hall Golf Club. This was built on the site after the night clubs had been pulled down. A swimming pool remains from the clubs and is part of a fitness centre.

Gravel Lane
Tournours Hall. 17th house on a medieval site, altered in the mid 19th. It was the home 1860 - 1914 of Ada Palmer, sculptor and painter, with a studio in an adjacent barn. Inside the house are some of her works and in the chapel is a memorial to her.

Sources
Cherry and Pevsner. Essex
London Transport. Country Walks

Thames Tributary River Roding - Abridge

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows west and south and is joined by a tributary from the north west and another from the south east.


Post to the west Debden
Post to the east Abridge
Post to the south Woolston Hall



Abridge Road

Broadfield Shaw

Gravel Lane

London Road

M11

Sunday, 14 August 2011

Thames Tributary –tributary to the River Roding - Marchings

Thames Tributary –tributary to the River Roding
The tributary picks up tributaries from the east and flows north west


Post to the north Abridge
Post to the west Woolston Hall
Post to the east Lambourne End
post to the south Lambourne End


Clarks Wood

Gravel Lane
Marchings. This was once Martin’s Farm and is a 16th timber framed building. In the early 19th this was the premises of a John Arnold, a watch maker. From 1800 until 1843 a watch-making business was carried on at Marchings in Gravel Lane by John Roger Arnold of Dent and Arnold, Strand. In 1821 he patented improvements in chronometers. His workshops are said to be at the rear of a building.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Lambourne End

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows westwards


Post to the north Marchings
Post to the east Lambourne End

Gravel Lane
Taylors Farm, this was once known as Coles Farm and is known to be pre-15th
Brownings Farm, the farm was there in 1486. This is a medieval building, timber framed and plastered, but with many alterations.
Manor House. Barn 17th timber framed and weather boarded. The manor of Stocktons was in this area in the 15th

Millers Lane
Billingsbourne Farm. Known to be pre-15th.
Willow Park Farm

Friday, 12 August 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Lambourne End

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows westwards


Post to the west Lambourne End
Post to the north Lambourne
Post to the east Lambourne End
Post to the south Hainault Forest

Manor Road
The Camelot. This was once called The Beehive and a plaque with that name on it is still on the Hoe Lane side of the building.
The Iron Pound was opposite the pub and used for stray horses and cattle
Harmes Farm. 17th timber framed b
uilding
Berkeley Farm Project. Charitable p
roject running a garden centre

Wednesday, 10 August 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Debden Estate

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
Two tributaries meet here and flow south east – one from the north and one from the west
.

TQ 4466596311

Interesting industrial area alongside the M11 plus part of the Debden Estate

Post to the north Debden
Post to the east Abridge Road
Post to the south Loughton Bridge

Langston Road
Sports field
Industrial estate
Bank of England Printing Works 1950s. The works is now operated by De La Rue, specialised London based printers. Bank notes had been printed in Old Street since 1916 and in 1956 moved here. The factory was designed by Easton & Robertson and built by Sir Robert McAlpine & Sons Ltd.
Aerzen House. Headquarters of machine company.
The Crystal Building. Headquarters of Clinton Cards

Station Approach
Debden Station. The station was originally opened in 1865 and now stands between Loughton and Theydon Bois on the Central Line. It began as a one platform halt and passing place by the Eastern Counties Railway as part of their extension to Ongar. It was originally called Chigwell Road, and renamed the same year as Chigwell Lane. The original stationmaster’s house survives. The station was closed in 1916 until 1919 and became part of the London & North Eastern Railway in 1923. As part of 1930s "New Works Programme" it was to become part of the Central Line owned by London Transport although was still lit with oil lamps in 1940. Upgrading work was completed by in 1948, services being replaced with electric in 1949. British Railways then operating the goods services until 1964 and there were two sidings. As a Central Line station it was renamed Debden after the nearby estate and it was designed as a potential terminal and a special siding to allow trains to be turned back is still in use. In 1974 the station was again reconfigured with part Government funding with a new ticket hall, canopies and lighting.

The Broadway
The Winston Churchill

Westhall Road
Clydesdale pub

Sources
Day. London Underground
London Railway Record
Victoria County History. Essex

Sunday, 7 August 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Debden Estate

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The Tributary rises in this area and flows south eastwards

TQ 44210 97175

Debden Estate - this was originally London County Council 'overspill'.

Post to the south Debden
Post to the west Loughton

Burney Drive
St John Fisher Catholic Primary School

Colebrook Lane
Open space

Jessel Drive
The Cottage Loaf pub

Mannock Drive
Trinity Church. Joint Anglican and Methodist church

Willingale Road
The Hereward Primary School. This opened in 1953 as two separate schools either side if Colebrook Lane. They merged in 1981,
Debden Park High School
St Thomas More Catholic Church. Opened 1953

Sources
Hereward Primary School. Web site
St. Thomas More.  Web site

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Debden

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The Tributary rises in this area and flows south eastwards

TQ 43941 97522

Suburban area on the edge of Epping Forest and local authority built Debden

Post to the west Debden


Burney Drive
The stream flows alongside the road in a wide grassy verge

Chester Road
Gunmakers Arms. Large modern pub

Church Hill
Flats on the site of Loughton bus garage. This garage replaced the one across the road in 1953 and was closed itself in 1986. .
Homebase. This building is effectively the 1923 Loughton Bus Garage which was replaced in 1953 and became the Co-op bakery.
Plume of Feathers Pub. This pub dates from the 1820s and has a more modern front extension hiding the original building.

Clays Lane
The road is named after a Mr. Clay
Goldings. Blue plaque to Everard Calthrop 1857 – 1927, Engineer and pioneer of the parachute
Loughton golf club – 9 hole course

Englands Lane
The area was developed in the 1920s by George England. It was once called Ree Lane after the stream and there was a ford at the Clay Lane junction.
Ree House stood in the area and had at one time been a chapel. Demolished 1906.
Goldings Hill Evangelical Church

Goldings Hill
The road was built in the early 17th to link Loughton to Epping and was built on a causeway

Grosvenor Drive
Epping Forest Community Church. Evangelical, charismatic – established 1982.

Lower Road
Blue plaque to W.W.Jacobs on a gatepost

Pyrles Lane
Hillyfields Open Space

Rectory Lane
Rectory Green Open Space. This was also Parson’s Green and the Rectory stood nearby

Sources
Blue Plaque guide
Epping Forest Community Church. Web site
Glazier. London Bus Garages
Gunmakers Arms. Web site
Plume of Feathers. Web site
Victoria County History of Essex

Saturday, 6 August 2011

Thames Tributary – River Roding - Abridge

Thames Tributary – River Roding
The Roding flows westwards


Village north of Chigwell and east of Loughton with a major crossing of the Roding.   This is the village centre with pubs, a few shops, churches and houses

Post to the west London Road
Post to the south Marchings
Post to the north Theydon Hall
Post to the east Lambourne

Abridge Road
Roding Bridge. 19th red brick bridge with limestone keystones. This is an important bridge said to have once been Aeffa's Bridge from which Abridge is named. It became a county bridge after 1594 and rebuilt in 1707. However by the mid 19th flooding was a problem and plans were drawn up for an embankment and culverts paid for jointly by the parish and the county. The present bridge is the result of this.

Chapel Chase
Evangelical Free Church. The church started in 1923 and this building was set up in 1924. It is wood with a cement-rendered front

Hoe Lane
36 Lambourne Primary School. This was built in 1842 for children who lived in Abridge. To start with only half it was built and the rest added in 1879. The school bell is said to have come from an old locomotive and was rung to start the school day until 1946, and since then has been on display. A bell is still rung every morning.
Abridge Cricket Club. John Lockwood Ground and pavilion. The club traces itself back to 1838.

London Road
2 The Maltster's Arms Public House. The site now includes two adjoining cottages. It is 18th timber framed and weather boarded plus a rear extension and bake house.
Chapel. This is a plain brick building opened by the Wesleyans in 1833 when Abridge was known as ‘Little Sodom’. In 1844 it was taken over by Congregationalists. In 1877 new classrooms were added but it ceased having a religious use in 1905 and was used as a parish room. It is now housing.
Abridge Park Homes - Caravan Park
Great Downs Farm. Two barns – one, the smaller, is 18th timber framed and weather boarded. The other is 17th timber framed and partly weather boarded
Gould's Cottages. A terrace of 5 brick houses from about 1840.
47 The Log Cabin. Complete with totem pole, wooden Indian and lake, all built by Ron.
The Roding Herd of Pedigree Simmentals. This was established in 1982 with three foundation cows, from Swiss and German bloodlines.
91 Abridge Autos was Abridge Fast Fit Garage but now it has been taken over by Sean (and Robbie and Dan)

Market Place
Roding Restaurant. Three buildings of different periods put together as a restaurant. Timber framed and plastered, one is a 15th house jettied at the front, with shop windows below. Another is 17th also with shop windows and then a 19th building.
House, next to Roding Restaurant 18th timber framed, plastered with weather boarded dado,
House, previously a shop by the bridge. 16th
Blue Boar. Early 19th public house with painted brick symmetrical front. The Blue Boar is a badge of the house of Lancaster. The site includes 19th brewery structures and a malt house from the Anchor Brewery. The pub was a stop for coaches, and later buses.
Abridge Brewery. This had been the Anchor Brewery and lastly a store for Whitbreads
K6 telephone box in the pub car park
Retreat House. Once used as a post office. 18th with a symmetrical weather-boarded front
House adjacent to the ex-post office. 16th building
Two shops and a house in a 14th Hall house. Timber framed, plaster and painted brick,

Pancroft Estate,
Prefabricated houses and fifty post-war council houses.

