Tuesday, 19 April 2011

Thames Tributary Blacks Brook - Raphael Park

Thames Tributary Blacks Brook
The Brook continues to flow southwards towards the River Rom

Post to the south Romford
Post to the north Rise Park


Bobs Lane
A site of local nature importance

Brook Road
A ‘Modern Homes’ exhibition in 1934 intended to sell more here and on Eastern Avenue. 35 houses were built in the two roads. These houses are smooth rendered in the fashion of the time.
1
Modern style house

3
Class D house by Leonard Thornton White

5 7 9
modern style houses

13
Class C House built 1934 by Geoffrey Ransome

15
Class C House by J.Moore Simpson

19

18 20 30 modern style houses

Eastern Avenue East
The road was built in 1936 and changed the aspirations of the 1911 exhibition and plans. A subsequent ‘Modern Homes’ exhibition in 1934 intended to sell more on Eastern Avenue. 35 houses were built here and in Brook Road. Gradually developers opted for ribbon development here and these houses are smooth rendered in the fashion of the time.
320 Built in 1934 by Holford, Stephenson and Yorke in rendered brick. Cost £386 to build
324 Built in 1934 by Holford, Stephenson and Yorke
332 334 336 338 340 343 344 346 348 350 all modern style houses as above.

Heaton Grange Road
Houses - Milford, Rosemary, Chelsworth, Rosemore, Brookside – are all in the conservation area. Houses in this road were designed for the 1911 competition.

Meadway
Houses in this road were designed for the 1911 competition.
1 Cottage by Herbert Welch who won 2nd prize in the £375 class
7 designed by Percy Houston who also won 1st prize for a cottage design at Letchworth Garden City

Parkway
Houses in this road were designed for the 1911 competition. Provides the boundary of the suburb with views over the park and its pond. These plots were reserved for the more expensive houses.
Central area of woodland is a covenanted open space and registered town green
10 plane tree outside it is said to be the largest London plane in Essex.
34 by Reginald Longden and this won 2nd prize in the £500 class of house.
38, 40, 44, 46-64 were all 1911 exhibition houses
42 designed by Fair & Myer inside the house has a beam ceiling and inglenook. This was a 1911 exhibition house
54 Georgian design of house by Geoffrey Lucas which took 1st prize in the £500 class of house

Pettits Lane
The road was called after a local estate owned by the Pettit family in the 13th.
Marshalls Park School. The school was opened in 1936 as Pettits Senior Council School. In the 1950s it became Pettits Secondary (Modern).In 1973 it was amalgamated with Romford County Technical School as Marshalls Park Comprehensive. In 1999 the two schools combined here. Marshalls was the name of a house which stood roughly in this area.
Marshalls was a house in Romford and estate which covered an area was bounded by Main Road, North Street, Pettits Lane, and Pettits Boulevard. The name dates to 1213 when Gilbert Marschal leased land here.

Pettits Lane North
Rise Park Parade. Modernist shops
Fire Station. Essex County Council 1960 with dramatic practice tower.

Raphael Park
Part of the parkland that surrounded Gidea Hall. Named after Sir Herbert Raphael, a Liberal MP, who presented it to the town in 1904. It is one of a series of parks which stretch northwards from the railway line at Romford to Havering atte Bower. Much of it is grassland with trees and shrubs but the western area is a nature conservation area and the western boundary of the park follows the line of Black's Brook. The brook is dammed at the junction with Main Road to form a shallow lake with two wooded islands.

Reed Pond Walk
Houses in this road were designed for the 1911 competition.
An overgrown central green and copse set aside as an open area and is now a registered village green,
23 designed by Clough Williams-Ellis although chimneystacks have been removed. Regency Revival
28 designed by Crickmer
29 at the bend in the road designed by Edwin Gunn for 'the typical suburban family with one servant’. The chimney is to one side to allow for a servant’s bedroom in the attic.
30 designed by Crickmer
31 designed in Old English style by Reginald Longden may have won 2nd prize in the £500 class of house
32 designed by Cecil A. Sharp this has a long range to the street and a thick chimneystack and Colour washed brick mixed
33 designed by Parker & Unwin with Voyseyesq features. Inside Moveable partitions allowed for the subdivision of the main room.
36 by M.H. Baillie Scott as a non-identical pair, linked by a low wall, to no 38. Has pargetting of grape vines and inside, fire grates with similar motifs 'modelled by Mr. Bankart'. This was shown as a furnished house for the exhibition with 'wall hangings and fabrics made by the Deutsche Werkstatten', cottage furniture by Heal's. In the front garden is the base of a small sundial, designed by Scott.
38 designed by M.H. Baillie Scott one as a non-identical pair, linked by a low wall, with 36.

Risebridge Road
Houses in this road were designed for the 1911 competition.

Romford garden suburb
Some houses in this area were part of the "Romford Garden Suburb" which was held in 1910/11 as an exhibition of town planning on the Gidea Hall and Balgores Estates. It was made up of 159 houses designed by more than 100 prominent architects. A competition was held for the best designs of houses costing £500 and £375. The project was promoted by a company founded by three Liberal MP's linked to Hampstead Gardens Suburb - Herbert Raphael, John Tudor Walters and Charles McCurdy. A later exhibition was held in the 1930s.

1 comment:

Chiltern Birder said...

I was brought up in Rise Park in the 50s and some of the names I recognise only from the map:
Bob's Lane - always known locally as Dirty Dick's although there was never any story to go with the name.
Rise Park Parade - simply The White Shops due to the whitewashed rendering.
Raphael Park - always known as Raphaels Park.
Blacks Brook - the name simply wasn't known locally, the brooks in Rise Park and Raphaels Park never had specific names.