Holloway Road

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Post to the east Highbury, Drayton Park

Post to the south Caldedonian Road and Barnsbury 

Post to the west Tufnel Park

Post to the north Upper Holloway



Adam's Place
1979, an intimate version of multi-level housing.

Andover Row 
Barmouth House 
Carew Close 
Chard House 
Methley House

Alsen Road. GLC Estate 1978 part of overall regeneration of the area
Ray Walk
Roth Walk
Todds Walk 
Tomlins Walk 
Yeovil House

Annette Road 
Lord Palmerston 
Shelburne Lower School 
Loraine Cottages

Bardolph Road
Beacon Hill

Belfont Walk 

Biddestone Road

Bovay Place


Caedmon Road

Camden Road
Was previously called Maiden Lane.  Was called Head Lane.  The road was built in the nineteenth century to connect Camden and Islington  and was part of the Turnpike Route from Camden Town to Tottenham from the 1820s.  It is named after Charles Pratt, Duke of Camden who acquired this area through marriage and subsequently developed the area. Built up along the Islington section from the 1850s with very large paired houses, especially elaborate
Athenaeum Literary and Scientific Institutions stood on the Parkhurst Road corner.  This had been designed by F.R.Meeson and was used as a banqueting hall and studio.  Demolished in 1956 and the site  Subsequently used by a petrol station.
Camden Road Baptist Chapel. Built 1853-4 by C. G. Searle of Kentish rag stone.. Designed in the early c19 wayt - the model of collegiate chapels.  It has a stair-tower which originally had spires.  Had additionally a hall and classroom.  Converted to a hostel
350-352, large houses gabled and rendered, with strapwork over the windows.
356 Cambridge House  1971
392-418 was previously called 1-3 Hillmarton Villas West
333-351 Edward Terrace
Belmore House 1971
Bracewood Arms, 1840.  Fashionable for dubious delights, balloon ascents, duels
Saxonbury Court  1960
Alfred Place 1851-1853
Barnes House
Castle View House 1975
Fairdene Court 1962
Poynder Court 1973

Floor cloth factory as a country retreat
Hall of 1858
John Barnes Library. Tucked behind an embankment. Designed in c. 1974 by Andrews, Sherlock & Partners with A. Head, Borough Architect. The ground floor has the junior library, and there is an entrance for adults at first-floor level. Inside, exposed steel trusses and top lit reading. Named for Alderman John Barnes and he opened it in 1974.
Was previously called Maiden Lane.  Was called Head Lane.  The road was built in the nineteenth century to connect Camden and Islington  and was part of the Turnpike Route from Camden Town to Tottenham from the 1820s.  It is named after Charles Pratt, Duke of Camden who acquired this area through marriage and subsequently developed the area. Built up along the Islington section from the 1850s with very large paired houses, especially elaborate
Camden Road Baptist Chapel. Built 1853-4 by C. G. Searle of Kentish rag stone.. Designed in the early c19 wayt - the model of collegiate chapels.  It has a stair-tower which originally had spires.  Had additionally a hall and classroom.  Converted to a hostel
Bracewood Arms, 1840.  Fashionable for dubious delights, balloon ascents, duels
Floor cloth factory as a country retreat
Hall of 1858
John Barnes Library. Tucked behind an embankment. Designed in c. 1974 by Andrews, Sherlock & Partners with A. Head, Borough Architect. The ground floor has the junior library, and there is an entrance for adults at first-floor level. Inside, exposed steel trusses and top lit reading. Named for Alderman John Barnes and he opened it in 1974.
Athenaeum Literary and Scientific Institutions stood on the Parkhurst Road corner.  This had been designed by F.R.Meeson and was used as a banqueting hall and studio.  Demolished in 1956 and the site  Subsequently used by a petrol station.

Cardoza Road


Cardwell Road

Chambers Road

Corinth Road

Cornwall Place
Mount Carmel RC School
Convent of Our Lady of Sion
Eden Grove Community Centre
Willow Court 

Corporation Street 

Crayford Road
St George, 1972-5 by Clive Alexander, the replacement for Truefitt's St George's of 1865-8 in Tufnell Park Road. A forceful red brick cube anchored on splayed plinths, with a flat lead-faced roof projecting. Interior with exposed brick, flat ceiling on thin steel piers, and restrained lighting: obscured clerestory glass, clear glass in the narrow slits below. In the front a large wooden cross and free-standing bell-frame.

