Thursday, 17 September 2009

The London/Surrey boundary - Castle Hill

The London/Surrey/Kingston boundary continues up the Bonesgate Stream as far as Moor Lane and then turns east along Chessington Road it turns south to pass the western end of Kevin Grove and goes south west to skirt the northern boundary of Butcher’s Grove and then the eastern edge of Castle Hill it then goes south down a path.

The Bonesgate stream continues to flow north east towards the Hogsmill, and for some of the way provides the border marker.
TQ 19187 63996

Residential area with much local authority housing, open space and pleasant riverside areas

Post to the north Bonesgate
Post to the west Chessington
Post to the east West Ewell
Post to the south Horton


Sites on the Surrey, Epsom side of the boundary

Butcher’s Grove
Small wood near a golf course
Horton Light Railway came through this section and paths are laid on its embankments. The track divided in the wood and one section ran back to Long Grove Hospital.

Great Wood. Coppiced ancient woodland.
Cutting for the Horton Light Railway

Sites on the London, Kingston side of the boundary

Castle Hill
Woodland near the site of a former medieval hunting lodge called Brettgrave. The area was owned by the Abbot of Chertsey and Brettgrave is the original Manor for the parish of Epsom owned by the Horton family, The family name of Horton is derived from old English where "hor" means muddy and ''ton" means town.' And here the clay soils quickly become sticky in wet weather. The Manor of Brettgrave was out of use by the 14th . Medieval earthwork with associated pond. Possible 11th mill.
Platform which may represent a defensive position from the 11th

Moor Lane
The road name changes to ‘Chessington Road” at the boundary
Bonesgate - pub alongside the river. It is said it was originally called ‘The Gate’ and that the name reflects the name of a past landlord, Mr. Borne.
Moor Lane Conservation Area. On the west bank of the Bonesgate are old allotments unused since the 1980’s and there are fallen oak trees

Sources
British History Online. Web site
Borough of Epsom and Ewell. Web site
London Borough of Kingston. Web site
London Railway Record
Osborne. Defending London

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