Wednesday, 29 June 2011

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - High Laver

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The Brook continues to flow south towards the River Roding. It is joined by a tributary from the east and another from the west.


TL 52 09
Post to the north - High Laver - 52 10
Post to the west - Magdalen Laver - 51 09
Post to the east- High Laver - 53 09
Post to the south -Ashlyns - 52 08


High Laver Lane
All Saints Parish church, this dates from the 12th and altered since. It is built of flint rubble with some Roman brick, and clunch dressings. There is a tower in three stages. Inside are brasses with figures of a man in armour and a woman in headdress, bodice and full skirt. There are also several wall monuments including one to Locke and an inscription written by him.
Churchyard. The chest tomb of John Locke, philosopher, 1704, brick with stone slab and cast iron railings
High Laver Hall. 19th farmhouse. Now Ashlyns. Barns: one weather boarded and yellow brick and other red brick
The Thatched cottage.19th thatched building.

Harlow Road
Start Farm. A small timber framed farmhouse, which may be 16th
Oak tree – veteran tree approximately 250 years old in a field near Start Farm.

Sunday, 26 June 2011

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - Newhouse

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
A tributary to the brook flows westwards towards it


TL 54 09
Post to the east - High Laver -53 09
Post to the north -Little Laver - 54 10



Black Lane

Little Laver Road
Newhouse Farmhouse, 17th but inc ludes part of its earlier predecessor. Timber framed and plastered. . Moated site.

Thames Tributary Crispsey Brook - High Laver

Thames Tributary Crispsey Brook
The Brook flows south towards the River Roding
A tributary to the Cripsey Brook flows westwards


TL 53 09
Post to the west - High Laver 52 09
Post to the south - Moreton - 53 08
Post to the north - High Laver - 53 10
Post to the east Newhouse


Mill Lane
Poppin House

Watery Lane
America Farm
Verge on the west side and is considered a site of nature interest.

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - Watery Lane

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
Tributaries from east and west join Cripsey Brook which flows south towards the River Roding


TL 53 10
Post to the north - Matching Green 53 09
Post to the east Little Laver
Post to the south -Moreton - 53 09
Post to the west High Laver


Watery Lane
Sheepcroft Bridge
Ash Tree – thought to be 250 years old on the parish boundary

Church Farm

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - Little Laver

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
Two tributaries flow westwards to Cripsey Brook and the Roding


TL 54 10
Post to the north - Little Laver - 54 11
Post to the south - Newhouse - 54 09
Post to the west - Little Laver - 53 10

Little Laver Road
St.Mary the Virgin. This was the parish church but is now combined with Moreton. Originally 14th it was largely rebuilt in 1872.There are no remains before the 13th except the font. There is one bell dated 1674.
Little Laver Grange. 15th house timber framed and plastered, Inside are 16th brick arched fireplaces and an inglenook with timber surround. Moated site. This was the Little Laver Hall manor house, also known as Bouchiers Hall, for the area but was superseded by Little Laver Hall to the north east. Bake house, brew house and stable. Built in the 19th in yellow stock brick with the original bread oven. Barn. 16th, timber framed and weather boarded. Barn. 17th timber framed and weather boarded. Mill stone outside
White Lodge. This was the rectory originally built in and 1600 included many outbuildings and a moat' – some small parts of which have survived. The house was rebuilt in 1831 but stopped being used as the rectory from 1933 and is now a private house
Olive Spring
Gosling Hall. Timber-framed building from the 15th. It was originally an open hall. Barn from the 16, timber framed and plastered with a thatched roof.
Red House. 16th farmhouse subsequently altered. Timber framed and stock brick,
Red House Cottage
Mill House.Timber framed 18th.
Little Laver Mill. Post Mill built 1579 and in rebuilt in 1797. It was converted to a composite mill in 1850 and stopped working in the 1930s. Demolished in 1963.
Phone box
Coachman’s Cottage.

Saturday, 25 June 2011

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - Little Laver

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
Two tributaries rise in this area and flows south west to join another tributary to the Cripsey Brook which then flows towards the Roding



Post to the west - Matching Green - 53 09
Post to the south - Little Laver - 54 10
 

Little Laver Road

Little Laver Hall. This had been part of a manor, also known as Boucheier, from the 14th. The current house was built in 1845 replacing an earlier house to the house. It was built in brick and stucco with wings were added in 1930.
Cottage, near the hall. This was perhaps a Keeper's cottage It is early 19th in rendered brick and timber framed. It has a verandah on four columns.
Park Woods – behind Little Laver Hall with a circle of trees on the eastern boundary.
Stone Cottages, formerly the parish poorhouse. This was once a late 15th open hall house later altered. It is timber framed and now clad in flint. At the back is a 19th decorative iron pump.
Hull Green farm-house 18th House of plastered brick
Hull Green
Thatched cottage lodge to Little Laver Hall. 19th in painted brick with rustic porch.

Friday, 24 June 2011

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - Matching Green

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
Two Tributaries flows westwards to Cripsey Brook
A tributary rises in this area and flows south to Cripsey Brook


TL 53 11
Post to the west- Matching Green 52 11
Post to the south - High Laver - 53 10
Post to the west -Little Laver - 54 11

Chequers Road

The Chequers. Built in the mid 19th as a stop for coaches
Elm House. Home of Augustus John, the artist 1903-1905 and there is a blue plaque on it. It was later used as a nursing home.
The Lilacs. Timber framed and roughcast 17th cottage, subsequently altered.
Restcot. Timber framed and weather boarded 19th cottage,
Chestnut Cottage. Timber framed and weather boarded 19th cottage, subsequently altered.
Little Watermans. 18th cottage timber framed and plastered. The name relates to the defunct manor of Waterman
Rose Cottage. Cottage built in 1835, timber framed and roughcast

High Laver Lane
Friday Cottage. 17th building, timber framed and weather boarded.
Newhouse Farm. This was previously called ‘Chalkpits; and is a timber-framed 17th house.

Watery Lane
St Edmund. This was built as a chapel of ease in 1874. It is in yellow brick with a small western bell tower. It is used as the hall for the neighbouring school.
Matching Green Church of England Primary School. Built in the early 1900s.
Waterman's End House.
A timber-framed building 18th house
Pit
Leather Bottle. Brick house which was a pub 1890
Clarksmead spring

Little Laver Road
Hull Green Cottages - council houses

Wednesday, 22 June 2011

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - High Laver

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
Two Tributaries flows westwards to Cripsey Brook


TL 52 10
Post to the west - Great Wilmores - 51 10
Post to the south - High Laver - 52 09
Post to the east Watery Lane
Post to the north - Matching Green - 52 11

High Laver Lane
High Laver Grange
High Laver Grange Barns
. These are 17-18th, timber framed and weather boarded. In the doorway of one of them are brackets with carvings of a female figure with cloven hoofs with traces of the original red paint.
Ash Tree - 250 year old pollarded ash, by a stream, south of the Grange

Tilegate Lane
Church Farm. Late 16th farmhouse, later extended and altered. It is Timber framed, plastered with some external frame. It seems to have been built with a brick chimney stack in a 'hall' which was open to the roof and a floor inserted in hall with a winding stair in the 17th.

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - Faggoters Farm

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
A Tributary flows south westwards to Cripsey Brook


TL 52 11
Post to the east -Matching Green - 53 10
Post to the south - High Laver - 52 10
Post to the west - Loyters Green - 51 11

Faggoters Road
Faggoters Farm. Timber framed 17th house subsequently altered.

Otes. The site of Otes manor is east of Faggoters Farm and was part of the manor of Little Laver. The earliest records are from the late 13th when land was held by a John Otes. The medieval manor had been rebuilt as a red brick Tudor mansion, gabled and castellated. In the early 17th it was purchased by members of the William Masham, a Yorkshire born City businessman. Between 1691 and 1704 John Locke the philosopher lived, and died here as a paying guest of Lady Damaris Masham, a ‘blue stocking’. Later Lady Abigail Masham lived here after retiring as a courtier to Queen Anne. A later resident of was Fortunatus Montagu, the black son of Muslim, Edward Wortley Montagu. Later members of the family sold Locke’s books and generally bankrupted the estate. The building was demolished in 182 although some outbuildings remained until 1952. The site is partly moated and a well and some trees remain. The stream here was dammed in the 18th forming a lake

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - Great Wilmores

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
A Tributary flows westwards to Cripsey Brook


TL 51 10
Post to the north - Loyters Green - TL 51 11
post to the east - High Laver - 52 10
post to the south - Magdalen Laver - 51 09

Great Wilmores. This is a 16th farmhouse, later altered. It is timber framed, and clad in yellow stock brick


Mashams. The cottage dates from the mid 14th as a timber-framed hall house. It was divided into two cottages and weatherboarded in the 19th. It now belongs to the charitable Mashams Trust.

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - Loyter's Green

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
A Tributary rises in this area and flows south westwards to Cripsey Brook
A Tributary flows south westwards to Cripsey Brook



TL 51 11
post to the west -Housham - TL50 11
post to the east - Faggoters 52 11
post to the south - Great Wilmores - 51 10


Carters Green

New Way Lane

Faggoters Lane
Loyters Green
Laughter Farm
Whites Farm

Matching Park
This was originally Matching Wood, which was emparked by Thomas de Arderne in 1229 and apples were grown there in 1231.
Moat – this may have been the site of the park keeper's house in 1278.

Tuesday, 21 June 2011

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook - Housham Tye

Thames Tributary - tributary to Cripsey Brook
The Tributary rises in this area and flows westwards to Cripsey Brook


TL east 50 11
post to the east - 51 11 - Loyters Green

Faggoters Lane
Meadcote
Rose Cottage
Manor House

Housham Tye

New Way Lane

Monday, 20 June 2011

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - Moreton

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The Cripsey Brook flows west towards the River Roding and is joined from the north by the Stanford Hall Brook.