Dunford Road

Eden Grove 
Electric Lighting Station central station, opened 18 96, octagonal chimney, closed 1948. Later screen wall with Secessionst oriel. Islington's first generating works glazed red brick with progressive details and moulded lettering.

Notre Dame of Sion School founded in the 1870s.  

1805 New River Co., abandoned 1815
Sacred Heart of Jesus. 1869. RC. By F. H. Pownall. Hammerbeam roof Sanctuary remodelled 1960-1 by Archard & Partners.  Stained glass c19 and some post-1945 by T Grew
Westbrook House core of LCC estate.  Between the wars, now private.  Completed by 1936.  Formal Neo-Georgian front; the back, to Eden Grove, has access balconies within giant arcades.
Ringcross School, from between the wars, two storeys, with pretty  iron balconies.
Schools from the former church 1854, a tall, gaunt Italianate composition of eleven bays with arcaded ground floor and central pedimemal gable.

Fairdene Court


Frederica Street

Freegrove Road

Geary Street 

Hartham Close,

Hartham Road

Harvist Estate
Harvist Estate for Islington 1967-70 with unappealing system-built nineteen-storey towers, reclad 1996-7, rearing up close to the railway line behind lower terraces     

Hillmarton Road
Field Court
61 site of St. Mary's Liberal Catholic Church
Jacobin Lodge
Nicholls
St.Luke. 1859 Kentish Rag. Bombed and rebuilt

Holbrook Close

Hollingsworth Street 
15-16 Original Battersea Dogs Home founded by Mary Tealby, 1860, for lost and stray dogs


