Wednesday, 9 May 2012

Lesser Moselle - Wood Green

The Lesser Moselle
The Lesser Moselle rises in this area and flows eastwards

Post to the north Palmers Green
Post to the west Wood Green
Post to the south Wood Green
Post to the east White Hart Lane

Arcadian Gardens
Built on the land of the Chitts Hill Estate
New Testament Church of God. This was St. James at Bowes church built 1909. The Bowes Park Congregational church had begun as a hall and schoolrooms, in 1902. This brick church adjoining the hall was registered in 1912. After the congregation united with Presbyterian Church in 1950, it became the United Church of Saint James-at-Bowes. The New Testament Church of God bought it in 1977 and it is now the Cathedral of Praise

Glendale Avenue
This was called Back Lane or Blind Lane. It was built as a carriage drive on the line of a green lane from the High Road to Chitts Hill.
St.Thomas More School. This was built as Wood Green County School in. 1910 as a mixed grammar school for Middlesex County Council. It was also called Glendale. Wood Green was amalgamated with Trinity County School in 1962 and then moved.  The premises then became Woodside School. In 1967 under the comprehensive scheme the buildings were passed to St. Thomas More Upper School. St Thomas More Roman Catholic School is mixed comprehensive.  It was founded in 1952 at Holcombe Road and is now a specialist sports college.

Medesenge Way
On the site of Greentrees Hospital

Norfolk Avenue
The Old Course of the New River – the 100 ft contour, which it followed, crosses the southern end of the road between what are now sports grounds. However no remains appear to be identified here.

Perth Road
The northern end of the road was once called Snakes Lane
Zion Church.  In 1929 the Salvation Army had a hall here in which had been given up by 1954 and which subsequently became a warehouse. The Zion Church took over this building in the mid 1990s.

St Paul's Rise
On the site of Greentrees Hospital

Swaffam Way
This is a footpath accessing allotments

Sylvan Avenue
Built on the site of Chitts Hill House after its demolition in the 1890s. Chitts Hill House was built for the City merchant James Clark, followed by Quaker banker John Overend in 1815 and his family remained there until 1867. Samuel Page a City tea dealer lived there until 1881. The grounds, through which the old course of the New River ran until 1852, were admired by Keane in his Beauties of Middlesex

Tottenhall Road.
Old Course of the New River.  This wan on the 100 ft contour which runs eastwards alongside Tottenhall Road as far as Empire Avenue. It then swings south and west again, skirting a small hill referred to on old maps as Clay Hill.
Tottenhall Infants School. Built in 1914 by Middlesex County Council it was used as an auxiliary war hospital until 1923. It is spacious as schools by Council in the developing outer suburbs were given more space.  It opened as Tottenhall Infant School in 1924 with 99 pupils.  In 2004 a new school building was built under a PFI agreement.
St. Michael at Bowes Primary School
Tottenhall Sports Ground. This was originally set up as Middlesex County Council open space
Boundary Playing Fields
Greentrees Hospital. This was the Southgate Isolation Hospital, built by Southgate Council, and opened in 1902. It was named Greentrees in 1948 when it joined the NHS. It became a maternity annex for the North Middlesex Hospital and later a children's hospital. It then treated the chronically ill and, latterly a geriatric hospital. It closed in 1988 and has been demolished. The site is now housing. A plaque records the site.
101 The Bird in Hand. This was once called The Red Bull

White Hart Lane
The Lesser Moselle rises near the junction with Wolves Lane and it then flows eastwards parallel with White Hart Lane.
Woodside High School. This is the old White Hart Lane School with a name change in 2006 in order to improve its reputation. Wood Green County Grammar School was an amalgamation of Trinity County School and Glendale school and they moved into these buildings in 1962. In addition the upper school of Somerset school took over the buildings in White Hart Lane built for the grammar school in 1938 and enlarged in 1960. Some girls from Parkwood School also came here. In 1967 under the comprehensive scheme it became.   The upper tier Wood Green comprehensive school
New River Sports Centre in the junction with Wolves Lanes.  The name refers to the Old Course of the river which would have passed this corner. It is also known as the New River Stadium, is an athletics stadium. It is used by London Skolars Rugby, Haringey & Enfield Athletics Club, Wood Green Weightlifting Club and Haringey Rhinos rugby union club. The Olympic Suite is based in the grandstand, and there are also many community sports activities
St. George’s Industrial Estate
Wonder Bakeries founded 1937
White Hart Lane Potteries. Joseph South had a pottery in Dysons Road, Edmonton in 1860. He son, Samuel South moved the business to White Hart Lane, in 1886. The pottery closed in 1960. The business was in making flower pots – and supplying the Lea Valley Glass house industry. Pots were individually made by a line of potters with a power driven wheel. The firm had their own steam engines and boilers to provide power for the wheels and the kilns. Pots varied in size from thimbles for cacti to huge pots made to order. There were specialist pots for – for example – rhubarb.

Wolves Lane
St.Cuthbert. Built 1906-7 by J.S. Alder. It was only part built. To the rear there is a church hall built in 1919 church hall. 
Wood Green Cemetery. Built in 1996, this tried to provide an innovative approach to providing burial space, by a cemetery village. It also has a special burial section for Muslims. It is now run by a private company.
Wolves Lane allotment site

Sources
Essex Lopresti. Exploring the New River
Pevsner and Cherry. London North
History of Middlesex,
History of Wood Green web site
London Borough of Haringey website
Lost Hospitals of London web site
Middlesex Churches
St. Thomas More School web site
Tottenhall Infants School web site

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