TL 52 07
Post to the north - Ashlyns- 52 08
Post to the west 51 07 Weald Bridge
Post to the east - Moreton - 53 07 

Moreton Road
Bovinger Lodge. House from the 17th with later ‘restorations’. It is timber framed with cladding of brick and rubble with patterned plaster. There is an original brick vaulted cellar.
Barn and cart shed at Bovinger Lodge. The 18th barn has 5 bays and is timber framed and weather boarded. The attached cart shed is also weather boarded. There is also a cowshed, 18th timber framed and weather boarded.
Muggins. House built 1600 which is timber framed and rendered. Its earlier name was 'Mogones' recorded in the 1470s.

Pedlars End
House from the 17th timber framed and plastered
White House. This was once two cottages from the mid 18th timber framed and plastered

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook -Bushes

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook
Stanford Hall Brook flows south eastwards towards Cripsey Brook and the River Roding
TL 52037 07369

Countryside area with scattered farms - some of them ancient


Post to the north - High Laver
Post to the west - Magdalen Laver
Post to the south - Moreton
Post to the east - Moreton


Wind Hill
Lunds House. 17th house subsquently altered. It is timber framed and roughcast rendered. Diamond mullion windows suggests that it was originally a dwelling of low status,
White's Farmhouse. This is a lobby-entrance 17th house which is timber framed and plastered. Ashlyns Cottages
Bushes Farm House, This house dates from 1500, but later extended and ‘restored’ in 1933. It is Timber framed, plastered with the frame exposed. In the roof are smoke-blackened medieval rafters making it clear that this was a medieval open hall to the east and the jettied north-south range is a 16th parlour extension. This is a moated site.

Sources
British Listed Buildings. Web site

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook - Magdalen Laver

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook
Stanford Hall Brook flows south eastwards towards Cripsey Brook and the River Roding


TL 51 06
Post to the north 51 08 Magdalen Laver
Post to the east - Ashlyns - 52 06
Post to the south - Weald Bridge 51 05

Ashlyns Lane
Weald Lodge. 18th house subsequently altered, Brick and timber framed and plastered. Previously this was a farm.

Spencers Farm

Weald Bridge Road
Peaceful Kennels - Greyhound Training Track

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook - Magdalen Laver

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook
Stanford Hall Brook flows south eastwards towards Cripsey Brook and the River Roding


TL 51 09

Post to the north - Great Wilmores 51 10
Post to the west - Magdalen Laver - 50 09
Post to the south - Magdalen Laver 51 07
Post to the east - High Laver - 52 09


Magdalen Laver
“Laver” comes from an Old English word meaning 'stream'

Tile Gate Road
St. Mary Magdalen built of flint rubble with some Roman brick and there are also two pudding stone boulders in the north corners of the wall, thought to be markers. There is a timber tower, which was added in 1567, and which is surmounted by a boarded pyramid roof. The church was ‘restored’ in 1856 and in 1912 a pipe organ was bought from Christ Church, Albany Street . There are two bells, one of which is 14th to the honour of St. John. A 15th font, which was in the rectory garden, is now back in the church.
Fish ponds
Tile Gate Farm. This may be 16th but has a later farm-house built in front
Barn with 16th timbers. This is now housing

Pole Lane
This is said to have once been the main street of a medieval village, deserted at the Black Death.
Moated mill mound, covered with trees, plus a modern causeway on the south-east.

Sunday, 19 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook - Magdalen Laver

Thames Tributary River Roding – Stanford Hall Brook tributary to the Cripsey Brook
Stanford Hall Brook flows eastwards towards Cripsey Brook and the River Roding


TL 50 09
post to the west - Wynters Armourie - 49 09
post to the east 51 09 Magdalen Laver

Belsnam Wood

School Lane
Old school. A school was established in 1818 by the the rector William Webb Ellis, who, whilst at Rugby school, picked up the ball during a football game and ran with it, thereby establishing the game of Rugby Football. The school continued in associated with the church until 1846-7. In 1862 a school was built on land given by Anna Maria Meyer with the rector and churchwarden as managers. There was also a teacher’s house. In 1902 it passed to the Essex Education Committee and was closed in 1960. The building is now housing
Melanese Cottages. timber framed and could be 17th

Tile Gate Road
The Old Rectory. This was a new rectory built in 1850. It is red brick and was occupied by the rector until 1950.
Hall Farm Lodge


Thames Tributary – tributary to Cripsey Brook - Wynters

Thames Tributary – tributary to Cripsey Brook
The tributary rises in this area and flows west towards the Cripsey Brook and the River Roding


TL 49 09
post to the east - Magdalen Laver
Post to the west Hastingwood Road


Hastingwood Road
Wynters Armorie. The name derives from a mid-13th family. It was originally known as Winters but has been renamed because of a story that it was used as an arsenal for Commonwealth soldiers. This is a 13th hall house, with the timbers are blackened with smoke from an open hearth. It was later altered and, then 'restored' in the 1930s. It timber framed and plastered and of an unusual construction. Mummified cats have been found on site.
Moated site the moat is on the east, north & west sides. In the grounds are walnut and meddler. There is a sundial memorial in the lawn.