Ongar Road
1 Roding Hall. This was the White Hart pub rebuilt on its ancient site in the late 19th
Holy Trinity. This was built in 1836 as a chapel of ease to St Mary & All Saints Lambourne. It is a plain building in brick with a front added in 1877. Currently closed because of dry rot
River Cottage. 18th house timber framed, weather boarded, and roughcast. Door surround carved with fruit, leaves and children's heads
The Sycamores. An old house whose features have been removed in rebuilding.

The Chase
Maryon Terrace. Eight red brick cottages dated 1841

The Poplars
The Poplars was a big 19th house. It was demolished and replaced with council housing in the mid 1960s.

White Hall
White Hall, This dates from 1729. It has a plastered Georgian front with a parapet.

Sources
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Victoria History of Essex

Thursday, 4 August 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Abridge Road

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows westwards and is joined by tributaries from the north and south


Rural area with scattered farms and crossed by the M11.  Abridge Road heads south towards the crossing of the Roding at Abridge


Post to the north Theydon Bois
Post to the west Ongar Road
Post to the south Abridge
Post to the east Abridge


Abridge Road
Theydon Hall, late Georgian yellow brick. It is on the site of the ancient manor house but was not the manor house from the 17th
Original church was nearby. Demolished in 1843
Theydon Hall Farm Piggott’s Farm. Farmhouse from the 17th timber framed and plastered. 18th barn
Mossford Green Nursery and camp site

Epping Lane
Bloody Mead. Local stories that this is the site of a Roman battle

M11

Sources
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Victoria County History. Essex

Wednesday, 3 August 2011

Thames tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Lambourne

Thames tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows northwards to the Roding


Post to the west Abridge
Post to the north Ongar Road
Post to the east Church Lane
Post to the south Lambourne End

Ape’s Grove.
Wood surrounded by an ancient hedge bank. It comprises hornbeam coppice, with occasional oak and ash. There are a number of old including hornbeam and ash coppice stools. There is a large wild service tree and an old field maple pollard.

Church Lane
St.Mary and All Saints. Pevsner describes this is 'a church of quite exceptional charm and historical range’. It is a 12th church re-modelled
in the 18th, built of flint rubble and cement rendered plus a weather boarded bell turret, Inside are 15th wall painting one of St. Christopher and there are also brasses and monuments.,
Lambourne Hall. Manor house from the 16th timber framed and plastered. In one room is a mantelpiece and panels from Marks Hall, Coggeshall. A stone fire place from here is in the Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight.
Tithe Barn House. 16th barn converted to a house in 1983. It is timber framed and weather boarded.
Soapley House

Jubilee Plantation
The wood is believed to dare from 1935 to mark and planted for George V's Silver Jubilee. The oldest trees are on the eastern side and consists of oak, ash and sweet cChestnut.

New Farm Drive
New Farm

Soapleys Wood.
Pollarded trees on the boundary

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Lambourne End

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows northwards to the Roding


Post to the west Marchings
Post to the north Lambourne
Post to the east Lambourne
Post to the south Lambourne End

Hoe Lane
St John’s Farm

Knolls Wood

New Road
Bishops Hall. This is an old manor once held by the Bishop of Norwich and subsequently after the 16th, the Hale family and by the 19th was part of the Lockwood family estate. The original manor house is a moated site to the east. A new hall was built in the 17th by members of the Walker family. This became the home of the Lockwoods but it was demolished in 1936. Another new house was built nearby incorporating some features of the earlier house
Moat
Liversedge and Atkinson Engineers
Lambourne Parish Room
Poultry Farm
Deux Hall. Also known as Dews Hall and an old manor for the area. Named for Deu or Dew family who held land here in 13th. In the 18th it was purchased by the Lockwood family who lived there. In 1735 the house was 'an old brick building’ and this was enlarged in the classical style. It was demolished before 1841 and is now the red-brick stable court of Bishops Hall

Sources
Osborne. Defending London

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Theydon Bois

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River The tributary rises in this area and flows southeastwards

Post to the north Blunt's Farm
Post to the east Hobbs Cross Road
Post to the south Abridge Road

Abridge Road
Thrifts Hall Farm
Theydon Bois Cemetery



Coopersale Lane
Springhouse and Marcris House Nursing Home
Motorway compound


Epping Lane
Hydes Farmhouse. 16th timber framed with 20th pargetted plaster cladding. 17th barn, timber framed and weather boarded.

