Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Riverside west of the Tower, north bank Remenham Park


This posting covers sites north of the river only. South of the river is Old Windsor Saxon town


Post to the north Nickcroft Ait and Ham Island
Post to the south Old Windsor Beaumont and Wraysbury riverside



Kingswood Creek
Posh private estate around an inlet from the Thames

Old Ferry Drive
This originally accessed the Old Windsor Ferry, now defunct.  It is now a posh private road with no access to plebs.
Old Ferry House. This is said to have been part of the farm estate. It is a 19th house fronting onto the Thames
Old Coach House. This is a 19th and older house. It was originally a service building for the Old Ferry House, for a coachman who also looked after the pigs. It was latterly used as a boathouse and a business as such.  It has a slipway.
King Johns Hunting lodge. This was once known as Place Farmhouse. Late 15th or early 16th house. In 1369 the manor-house of Wraysbury, an old hall and land were leased to John Jourdelay and Thomas Remenham.   In 1543 it was leased to Sir Walter Stonor who is said to have built the house    on the site of what was believed to be a Hunting Lodge of King John.  It later became a farmhouse. The house was ‘restored’ in 1930 and in 1978.  It is a timber framed house with an old aisled hall which is open to the roof and two arcade posts, but its date is unclear. There are 16th fireplaces with centred stone arches and foliage carving. Apparently a miniature steam railway runs round the perimeter of the grounds – the railway itself was shipped here from Disney in the US.
28 Wraysbury Boat House. Boat repairs, sales etc.  Family business on site since 1982.


Remenham Park
Remenham House, the house appears to have been a hotel in the 1960s but is now let into flats.
Wyrardisbury or Remenham Manor, owes its name to the Remenham family, who lived here in the 13th and 14th owning a mill in Wraysbury and later a weir and fishery. In 1538 the estate called Remenham, passed to the Stonor family and was later sold.


Sources
British History on line. Web site
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Windsor and Maidenhead Council. Web site

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