Wednesday, 18 December 2013

River Pinn Park Wood

River Pinn
The Pinn flows south westwards

Post to the east Eastcote

Broadwood Avenue

Developed in the 1930s on King College Estate land.

Celandine Route

A walking route along the River Pinn

Kings College Road

Named for the College which were major landowners here since the 15th and who are still the Lords of the Manor.

Park Avenue

Ruislip-Northwood War Memorial Homes. Opened in 1952 for disabled service men. Also called the Haig Homes.

97 Modern Movement house. White concrete. By the pioneer modernists Connell, Ward & Lucas, 1936. Restored.

99 is the least altered. It is by Connell, Ward & Lucas, in White stucco with flat roofs.

101 Modern Movement House.

Park Woods

This is hornbeam and oak woodland and a Site of Special Scientific Interest which also screens Ruislip Lido. There is a strip of younger woodland where pylons once stood and in the south a stand of aspen and wild cherries. It was earlier known as Ruislip Park – that is a park in the medieval sense from the 13th century.  The original enclosure was oval and in the southern part of the present wood. Earth banks enclosed it and they run from near the entrance from Broadwood Avenue eastwards to the footpath near Grangewood School in Fore Street. This land belonged to Kings College and began to be taken for building in the 1920s. Following public concern in 1930 the College agreed to make Park Wood public open space. This was agreed and part funded by Middlesex County Council and Ruislip-Northwood Urban District Council agreed to maintain it.  It was declared open in 1932.

Sources

Bowlt. Ruislip Past

Citywildspace,

Highways and Byways around historic Ruislip, Northwood and Eastcote

Walford.  Village London

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