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - Weald Bridge

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The Brook continues to flow eastwards to the River Roding and is joined by a tributary from the south


TL 51 07
Post to the north - Ashlyns - TL 51 08
Post to the west - Kent's Lane
Post to the east -Moreton 52 07
Post to the south - Reynkyns Wood - 51 06

Ashlyns Lane
Bowlers Green. Small hamlet and site of substantial medieval buildings
Ashlyns Farm Moat which is the site of the former Manor of Ashlyns. The manor is first recorded in the 14th. From 1672 it belonged to the Royal College of Physicians to pay for staff at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, St. Thomas's Hospital, and Christ’s College. In 1922 the college sold it. The current far house may be 17th. Since 1970 it has been in the same family and was the earliest organic farm in Essex.
Leyden’s Cottage. 17th house, timber framed and plastered with a weather boarded dado and thatched roof.

Weald Bridge Road
Weald Bridge. This crosses the Cripsey Brook on the road from Epping. Between 1556 and 1652 responsibility for it was unclear. It was a county bridge from about 1800.
Weald Bridge Farm. Site of substantial medieval buildings
Cutlers Green

Saturday, 18 June 2011

Thames tributary – tributary to the Cripsey Brook

Thames tributary – tributary to the Cripsey Brook
a stream flows north towards the brook


TL 51 06
Post to the north - Weald Bridge - TL 51 07
Post to the south - North Weald - 51 05

Reynkyns Wood


Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The Cripsey brook flows north west towards the River Roding


Post to the east Weald Bridge
Post to the west Canes Wood


Kent’s Lane
Kent’s Farm
Reservoirs

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The brook flows north east towards the River Roding. It is joined by Shonks Brook from the north and another tributary from the south and another from the North West.

TL 49176 06676

Countryside and woodland area on the outskirts of Harlow

Post to the east Kents Lane
Post to the south Vicarage Lane
Post to the north Hastingwood Road

Canes Wood

Sources

Thames Tributary Shonks Brook - Hastingwood Road

Thames Tributary Shonks Brook
The Brook flows south east towards the Cripsey Brook and the River Roding


Post to the north Wynters Armorie
Post to the west Hastingwood

Hastingwood Road
Rolls Farm. Timber framed 17th house with later alterations. Timber framed
Sewards Hall Farm. Mentioned in Domesday, this is a 15th manor house on a moated site plus a smaller 16th house. There was some fire damage in 1885. It was originally a hall house with the other house corner to corner with it, for separate households. Inside is a bread oven with a cast iron door, an early wooden and lead lined water tank, and a pump in working order with a stone sink. Outside is a privy with 'Manor Closet', with a wooden seat with a wooden lid, and a lower seat for child. Up to 1977 this was a dairy farm with Friesian/Canadian Holstein cows.
Willow Place and Hastingwood Business Centre
Wynters cottage. Late 16th house with later extensions. Timber framed, and plastered with exposed framing.
Wynters Farm

Friday, 17 June 2011

Thames Tributary Shonks Brook - Hastingwood

Thames Tributary Shonks Brook
The Brook flows north east and then turns south east towards the Cripsey Brook and the River Roding


TL 48  06
post to the west - 47 06 Latton Park
post to the east - 49 06 - Hastingwood Road

Glovers Lane
Glovers Farm. 18th Farmhouse, timber framed and weather boarded
Barn. Building from 1600, timber framed and weather boarded with some original wattle and daub infill in the north east wall.
The Woodings, 17th Cottage, timber framed and plastered
Hastingwood Village Hall
Hastingwood Road
The name of Hastingwood comes from that of Humphrey de Hastings who held the manor before 1280.
Wyntersbrook. 18th House, timber framed and plastered,
Church. This was built in 1864 as a chapel of ease for St.Andrew, North Weald . It is a simple red brick building with a single nave and a small bell tower. Inside was a memorial window to John Stallibrass of Paris Hall and his wife. It is now private housing
Church Farm
Hastingwood House. This was built 1840 and is a brick house standing in its own grounds.
Redwoods – nine trees in the area of Hastingwood Farm . There are also three Wellingtonia in the same area.
Hastingwood Farm. The site is mentioned in Domesday. The farm house was a 17th timber framed building known locally as Rainbow Farm, after the name of its owner. It was used by coaches plying between Cambridge and London for stabling and because they provided custom for drinks an inn developed here, to be called ‘The Rainbow’. The farmhouse was demolished in 1954.
The Rainbow and Dove pub. This was originally a 17th house part of the farm complex. It is Timber framed with roughcast render . It was called 'The Rainbow' after the farm name and a topiary bird in the grounds added the name of the dove
The pub barn was used as a dance hall in the 1940s.
Paris Hall. This was the house for the local manor with the name taken from the Paris family, landholders here in the 13th - Roger de Paris is mentioned in 1280. Passing through many owners it was acquired by another Parris family in 1947. It is a moated manor house for the areas which was rebuilt 1600. The current house is 16th with later alterations. It is timber framed and plastered. There is a stair tower and beyond it a garderobe extension and beyond that a bake house/brew house. The two remaining arms of the rectangular moat have now been redesigned as a water feature.
Granary at Paris Hall Farmhouse. This is early 19th, timber framed, weather boarded, and mounted on brick piers.

