Hendon

 

Clayton Field

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Colindale Avenue

Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections - Central Public Health Laboratory.  Founded in 1907 as the Government Lymph Establishment for making vaccines.  A forceful pyramid of laboratories by Robert Matthew, Johnson-Marshall & Partners, 1981-5.  The earlier buildings were by Maxwell Ayrton & Partners, 1950-3, reinforced concrete construction, brick-faced but with concrete cornice and other details.

Corner Mead

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Five Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Further Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

 

Hendon aerodrome,

The aerodrome was developed from 1910 as a private venture by the pilot, aircraft designer and manufacturer Claude Grahame-White and became well known as a centre for training pilots, test flights and flying displays. Rapid growth took place during the First World War, when the aerodrome was used also by the Royal Air Force and other companies, with expansion of Aerodrome Road onto the present site of the Police Training College.  Became RF Hendon in 1927 and aircraft also continued to be made here. The government bought out Grahame-White in 1925; the aerodrome was closed after 1945. Not suitable for jets but at one time the RAF centre.  RAF Hendon only officially closed in 1988. 

Buildings and their use are all Part of aviation archaeology. Much of the site covered with housing but aerial views show the shape of the site and the runway end. A railway line had run round the air field in a couplet loop. Grahame White chose -the site for his airfield because of its nearness to tram routes on the Edgeware Road - and he developed it with joy riding and weekend meetings, calling it the London Aerodrome.

Roundabout. Flights started at Hendon by Everitt Edgecumbe who had a shed on the site of the present roundabout where he put an aeroplane called the 'Grasshopper or 'hedge-hopper'. This shed had been used by Graham White's competitor in a flying race to Manchester.

Some readers will be aware of the excellent magazine London Railway Record, available from such venues as London’s Transport Museum, Motorbooks of Leicester Square, and the Ian Allan shop at Lower Marsh, Waterloo. The January 2007 issue features a nine-page illustrated article by John Butcher on ‘The Hendon Factory Branch’. This was the short-lived Midland Railway/Grahame White company branch off the Bedford-St Pancras line that left the main line at Silkstream Junction, Colindale, crossed the German Prisoner-of-War built Aerodrome Road into the Hendon ‘London Aerodrome’ airfield, ran right around the airfield boundary, and terminated in a fan of sidings on Edgware Road just north of the former Tramway Depot on the Hyde. Travellers could even book tickets to the small halt ‘ Hendon (Factory Platform)’ just inside the camp on Aerodrome Road The line opened in August 1918, closing in early 1921, though the tracks survived in situ to c.1930, requiring a bridge in the Northern Line embankment still visible in Montrose Park, and even today a small engine shed also survives in Montrose Park.

 

Hundred Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Great Field

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Lan Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Longfield

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Near Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Satchell Mead

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

South Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

White Acre

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Wiggins Mead

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

Withers Mead

field-names have been used in a concentrated way in roads built on the site of Hendon aerodrome. The regularity of the arrangement of the streets and their names) may seem sufficiently unusual to provoke some scepticism about the authenticity of this group of names

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