Merton

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Church Path

The chief remains of the village. Old path.  Used to have thatched cottage on it

10     Fine wrought-iron gate formerly to a c17 house

Contemporary brick walling,

Plain vicarage of c. 1800,

Small terrace of cottages,

Merton Cottage, Georgian with a Victorian refronting. From 1734-1940;

Merton Institute

15-27 1809

Merton

‘Mertone’ 949 in an Anglo-Saxon charter, ‘Meretone’ 1086 in the Domesday Book, ‘Meritone’ 12th century, ‘Mirton alias Marten’ 1679, that is "farmstead or estate by the pool', from Old English ‘mere’ and ‘tun’. The 'pool' was no doubt in or by the River Wandle which flows through Merton; ‘Merton Mill’ is marked on the river on the Ordnance Survey map of 1816. The original settlement would have been near to where the old Roman road from London to Chichester crossed the river, thus providing a convenient watering place and overnight halt for early travellers. The identification of Merton with a place called Merantun, where according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, King Cynewulf of Wessex met his death in 786, is exceedingly doubtful; the naming of the recently built Merantun Way in the town is therefore simply meretricious and deceptive. In medieval times there was a large Augustinian priory here, founded in 1114 there is only a distant echo of its existence in the name Merton Abbey, marked thus on the Ordnance Survey map of 1816,  for an area where the priory once stood. The Manor also had property in the City. ‘South Merton’ is on record as early as 1324. ‘Merton Park’ was developed as a garden suburb on by John Innes. Old roads intersect the John Innes' development. Innes genetics all on Scorpio. Innes founded secretive Masonic Lodge. On the Virgin where Lady Hamilton lived. In the pleasantly secluded area round the church, traces of the old village blend happily with varied late c19 suburban development. Squeezed between Wimbledon and Mitcham.

Inns estate built 1870s for city gents in the Queen Anne revival style by Quartermaine

National School 1870 paid for by hermit millionaire, R.Thornton

Melrose Road

2-30.The next estate architect, J. S. Brocklesby, added some sensitive and attractive Arts and Crafts houses. C.1906-11, include a range of pretty whitewashed cottages, with low-pitched roofs and angled bays. Cottages for the farmer

Melrose School. A low, irregular gabled range, close to the old church, appropriately villagey in scale. Original parts 1870, picturesque but tough Gothic, by Aldridge & Willis; several additions, including an extensive one dated 1901, by H. G. Quartermain

Kingston Road:

180 1797 nice by the church, homes for five poor widows of the parish.

Manor House looks Georgian but earlier

Dorset Hall

Long Lodge

Manor Club John Innes's establishment by H. G. Quartermain, 1890—1. Founded as a working men's club,

Merton Public Hall, John Innes's establishment by H. G. Quartermain 1900 as a Masonic lodge

Mostyn Road

Horse chestnut trees, John Innes. Main thoroughfare of the new estate, broad, generously planted avenues laid out c. 1870. The earliest development, very plain, yellow brick, of c.  1870-5, can be found. It contrasts sharply with what followed. The deliberate creation of a garden suburb, with generous planting of trees and holly hedges (a distinguishing feature of the area), allied to picturesque and artistic houses in the up-to-date Domestic Revival style by the estate architect. G. Quatermain. Examples can be found from c. 1880 to just after 1900 - tile-hanging, half- timbering, Queen Anne windows, gables and bargeboards, and much else.

40-50 cottages for estate workers, then became Victorian houses for families;

17; 27; 29 infill flint barn of cement

33 The Flint Barn.  The estate architect, J. S. Brocklesby later work is a group of flint-walled and pantiled houses of the mid 1920s impressive, barn-like, and allegedly constructed from materials from old farm buildings.

John Innes Horticultural Institute.  Part of Rutlish School, established with money left by John Innes. It was opened in 1910 and moved from Merton in 1953. Buildings of c. 1910 and later.

John Innes Park, Originally the grounds of the manor house. Little altered John Innes built it for himself and left the park to the people of Merton with strict instructions on layout.  The secluded evergreen walks give it a delightfully intimate character. Entrance lodge, cottage, and archway by H. Q. Quartermain, probably c. 1890.  The wooden bandstand, handsome brick walls, and a rustic cricket pavilion date from the park's opening in 1909.

Railway Line

The Sutton line, built 1929, curves away from the main lines on an embankment ‘the wall of death’ – for a mile and half through the station. which doubles the track between Wimbledon and Wimbledon Chase.

Sheridan Road

Main thoroughfare of the new estate, broad, generously planted avenues laid out c. 1870. Plane and holly John Innes layout.  Greater London Council tried to demolish it in 1971. The deliberate creation of a garden suburb, with generous planting of trees and holly hedges (a distinguishing feature of the area), allied to picturesque and artistic houses in the up-to-date Domestic Revival style by the estate architect. G. Quatermain. Examples can be found from c. 1880 to just after 1900 - tile-hanging, half- timbering, Queen Anne windows, gables and bargeboards, and much else.

Three Flemish style flint houses, southern in the centre of the triangle. 

19; 38; 40.  The estate architect, J. S. Brocklesby later work is a group of flint-walled and pantiled houses of the mid 1920s:

Wimbledon Chase Station.  5th January 1930. Between Wimbledon and South Merton on Thameslink and Southern Trains. Built by Southern Railway plus a deal with London Electric Railway. There is no such thing as Wimbledon Chase – ‘railway snobbery’ -  the station is in Merton where the district had been built up in 1900/14.  Built in 1929, the facade on the main road in white glazed brick with a never used lift tower for luggage.  It was the prototype for other Southern Region stations in the ‘marine’ style.

Watery Lane,

Very old road, used to be a stream there, corner cottage

Rutlish School.  Victorian part is the old manor house built by John Innes

 School buildings also part of John Innes Horticultural Institute.  A total rebuilding c. 1870-1900 of a former farmhouse, most of it by H. G. Quartermain: an eclectically picturesque composition with Tudor doorway, oriel window, and gables and bargeboards. Good panelling and plasterwork inside. Undistinguished school buildings of 1957 next to it.

8-12 As Merton Park was also a farming estate, cottages designed by Quartermain for farm and estate workers are just round the corner from City men's homes. c. 1895-8. The result is great diversity both of scale and size, far more so than in the more famous Bedford Park, for example

15 estate architect, J. S. Brocklesby, lived here.  He added some sensitive and attractive Arts and Crafts houses. 1907

17 Steep Roof. Estate architect, J. S. Brocklesby designed and moved into this c. 1908 - a steep roof indeed, with minute dormers high up.

Manor House plaque to John Innes 1829-1904 saying 'founder of the John Innes Horticultural Institute, lived here'.  Innes, born in London, made his fortune as a property developer. He bought the Merton Park Estate in 1867 and the stately manner in which he lived, contrasted sharply with the mass density estates he built to house the hordes of farm workers, and their large families, who were leaving the countryside to live and work in London. "Instant slums" was how one social worker put it. Innes, in order to ingratiate himself with the establishment, promoted horticultural experiments and research and left much of his fortune for that purpose. Despite his charitable efforts he didn't receive the knighthood he so much wanted and which he thought he deserved. Plaque erected 1978.

Wilton Crescent

A simpler red brick, roughcast, and terracotta style appears in his last buildings c. 1897-1904


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