Mill Street
Shonks. This is named from a family called Shanks of whom there is a record in 1438.

Thames Tributary Shonks Brook - Latton Park

Thames Tributary Shonks Brook
Shonks Brook rises in this area and flows eastwards to Cripey Brook and the Roding


A recently rural area bisected by two major roads with a major intersection between them

TL 47 08
Post to the east - 48 08 - Hastingwood
Post to the south - 47 07 Randells

Hastingwood
St Clare’s Hospice. Set up as a result of community initiatives in the late 1980s.

Latton Park
Ancient woodland still with its boundary earth bank and ditch system. It has however been partly replanted with Norway spruce plus some Scots Pine. In the north there is still Pedunculate Oak with coppiced Hornbeam. There are also glades and ponds

M11
Junction 7

London Road
Also called Potter Street by pass, this is a stretch of the old A11.
Pottery site. In the 16th this was to the west of the road. The earliest mention of a potter here is in 1254.
Harlow Park. This is the last remains of the Abbot of Waltham’s hunting grounds 1041-1539 and was the chief wood in the demesne. This is ancient woodland but has been partly replanted with Norway spruce
C.J. Pryor depot. Pryor are a large specialist earth moving company founded in 1947 and based in Harlow.

Rundell’s Grove
The name refers to a John Roundell who bought land here in 1403. This includes several non-ancient woodland types. It is mostly spruce plantation, but there is some broad-leaved woodland with large, mature Oak plus with Hazel and Field Maple with Brambles.

Thursday, 16 June 2011

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - North Weald Bassett

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The Brook flows eastwards towards the River Roding
A Tributary stream flows north towards the Cripsey Brook


Post to the west Delved Bridge, North Weald
post to the north 49 07 Canes Wood

A414 by pass
Recently built road which by passes North Weald.

Merlin Way

North Weald Airfield
Main runway – only the northern section on this square. The airfield has a 1920 m (6300 ft) main runway. At the beginning of the Second World War it had two paved runways, each 50' wide. The north-south runway was 2800 feet long and
The airfield was built in 1916 as an RAF night landing ground and used in the First World War for home defence and then was unused until rebuilt in 1926.  Ad Astra House was built in 1908 and requisitioned as Station HQ in 1916.  It was later used during the Battle of Britain for 11 group equipped with Hawker Hurricanes, but eventually over 20 squadrons of fighter aircraft were stationed there. After the war the main runway was extended twice to cater for jet aircraft and in 1952 a new contol tower was built but in 1958 it was used only by the Essex Gliding Club. It was sold to Epping Forest District Council in 1979. Surviving buildings include the control tower, and the operations block upgraded as a nuclear bunker.

Rayley Lane
North Weald Golf Club. Opened in 1966
Little Weald Hall. This used to be called New Hall, and is a timber-framed 17th building.

Vicarage Lane
North Weald Burial Ground. Children’s Garden with statues. Garden of Remembrance. Many war graves from the Second World War particularly from North Weald Bassett Aerodrome, by the R.A.F. Station at Stapleford Tawney, and also to the Essex Regiment.
War Memorial
St. Andrew’s Church. The church dates from 1330 and was built on the site of an earlier church and was attached to the nunnery at Clerkenwell. Built of flints and Roman brick. The high brick tower was built in 1500 with battlements and there are six bells. On the south wall is a sundial from 1706. Following a fire in 1964 some items were removed from the church and medieval wall paintings were discovered. The lychgate was dedicated in 1912.
Vicarage. A vicarage existed in the 17th century but the current building is 19th in brick and roughcast
Church Cottage. This used to be called The Old School House. This is a 17th Cottage, timber framed, and plastered with weatherboarding and brick cladding. A school was endowed here by Simon Thorogood, fishmonger, of London in 1635, and used the 19th, when it became the schoolmaster's house.
Church Hall – this is the church school built in 1842 on the site of another cottage
St. Clements. This is a 17th house, timber framed, and part weather boarded,
White friars. 19th brick house.
Chase farm. Now business units
Art Nursery garden centre

Monday, 13 June 2011

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook - North Weald

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook
The Cripsey Brook continues to flow eastwards towards the Roding, and is joined by a tributary from the north.


Post to the west Thornwood
Post to the east Vicarage Lane


Delved Bridge

Weald Hall Lane
Motocross
Weald Hall – now a care home
Weald Hall Lane is cut off at its eastern end by Gate G and the northern end of a runway for North Weald airfield.