Holloway Road
Very muddy and 'wash'   was the first red route in London. Features in films 'The Chain’.
Motor bus depot, was stables converted for buses, closed 1971
Firm making small pressed and turned parts for aircraft stayed there because of skilled labour
Artisan flats of London County Council 'five stories total height of Road
Holloway Road Station 15th December 1906. Between Arsenal and Caledonian Road on the Piccadilly Line. Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway.  Designed by Leslie Green.  Double spiral escalator up and down, moving at 100 ft per minute in one of the lift shafts but never used, still there in 1919. the idea of American engineer Jesse Reno who thought the idea up while livingin London. It was a double helix with a continuous plafirm moving ast 100 ft per minute in both directions.  Not clear if it was ever used or always thought to be unsafe.  Some of it is now in a museum but there is nothing but the shaft on site.  One of the cross passages has an electrical switch room in it. ‘GNR’ and ‘BR’ on the outside.  Well-preserved example frontage with rows of large arches; ox-blood faience outside, cream- and brown-tiled inside with handsome lettering. Built as Northern line station. Opened at Ring Cross and built along with the main line railway from Kings Cross to Finsbury Park. The Tunnel is 21' 2 1/2”, side by side with stairways in between, electric lifts.  Opened provisionally in 1906.  majority of features remain intact.  Retains all its gilded exterior lettering despite poor condition of the elevation.  Most complete ticket hall of any of Green’s stations.  Original fire hydrant cabinet. Frieze with pomegranite design.  Wooden clock and railings are all original. 
Holloway and Caledonian Road Station 1852 . Great Northern Railway ticket checking platform only.  South west side of Holloway Road close to where the tube is now. Opened as ‘Holloway’. 1856 became a proper station. 1901 rebuilt and renamed ‘Holloway and Caledonian Road’. 1915 closed and demolished. Some parts of the entrances remain.
Facade of Great Northern Railway’s coal yard receiving office became a second hand shop
London Metropolitan University was University of North London, Created in 1993 from the Polytechnic of North London, which had its origins in the Northern Polytechnic Institute, founded 1896.
Tower Building opened 1966, replacing the old main building of 1896-7 by Charles Bell. A brutalist logical design, strongly expressed. Bold horizontals at each floor level and equally forceful vertical emphasis on the service core and plant room. Eleven storeys cantilevered over two recessed ones; long low wine with concrete relief by William Mitchell. Disappointing interior Next to it a former extension to the original building: weak classical red brick facade, 1902 by A. W. Cooksey.
London Metropolitan University. White curved building 2000 by Rick Mather.
Glass Building, learning centre 1994 by Geoffrey Kidd Associates. Clichéd mirror-clad block
Graduate School. Daniel Libeskind building of 2004.
254-256 Phoebe Place
258-278 Railway Place
290 Dorset Place
292-306 Harriett Place
295 Holloway
304 Joe Meek’s studio where he recorded the Tornadoes and murdered his landlady.
312-332 Islington Scout Centre was Holloway Independent Chapel
338 Coronet Pub was previously a snooker club, but originally the Coronet Cinema, opened 1940 as the Savoy and ABC. Trim Art Deco front. Faience-clad
350-356 Jones Bros. Founded in 1867 and extended in the 1890s. Exuberant 1890s section. Extended in the 1890s.  The exuberant 1890s part survives, with a conical tower and clock over its big arched entrance, tall canted bays within multi-storey arches and rich stone details.  Waitrose replaced the earlier part c.1990, copying some of the Edwardian tricks in a half-hearted way, but failing to convince because of its squat supermarket proportions.
340-352 Johns Terrace
368 Jones' jewellers
373-393 Walters Buildings
383 Marlborough Building of the University 1960s intruder..  Built on the Site of the Marlborough Picture Theatre built 1905 by  Frank Matcham. This epic theatre of 1903 spent most of its life as a cinema before being replaced by an office block of shocking banality that dared to keep its name. 4 April 1930 had a Compton organ with the First French style wood console.
394 Selby, linen draper 
357 Holloway Stationers
378-402 Pleasant Row
399-407 Lansdowne Place
401 Parkhurst Theatre,
408-412 19th fronts
416-418 426-434 Marks and Spencer M&S, Chequered stonework
429-441 terrace with balconies and pairs of windows
430-456 Holloway Terrace
443 Tufnell Park Terrace
408-412, with emphatically pedimented c19 fronts,
416-418 Marks and Spencer has chequered stonework enlivening its 1930s stripped-classical house-style.
429-441, a terrace with cast-S balconies to, unusually, pairs of windows.
Tavern was Station Hotel
Motor bus depot, was stables converted for buses, closed 1971
Firm making small pressed and turned parts for aircraft stayed there because of skilled labour
Holloway and Caledonian Road Station 1852 . Great Northern Railway ticket checking platform only.  South west side of Holloway Road close to where the tube is now. Opened as ‘Holloway’. 1856 became a proper station. 1901 rebuilt and renamed ‘Holloway and Caledonian Road’. 1915 closed and demolished. Some parts of the entrances remain.
Facade of Great Northern Railway’s coal yard receiving office became a second hand shop
 London Metropolitan University was University of North London, Created in 1993 from the Polytechnic of North London, which had its origins in the Northern Polytechnic Institute, founded 1896.
Tower Building opened 1966, replacing the old main building of 1896-7 by Charles Bell. 
London Metropolitan University. 2000 by Rick Mather.
Glass Building, learning centre 1994 by Geoffrey Kidd Associates. 
Graduate School. Daniel Libeskind building of 2004.
258-278 Railway Place
338 Coronet Pub was previously a snooker club, but originally the Coronet Cinema, opened 1940 as the Savoy and ABC. Trim Art Deco front. Faience-clad
350-356 Jones Bros. Founded in 1867 and extended in the 1890s. Exuberant 1890s section. conical tower and clock over its big arched entrance, .  Waitrose replaced the earlier part c.1990, 
368 Jones' jewellers
383 Marlborough Building of the University 1960s intruder..  Built on the Site of the Marlborough Picture Theatre built 1905 by  Frank Matcham. This epic theatre of 1903 spent most of its life as a cinema before being replaced by an office block . 4 April 1930 had a Compton organ with the First French style wood console.
394 Selby, linen draper 
401 Parkhurst Theatre,
416-418 Marks and Spencer has chequered stonework enlivening its 1930s house-style.


