Wednesday, 22 December 2010

Thames Tributary Bonesgate Stream - Chessington

Thames Tributary Bonesgate Stream
The Bonesgate continues to flow north east towards the Hogsmill

TQ 18198 63466

Suburban area of largely local authority housing around an older village area. Some nice open space


Post to the east Bonesgate
Post to the west Chessington
Post to the south Horton
Post to the north Chessington North and Hoo

 Bonesgate Open Space

This is on the east bank of the stream and is a Local Nature Reserve. The banks on both sides have oak woodland with hazel and blackthorn scrub overshadowing the stream

Chessington
Chessington is listed In the Domesday Book and is thought to mean – ‘the hill of a man named Cessa’. It remained a village until after the First World War.

Church Lane
Church Fields Recreation ground
Gosbury Hall at the junction with Stokesby Road.
Copt Gilders Hall this was a farm at the junction with Stokesby Road.
St.Mary’s Community Hall
British Legion Club

Garrison Lane
St Mary the Virgin. The old village church in the middle of a 20th housing estate, it originally stood by a field path and it is on raised ground. It is listed in Merton Priory records from 1174 and has a 12th century timber nave. It is built in flint, with a straight bell-turret with shingled broach-spire restored by Hesketh in, 1854. There is stained glass in the aisle window by Morris & Co., 1918. On the Kingston Zodiac it is part of the Lion's penis – there are lions' heads in the west window. Tablet to Dr Crisp with an inscription by Fanny Burney's father. In the chancel is a 15th Nottingham alabaster sculpture of the Annunciation, discovered during a restoration.

Green Lane
On the Kingston Zodiac the land represents part of the Lion's hind leg

Reynolds Avenue
Chessington Hall. The road covers the area of the old hall. The hall; was built in the early 16th. Fanny Burney stayed there and ‘Cecilia’ her second novel, was partly written here in 1782. It was the home of, Dr Samuel Crisp, when 'no road, not even a sheep walk, connected his lonely dwelling with the abodes of men. It was rebuilt in 1832 and demolished in 1965.  Council housing was built in the grounds in the 1950s.

Sources
Kingston Zodiac
Pevsner and Cherry. South London
St.Mary the Virgin. Web site

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