Thames Tributary Roding – Randells

Thames Tributary Roding – Tributary to the Cripsey Brook
A stream rises in this area and flows south towards the Cripsey Brook, itself a tributary of the River Roding


An ex-urban area through which two main roads run

TL 47 07
Post to the north Latton Park
Post to the south Thornwood


Canes Lane

Harlow Garden Centre. The centre has been here since 1976 by a family involved in market gardening since the 1930's. It was originally started as a nursery, growing for the London flower markets.
Canes Cottages

London Road
The old A11 road
Rundells. 18th house in red brick plus extensions.
The Herb Farm and Seed Mill
Horseshoes Farm. 17th house Timber framed, and plastered. Pargetting in
panels plus ‘AD 1612’ on that wall. Site of the Bull and Horseshoes which was there in 1755 and closed in the 1850s
The Oaks
Horseshoes Farm West.
MacDonald’s in old pub. The pub also said to be the Bull and Horseshoes

M11
This section of the motorway is slightly to the south of junction 7 and includes some of the southern slip roads to it. This section was built by Dowsett Engineering Construction Ltd of Harrogate, in 1977. Unsurfaced concrete was used.

Sunday, 12 June 2011

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook, - Thornwood

Thames Tributary Cripsey Brook,
The Cripsey Brook is a tributary to the Roding. It rises in this area in two branches and flows eastwards to the Roding.


TL 47 06

post to the north - 47 07 -Randells
Post to the east Delved Bridge - North Weald



 M11
This section of the motorway is slightly to the south of junction 7. The section from Junction 4 to 7 was built by Dowsett Engineering Construction Ltd of Harrogate, Yorkshire in 1977. Unsurfaced concrete was used to just south of this stretch

High Road
High Elms

Thames Tributary River Roding - Hallsford

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is met by a tributary from the east


Post to the north High Ongar
Post to the east Stondon Massey
Post to the west Ongar
Post to the south Great Myles

Mill Lane
Essex County Council Tip
Hanson Waste Services Tip

Hallsford brickworks.

Ongar Road
Mechtest. Engineering works opened 1952 to repair agricultural machinery.
ABC Nursery and Pre SchoolHallsford Farm House. This used to be Bridge Farm on lower ground and dating from 16th. Rebuilt in the 1880s.

Stondon Road
Hallsford Bridge, the crossing here is late 18th, before which it was a ford. The present bridge was built by Essex County Council in 1934.
Hallsford Bridge Meadow. The site was Ongar sewage treatment works built in the late 1890s and in use until 1932. It was then returned to grassland and rough grazing. It is now regarded as an area of nature interest. The grassland has occasional Cowslips, and can a small number of Bee Orchids. Because it is near the Roding there are lots of damselflies. There is a big pendunculate oak in the hedgerow

Thames Tributary Roding - High Ongar

Thames Tributary Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is met by a tributary from the east.


Post to the north High Ongar Bridge
Post to the east Chelmsford Road
Post to the west Ongar
Post to the south Hallsford


Chelmsford Road
Mulberry House. House in red brick with 3 storeys and cellars and a service wing - which is said to have been built first to house construction worker and which incorporates remains of the earlier house. It was built in 1767 for Edward Earle. In 1788 Earle, and his successors, became the rectors and the house thus became the rectory and remained so until 1975 when it was sold and renovated by new private owners. It was later used as a training centre by the Trustee Savings Bank. Later it was converted into a pub...
Site of earlier house on the garden lawns in an area once used as tennis courts also part of the service wing.
Rectory Cottage- once used as the local youth club
7/6 Mulberry Cottages. Old coach house and servants' quarters. 18th red brick with weatherboarding
Pastoral centre. A Christian centre remains in the grounds
Grounds – there is a Wellingtonia fir, planted to celebrate the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, and a mulberry bush
Lake is made up of the remains of a Tudor moat

Mill Lane
Took its name from a windmill
Council houses south of the village.
Clatterford Bridge spans the tributary stream flowing west to the Roding
Village Hall. A village hall was opened in 1925 with an endowment of Mill Lane allotment field which was sold in the early 1930s. A new hall was opened in 2008 on the site of Brace & Sons saw mill. On the site was found three prehistoric features, a medieval ditch and two post-medieval features
Windmill. Known to have been in use 1777- 1874 but may be older. Its base now converted to housing is in the garden of Mill Cottage. It is octagonal shape and has thick red brick walls..
Mill Cottage, which included a bakery which was part of the mill and which continued after it had closed.

Millfields
Council housing with 40 and 8 old people's bungalows. Built 1948.

The Street
1, 2, 3 Blacksmiths Cottages. 17th with subsequent alterations, Timber
framed and plastered
Marsala Zone - Red Lion Public House. 17th building which may include remains of an earlier structure. Timber framed and plastered. Became an Indian restaurant
Old Cottage. 17th timber framed and plastered
Thai restaurant. This was the Three Horseshoes Inn and has had its timber framing exposed. It is a 17th house, timber framed and plastered
House and old Post Office. 15th hall house with crosswings which may have been the rectory. Timber framed and weather boarded it may originally have had 14 rooms and was later divided into four cottages. One wing is said to have been the 18th village lock-up. A small shop was added in the 19th used as the Post Office
Tabor Almshouses. These resulted from an early 17th charity and were closed and demolished in the 1930s.
High Ongar Primary School. School House. Built 1867 in red brick. It included the schoolteacher’s house
St.Mary’s Church. Originally this is 12th with many extensions, particularly from 19th. It is built of flint rubble, with limestone and clunch dressings. There is a tower in brick added in 1858. Inside is a Brass from 1510. In the east window is mid 16th stained with the arms of Jane Seymour and Henry VIII. There is an 18th family pew.
War memorial in the churchyard, on the Street
Forester's Arms, Public House. 18th in painted brick
Nash Hall. Farm with business units and a craft centre. 17th farmhouse, timber framed and plastered. This was a local manor house known also as Ashall and is in Domesday, eventually becoming part of the Forest Hall Estate.
Nash Hall Cottages with mansard roofs and gabled dormers.