Hornsey Road
Hornsey Road branches from Holloway Road.  It was an old lane used as an alternative route avoiding the steep Highgate Hill, until a shorter bypass was provided by Archway Road, in 1813.  Development around the southern end took off after Seven Sisters Road, was laid out in 1832.  A few little roadside villas of c. 1830-40, used as garages survived up to c.1970.  By c.1850 its southern end was fringed with stucco-trimmed terraces, with a network of small side streets.  Patchy Victorian survivals are now interspersed with an instructive variety of post-World War II housing types and some new open spaces.
Site of Road public toilets used by Joe Orton.  Gone now but south side wall before the pavement arch is lined with porcelain tiles
1 Tyrolese Cottage
47-171 Neville Terrace

Hornsey Road baths, and washhouse. Diving lady neon sign. 1930s.

Hornsey Street 

Stapleton House 

Hungerford Road

1A Matzdorf House. eco-house in timber, glass and flime. 
62 Mature town garden at the rear of Victorian terrace house which has been designed to maximise space for planting 
Hungerford School Among the best of numerous classic Board schools of the 1890s by T.J. Bailey. 1895-6, symmetrical with grand curved balconied turrets. With an Infants' School of 1968-70 by the GLC job architect Barry Wilson. Wedge-shaped teaching areas radiate from the main hall

Hungerford Road

Matzdorf House. eco-house in timber, glass and flime. 

62 Mature town garden at the rear of Victorian terrace house which has been designed to maximise space for planting and create several different sitting areas, views and moods. 

Hungerford School Among the best of numerous classic Board schools of the 1890s by T.J. Bailey. 1895-6, . With an Infants' School of 1968-70 by the GLC job architect Barry Wilson. Wedge-shaped teaching areas radiate from the main hall


Jackson Road


Keighley Close

Lister Mews

Loraine Estate
Cairns House 

Lough Road 
Dorinda Lodge 
20 Waterloo

Middleton Grove
1 Truefitt, the developer, lived there. Outside the Tufnell Park boundary, two Truefitt houses, slightly roguish c. 1859
8 the other Truefitt House

North Road
39a, a narrow tile-hung Domestic Revival house, possibly by Ernest George & Vaughan, 1865, who designed workshops and stables here.
London General Omnibus Company.  Former coach building premises built in 1900, stretch in a plain red and yellow brick line; converted in 1990 by United Work-space into designers' studios, restaurants etc.

Papworth Gardens
Laid out by London County Council. 1958. Flats picturesquely disposed

Parkhurst Road
Arcade, 1930, previously Parkhurst Hall, closed down when fights broke out at whist drives
New River original line  crossed Parkhurst Road
Flights Garage, coach garage, orange luxury coaches, Ambassadors Bus Co., 1923
Holloway Prison. Built in 1852 on a site used for the burial of cholera victims.  The original prison was demolished 1970. It had been designed as the City House of Correction by the City’s architect, Burning, 1849-51, and became a prison for women only in 1903. It had two front wings and four wings with 436 separate cells and large workrooms radiating from a tall central tower. The gatehouse and lodges and entrance block were copied from Caesar's Tower, Warwick Castle. Its replacement, 1970-7 is by Robert Matthew of  Johnson- Marshall & Partners with  fortified red brick walls round the perimeter, and informal grouping of red brick blocks round landscaped courts Home Office’s 1960s focus on remedial custody for women, There is a low-key entrance and anaemic Neo-Georgian prison officers' flats also from the 1970s. Past prisoners include Oscar Wilde, Mrs. Pankhurst and Christine Keeler.  Features in films 'Turn the Key Softly’.
Thames Aqueducts.  Ring main passes under here. Started from in 1960 but it Had been suggested in 1935 – a  tunnel to take water from the Thames above Teddington to North London.  It is built in 102in diameter tunnel in interlocking concrete rings for 19 miles, starts at Hampton Water Works and finishes at the Lockwood reservoir.  Built by Sir William Halcrow & Partners.
Barnsbury House
Bunning House
Fairweather House 
Hilton House
Holbrooke Court
Castle Pub 
Morgan School of Dancing
Prince Edward
Islington Boys Club was Swedenborgian Church
TA Drill Hall 
Crayford House 
McMorran House 
Pankhurst Court 
Whitby Court 

