Monday, 19 October 2009

The London/Buckinghamshire border - Stanwellmoor

TQ 04 76
The London, Hillingdon/Buckinghamshire, Spelthorne boundary goes along Airport Way

The Duke of Northumberland's River flows south along the line of the Perimeter Road
The Longford River flows south along the line of the Perimeter Road
The River Colne flows southwards

Post to the west Poyle Stanwellmoor
Post to the south Stanwell
Post to the north Longford

On the border
Airport Way
Built as the result of pressure following the construction of Terminal 4 in the late 1970s.

On the London, Hillingdon side of the border
Bedfont Court
In the 1930s Surrey County Council established 24 small-holdings here. they have small houses with steeply pitched roofs and eaves at first-floor level. Threatened by Terminal 5 and so demolished.

Burrows Hill Lane
In the 1930s Surrey County Council established 24 small-holdings here. they have small houses with steeply pitched roofs and eaves at first-floor level. Now under Terminal 5.
Reservoir and wild life site, now lost to Terminal 5.

Silverbeck Weir

Spout Lane North
Spout Arch

On the Buckinghamshire, Spelthorne side of the border
Horton Road
Upper Mill. The Mill dates from the late 14th although there is some confusion as to names – both a ‘North Mill’ and “Upper Mill” are recorded. The Upper Mill is mentioned in 1630 and the current site is known to be 18th and was called the New Mill in 1771. It was a paper-mill in the 18th and changed to corn at the end of the century. This use continued into the 20th by which time it was powered by both steam and water but it was damaged in a serious fire of 1900.. By the 1950 it had been used for at least 20 years by Ayers Asthma Cures and was still driven by water . Part of the building was damaged by a bomb in the Second World War. It was used for shots in film Geneveive which are supposed to be of the A23. it remains as a red brick building dating from about 1900 and has been altered since. It is now converted to warehouses and office use. There is a timber jettied bay rising through the second and third storeys is a distinctive feature
Old Mill House. two prominent chimney stacks, stone dressed bay windows and late 19th sash windows.

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry.
Spelthorne. Industrial Archaeology
Surrey History

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