Westlands Spring
An ancient linear wood with ash and hornbeam. Local nature reserve.

Saturday, 11 June 2011

Thames Tributary Roding- Tributary Stream to the Roding - Crownlands

Thames Tributary Roding- Tributary Stream to the Roding
The Tributary stream flows south west towards the Roding

TL 57798 03725

Rural area along the main road from Ongar to Chelmsford


Post to the north Forest Hall
Post to the east Chelmsford Road
Post to the west High Ongar
Post to the south Stondon Massey

Chelmsford Road
Leys Farm
Crownland Farmhouse. 16th Timber framed and plastered house.
Crownlands Cottages

Thistlelands Spring – local woodland nature reserve with oak, hornbeam and ash

Sources
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames Tributary River Roding – tributary stream to the Roding - Forest Hall

Thames Tributary River Roding – tributary stream to the Roding
The tributary flows south westwards to the Roding


Post to the north Cannons Lane
Post to the east Norton Mandeville
Post to the west High Ongar Bridge
Post to the south Crownlands

Norton Lane
Norton Hall. This was owned by Merton College, Oxford until the mid 19th when it became part of the Forest Hall Estate. The farmhouse is 19th red brick.
Norton Hall Farm buildings. 19th building in red brick round a square courtyard.
New Plantation
Forest Hall. This is an old manorial site which was given to the St. Paul's after the conquest and was called Norton or Norton Foliot. It was the central part of a large estate consisting of other manors and farms. By the mid 16th it was owned by the Stane family and was sold by them in the mid 19th. Forest Hall House was owned from 1924 by H. M. McCorquodale, father in law to Barbara Cartland, and sold to the Air Ministry in the Second World War who used in connection with the airfield which was adjacent to it in the north. They in turn sold it to Essex County Council. The house was built by Richard Stane in 1700 and replaced in 1845 by Revd. Stane. In the late 19th it employed some 50 indoor and outdoor servants, and had its own gasworks and sawmill. Demolished in 1957 and there is now housing on site. Only the garden walls survive
Furze Woods
Gas House Plantation
Icehouse Plantation

Friday, 10 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding – tributary stream to the Roding - Norton Mandeville

Thames Tributary River Roding – tributary stream to the Roding
The tributary stream flows west to the Roding and is joined by smaller tributaries from the south and from the north.


Post to the east Forest Hall
Post to the east Norton Mandeville
Post to the south High Ongar

Norton Mandeville
The name indicates a connection to Geoffrey De Mandeville one of William the Conqueror henchmen and an ancestor of the Earls of Essex.

Norton Lane
This was once called the Causeway
, and is mentioned in documents from 1260. Great Causeway field and Little Causeway field lay to the sout5h of it.
All Saints church. The church is lit by oil lamps and candles, there is an hour glass to time the sermons, and there is a set of royal arms. The weather boarded belfry is late 14th. The church itself is 14th built of flint rubble but there are some remains from the 12th. It probably dares from about 1190 that Galiena de Dammartin and was connected to the Priory of St. Leonard's at Bromley, Middlesex. It also had links to the nunnery at Stratford – but on the whole was too small to bother with. The church was restored in 1903 and the porch built. It was bombed in 1944
Churchyard. There is a Millennium yew tree planted in 2000. It is a nature reserve but is used by local pea-cocks.

Thursday, 9 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding – tributary to the Roding - Norton Mandeville

Thames Tributary River Roding – tributary to the Roding
The tributary rises in this area and flows westwards to the Roding


Post to the north Norton Heath Road
Post to the west Norton Mandeville
Post to the south Norton Heath

Chemsford Road
Dovefields Farm
The grass verge in front of the farm has a nature conservation importance

Norton Lane
Dodds Farm
Dodds Farm Kennels

Thames Tributary Roding –tributary stream - High Ongar

Thames Tributary Roding –tributary stream
The Tributary stream flows north west towards the Roding


Post to the north Norton Mandeville
Post to the east Norton Heath
Post to the west Crownlands

Chelmsford Road
Chevers Hall. This was once Chivers Hall and was also called Passfield Chivers and was a manor. It is a 17th house, timber-framed and plastered. Records of ownership go back to the mid 14th and by the 16th was held by the Pawne family but was later sold. This has now been converted to housing along with barns and farm buildings
Chevers Hall Cottages

