Raynes Park

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Abbot Avenue:

Pumping station sewage

Approach Road

Built 1913 to link Kingston Road and Grand Drive. Mostly built by P.J. Dixon and his brother. Built on vestry land called Poors Wood – not posh enough so called Bushey Mead. Streets known locally as the twelve apostles.

Bronson Road

Building after 1900

Bushey Mead

Terraces for the upwardly mobile. 12 parallel street finished by 1907.

Bushey Road

Housing from 1900

Chestnut Road

Building after 1900

Coombe Lane

100-102 Cavern

Grand Drive

By Richard Garth as part of development of West Barnes Park in 1868.

Kingston Road:

180 almshouses;

Logic Lodge eighteenth century pre-Raphaelite painting there;

Dorset Hall eighteenth century

Kingston Road

Housing from 1900

 

Lambton Road

Wimbledon Column - main drainage ventilation pipe. Probably installed by William Santo Crimp Engineer to the Wimbledon Local 1881- 1890. The Wimbledon Sewage Farm was then in a bad state, and Crimp set out to remedy this. With ventilation pipes, carried up trees, houses or other convenient objects, or by specially constructed lamp-posts

Railway Line

Wimbledon Junction. Also West Barnes or Epsom Junction. Coombe Lane Bridge junction. Here a branch line to Epsom leaves the London and South West Railway main line.  This follows a route surveyed by Joseph Locke in 1842 but was built by a Wimbledon and Dorking Railway in 1857.   The junction fell out of use in 1868 when tracks dedicated to this railway were laid from Wimbledon Station, and additionally was extended on to New Maldon. Further changes made in 1884 with a fly under.

Raynes Park,

Commemorating the name of Edward Rayne, 1778-1847, on whose land the railway station was built. Rayne sold some of his land to them and so they named the station after him. Carter, seed merchant,

Rayne's Park Station, 1871. Between Wimbledon and New Maldon and also Motspur Park on South Western Rail.  Built by the Wimbledon and Dorking Railway. Was called Epsom Junction before the station was built to Epsom. Not much traffic on it then. Local developer Richard Garth paid towards the station but it was named after the Rayne family, who had campaigned for the station. The station was upgraded in 1933 with a new ticket and parcels office and a van yard. A new footbridge to connect rebuilt platforms.  The cost was offset by eight lock up shops to rent.

Freight sidings with facilities to transport cattle to Guildford market.  It was in the V of the up and down Epsom lines and closed 1969. However it was used as an engineer’ office until 1983. 

Worple Road

St.Mark's Place church burnt down 1966, new church 1968.

Worple Road

Means bridle track part of Scorpio’s claw

Wimbledon Column - main drainage ventilation pipe. Probably installed by William Santo Crimp Engineer to the Wimbledon Local 1881- 1890. The Wimbledon Sewage Farm was then in a bad state, and Crimp set out to remedy this. With ventilation pipes, carried up trees, houses or other convenient objects, or by specially constructed lamp-posts,


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