Monday, 8 May 2017

Bayford

Ashedene Road
Baker Arms Pub. The pub is named for Sir William Baker who purchased the local manor in 1757. The pub was once a row of cottages and has been a Macmullan house since 1946.
Telephone Exchange - with phone box outside
Smithy – this is shown on older maps as standing next to the pub on the corner with Bayford Green.

Bayford Brook
Bayford Brook is a minor tributary of the River Lea. It forms in the hills north of Bayford and in this square runs southwards alongside the belt of woodland and roughly parallel to the railway on its eastern side.  It is joined by a winterbourne stream from Great Groves

Bayford Green
Bayford Place farm
Warren House. 18th house with stables, where they have an annual musical gardens day,
Manor House. Late medieval house attached to a royal manor granted in 1547 to John Knighton.It has been enlarged and altered ever since. Later became a farmhouse until the early 20th. The middle area is the later medieval house.

Brickendon Lane
When the station was built in 1924 the road was a footpath.
Bayford School. The current school is now to the south in Ashendene but an earlier school stood on the corner with Bayford Green on the site of what is now Fourways.
Homestead Moat. This is partly filled in but the remainder of the ditch is wide and still wet
Bayford Station. This opened in 1924 and lies between Hertford North and Cuffley stations on the Great Northern Railway. Originally it could only be reached via a bridle path. There was a small waiting hut on the platforms and a booking office on the upside
Goods yard, This was very small and hardly used.
Brook Farm. Agricultural contractors.

Great Groves
Great Groves is ancient semi-natural woodland which is part Broxbourne Woods. The main tree species are oak and ash with hornbeam understorey.  There are also wild service. It is a hilly wood which is surrounded on three out of four sides by a sinuous bank and ditch system. Some of the banks are topped by huge hornbeam stubbs which were branches laid to make a stock-proof barrier against horses or cattle in the surrounding fields. Many old woods were embaned in this way and the size of these hornbeam stools would indicate a considerable age. The wood is now managed by a dedicated group with a very good website.

Stocking Lane
“an old road running north-west and south-east through the parish”

Well Row
Pond 
Willow Row. This is a row of  houses behind the pond

Sources
Baker’s Arms. Web site
Bayford Musical Gardens. Web site
British History Online. Hertfordshire. Web site
British Listed Buildings, Web site
Great Groves. Web site
Wikipedia. As appropriate

No comments: