Friday, 12 August 2016

Riverside -- south bank west of the Tower. Chertsey Abbey Chase

Riverside -- south bank west of the Tower. Chertsey Abbey Chase

This post covers sites to the south of the river only.  North of the river is Laleham Littleton Lane Quarry

Post to the south Chertsey Bridge and Chertsey Bridge North
Post to the west Chertsey Abbey
Post to the north Laleham

Bridge Road
Abbey Chase. This is now a Care Home.  The house was built in the 1920s on the site of the Miller’s House at Abbey Mills. It was a five-bedroom bungalow owned by Col. Claire and called Benham Park.  It was bought by the care home owners in 1989. The stables were sold off for housing and the main building had a new floor added to become a nursing home.


Abbey Stream
This is a backwater of the Thames. It enters the Thames north of Chertsey Bridge having flowed down from its entrance at Penton Hook. It was cut for medieval Chertsey Abbey to power a mill near the Abbey. It was thus also known as Oxley, Oxlake or Oaklake Mill River.  The mill itself survived the dissolution and in 1809 it was considered as the main Thames navigation channel as part of a flood prevention programme.  Chertsey Weir was built instead.
Abbey Mills. Bridge and remains of what was part of a water mill owned by medieval Chertsey Abbey. It is a bridge with three arches which may have been widened at some time since. Some masonry was added by the 20th landscape architect, Percy Cane.  Water is discharged under the bridge into the lower millpond and overflow from the upper pool discharges through a channel in the north bank.   This mill is shown on a map of 1735 which also indicates that it was present in the 16th when the Abbey was dissolved. It is also shown in 19th photographs. It was latterly a flour mill.


Burway Ditch
This runs parallel to the Abbey River and is also part of water management measures undertaken by Chertsey Abbey in the early medieval period or earlier.


M3 Motorway
Bridge over the Thames. The bridge is 3 upstream of Chertsey lock and bridge. Built in the early 1970s, it was first used in 1974, when the Sunbury - Bracknell section of the motorway opened.


Sources
Abbey Chase. Web site
British Listed Buildings. Web site
SABRE. Web site
Surrey Archaeological collections. Web site
Wikipedia. Web site. As appropriate

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