M11

Roman Road
Line of Roman road in footpaths

Tuesday, 2 August 2011

Thames Tributary – River Roding - Abridge

Thames Tributary – River Roding
The Roding flows westwards and is joined by a tributary from the north


Countryside area around Ongar Road heading east out of Abridge.  Some houses along the road and infrastructure works on the north bank of the Roding


Post to the west Abridge Road
Post to the north Hobbs Cross Road
Post to the east Ongar Road
Post to the south Lambourne

Epping Lane
Hills Farm
Theydon Bois Sewage Works

Jacksons Farm

Ongar Road
Oak Farm
Black boarded cottages 18th timber framed, weather boarded and plastered
Abridge Village Hall
Roding House or Coach House. Medieval hall house, timber framed and rendered with some weatherboarding.
Hillman's Cottages, six pairs built 1935 for employees at Stapleford Aerodrome
Grove Cottage, 2 cottages 19th timber framed, roughcast and rendered with weather boarding

Sources
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Victoria History of Essex.

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Hobbs Cross Road

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows south

Post to the north Hobb Cross Farm
Post to the west Theydon Bois
Post to the south Ongar Road
Post to the east Abridge Golf Course

Hobbs Cross Road

Epping Lane
Brook House

Thames Tributary = tributary to the River Roding - Hobbs Cross

Thames Tributary = tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows southwards and is met by another tributary from the west.


Post to the west Blunt's Farm
Post to the north Hobbs Cross
Post to the east Hill Hall
Post to the south Hobbs Cross Road


Coopersale Road
The Priory. 17th House which was once the Rectory. It is timber framed faced with red brick. Barn. 16th Timber framed and weather boarded

Church Lane
All Saints Church. Dates from 13th and is said to be sited here because of an adjacent road to London. It is also thought that Queen Elizabeth visited the church while staying at Garnish Hall in 1572. 13th with later additions built of flint rubble. The tower is Tudor. On the wall outside is a panel to "Syr John Crosbe Knyghyt late alderman and grosar of London’ and there is also a scratch dial and above it a Sundial. Inside are bequest boards and hatchments as well as many interesting tombs and memorials. An oak door used as a bookcase came from a medieval priest’s house which was in the churchyard, until 1924.

Hobbs Cross Road
Hobbs Cross Farm. The farm was a mid 19th replacement by Sir William Bowyer-Smijth to replace one which had been demolished. It was run recently as an ‘open farm’ and a tourist attraction. Now Equestrian Centre and Business centre
Cottages. These were the Fitzwilliam Almshouses. Endowed in 1602 by Anne Sidney, Lady Fitzwilliam of Gaynes Park. These were built for four poor widows, money was invested and the almshouses continued. By 1895 they were very dilapidated and in 1923 they were sold. They are four small red brick cottages with brass plates on the doors.

M25

Private Road
Route of Roman Road
Barbers Wood

Monday, 1 August 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Blunts Farm

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary flows eastwards

TQ 46390 99114

Country side area in Essex. The M11 goes north through this area and in the north east is part of the junction with the M25.

Post to the west Theydon Bois
Post to the north Coopersale Hall
Post to the east Hobbs Cross Farm
Post to the south Theydon Bois

M11

Coopersale Lane
Blunts Farm. In process of being turned into a golf course/landfill site.
Blunts Farm Wood. A small ancient wood, with hornbeam, oak and ash
Brownfield. This area is hummocky ground to the north of the stream. South of the stream an area has been destroyed.

Church Lane
Garnish Hall. 17th house or earlier with red brick and timber framing. Moat. This is the old manor house for the area.

Sources
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding - Theydon Bois

Thames Tributary – tributary to the River Roding
The tributary rises in three places in this area and flows eastwards


Post to the north Great Gregories
Post to the east M11 junction

Coppice Row
Theydon Green
St Mary’s church hall. This is an old army hut put on part of the glebe after the Second World War
Theydon Bois Village Hall. A new hall completed in 2001. It replaces an earlier Hall built in 1966 which was on the site of the car park itself the site of the Glebe Field.

Forest Drive
Old Foresters Sports Ground

Loughton Lane
'Avenue of Trees'. These oak trees were planted in the 1830s apparently for Queen Victoria’s accession to the throne. A new line of trees was planted in 2010, set back from the current row in order to replace some which needed to be felled.

Mead Barn
2 Queen Victoria. McMullans Pub. 16th building timber framed and plastered

Orchard Drive
5 Baldocks. 17th timber framed house with a red brick front
Theydon Bois Primary School

Slade End
1 The Bull Public House. 17th timber framed and rendered building. Painted plaster relief of a bull and a long painted sign board.

Station Approach
Carriages – this was a pub called the Railway Arms
Theydon Bois Station. Between Debden and Epping on the Central Line. Opened by the Great Eastern Railway as ‘Theydon’ in 1865. Name changed to ‘Theydon Bois’ in December of the same year. In 1949 it was opened as part of the electrified Central Line