Penn Road
Penn Road Triangle. Managed by Vestry of Islington
Hammon House 
2a walled garden; 

Piper Close 

Pollard Close 

Quemerford Road 

Rhodes Street 
Adams Place 

Ring Cross 
Small hamlet at the junction with Benwell Road and Hornsey Road which later became subsumed into Lower Hollowayh.. It stands at the junction with an earlier route north which went via Crouch End and Muswell Hill and was known as Devil's Lane.  Its best-known feature was a gibbet where the rotting bodies of highwaymen were dangled in chains as a warning to others. 
Railway. Holloway Road makes a contact with the main railway line to York and Edinburgh, which was originally planned to follow the line of this mail coach highway, by passing under it 

Russett Crescent 

Shelburne Road 
Shelburne Road School 

Tabley Road

Thornton Court

Tollington Road

Walters Mews 

Walters Road

Widdenham Road
Loraine Mansions

Williamson Street
Isledon Court 
Penhros House
Vaynor House

Lough Road 

Dorinda Lodge 

20 Waterloo

Middleton Grove

1 Truefitt, the developer, lived there. Outside the Tufnell Park boundary, c. 1859

North Road

39a, a narrow tile-hung Domestic Revival house, possibly by Ernest George & Vaughan, 1865, who designed workshops and stables here.

London General Omnibus Company.  Former coach building premises built in 1900, stretch in a plain red and yellow brick line; converted in 1990 by United Work-space into designers' studios, restaurants etc.

Papworth Gardens

Laid out by London County Council. 1958. 

Parkhurst Road

Arcade, 1930, previously Parkhurst Hall, closed down when fights broke out at whist drives

New River original line  crossed Parkhurst Road

Flights Garage, coach garage, orange luxury coaches, Ambassadors Bus Co., 1923

Holloway Prison. Built in 1852 on a site used for the burial of cholera victims.  The original prison was demolished after 1970. It had been designed as the City House of Correction by the City’s architect, Burning, 1849-51, and became a prison for women only in 1903. It had two front wings and four wings with 436 separate cells and large workrooms radiating from a tall central tower. The gatehouse and lodges and entrance block were copied from Caesar's Tower, Warwick Castle. Its replacement, 1970-7 is by Robert Matthew of  Johnson- Marshall & Partners. It has fortified red brick walls round the perimeter, but, within this, there is an informal grouping of red brick blocks round landscaped courts which resemble a hall of residence rather than a prison made up of classrooms, workshops and community buildings to fulfil the Home Office’s 1960s focus on remedial custody for women, There is a low-key entrance and anaemic Neo-Georgian prison officers' flats also from the 1970s. Past prisoners include Oscar Wilde, Mrs. Pankhurst and Christine Keeler.  

Thames Aqueducts.  Ring main passes under here. Started from in 1960 but it Had been suggested in 1935 – a  tunnel to take water from the Thames above Teddington to North London.  It is built in 102in diameter tunnel in interlocking concrete rings for 19 miles, starts at Hampton Water Works and finishes at the Lockwood reservoir.  Built by Sir William Halcrow & Partners.

Castle Pub 

Morgan School of Dancing

Prince Edward

Islington Boys Club was Swedenborgian Church

TA Drill Hall 

Penn Road

Penn Road Triangle. Managed by Vestry of Islington

2a walled garden; long, shady, side entrance border; small seaside-themed front garden. 

Ring Cross 

Small hamlet at the junction with Benwell Road and Hornsey Road which later became subsumed into Lower Hollowayh.. It stands at the junction with an earlier route north which went via Crouch End and Muswell Hill and was known as Devil's Lane.  Its best-known feature was a gibbet where the rotting bodies of highwaymen were dangled in chains as a warning to others. 

Railway. Holloway Road makes a contact with the main railway line to York and Edinburgh, which was originally planned to follow the line of this mail coach highway, by passing under it 

Tollington Road

Sobell Leisure Centre. 1973. Dull sports spaces and an ice rink inside

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