King Street
Paslow Hall. 16th house which includes earlier parts and with an 18th brick fa├žade. Timber framed and plastered and the south front faced with red brick. The south wing is probably the area of the old great hall rebuilt in the 18th century. Records of manorial courts here go back to the mid-13th and it was also known as Pasfield. It is mentioned in a deed if Edward the Confessor when it was passed to Waltham Abbey with whom it remained until the dissolution. It was then passed through a number of the nobility and eventually became part of the Forest Hall Estate centered on Blake Hall and was left to tenant farmers. In 1904 Hugh Craig, a tenant here made Cheddar cheeses, using 160 gallons of milk. After the First World War it was bought as a dairy farm by the Stratford Co-operative Society who used it as the central part of their local network of properties. It is now in use by a series of industrial units.
Granary at Paslow Hall. 17th building timber framed and weather boarded,
Stable at Paslow Hall. 18th timber framed and weather boarded
Cart Lodge at Paslow Hall. 16th building timber framed and weather boarded
Old Withers Farm, 17th house Timber framed and plastered. This is an ancient moated site – since filled in. the name comes from a 14th owner, Richard Wyther
Stable at Old Wythers Farm. 19, timber framed and weather boarded,
King Street Farm. Farmhouse 1600, timber framed and pebble dashed. It is older than the farm itself. The farm was ‘Improved’ and rebuilt in the late 19th.
Barn and byre at King Street Farm. 19th red brick. There is a white cross on the gable of the byre. There is also a wagon lodge and other buildings grouped around a courtyard.

Thames Tributary River Roding - Tributary stream - Norton Heath

Thames Tributary River Roding - Tributary stream
The Tributary flows north towards the Roding.


Post to the north Norton Mandeville
Post to the west High Ongar

Chelmsford Road
Cozens Farm. At Cozens Farm. Partly moated House from the 17th, timber framed and plastered
Spurriers. 17th timber framed farmhouse with red brick facade.
Malthouse – 19th timber building. Now The Maltings garden reclamation

King Street
The Wheatsheaf
Rookery Road
Blewgates farm. 18th front to 16th house which is timber framed and plastered
Cottage.18th timber framed and weatherboarded,
Rookery Farm. Now 2 dwellings. 15th hall house, Timber framed and plastered. An old moated site.

Thames Tributary River Roding - High Ongar

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow southwards and is joined by a tributary from the west.


TL 56 05
Post to the north - Heron's Farm - 56 06
Post to the west Ongar
Post to the east Forest Hall
Post to the south High Ongar


Clark’s Spring
Veteran oak tree nearby

High Ongar Road
High Ongar Bridge. Concrete bridge built by Essex County Council 1913. It used to carry the main Chelmsford road across the Roding. In 1858 it was then a brick bridge.

Thames Tributary River Roding – Tributary stream - Ongar

Thames Tributary River Roding – Tributary stream
The stream flows south east towards the Roding


Post to the north Shelley
Post to the west Shelley
Post to the east High Ongar
Post to the south Ongar

Church Lane
1 -3 16th cottages on the corner of Ongar Road. They are timber framed and plastered with brick fronts and some weather boarding

Fyfield Road
Smiths Brasserie. This was the Red Cow also named “The Bowling Inn”. There was a bowling green and bowling club behind it.
Ongar Leisure Centre. This is the secondary school’s sports centre and swimming pool, built in the 1970s which continues in general use.
Ongar War Memorial Hospital. Now demolished. In 1918 following a public meeting it was decided to build a cottage hospital as a memorial to those lost in the Great War and it opened in 1932 with 24 beds. It was greatly enlarged in the Second World War and in 1948 joined the NHS with 25 beds. It was however too small to undertake a wide range of work and access was often difficult. There were no out-patients and the Physiotherapy Department was in an old air-raid shelter. In 1969 it as proposed to close it - the maternity unit had closed and X-rays could not be done. In 1974 it had 23 beds, in 1992 it had 22, and by 2001 it had 14. In 2003 it was refurbished, re-opened and dedicated to the people of Ongar but it closed in 2008, with a final Remembrance Day service. It is to be replaced by an Ongar War Memorial Medical Centre which will incorporate the war memorial.
Clock and Barometer Store

Road off Fyfield Road
Boarded Barns Farm. This was also once called New Barns. The farmhouse is l7th Timber framed and plastered. A Bill for groceries dated 1634 was found in the roof and is framed in the Hall. The farm adjoins the Rhone-Poulenc Agriculture, previously May and Baker, site and they have managed it. Since 1989, part of the farm has been managed as an organic arable unit for a long term comparison between organic farm and conventional farm management. This also includes Integrated Crop Management.
Roman buildings – two found near the site
Ostlery, Granary & Kennels at Boarded Barns Farm. The Granary. Stable and Grooms room, 16th single storey, and l8th dog kennels. They are timber framed and weather boarded.
Cattle Yard including Stables, Barn, and Stallion Shed. 18th timber framed and weather boarded. The Stallion Stables have original doors, partitions and feeding troughs
Stable block.18th Timber framed and weather boarded. Used as Laboratories in Research Centre
Fyfield Business Centre was Ongar Research Station for May and Baker Horticultural Research from 1952. Later taken over by Rhone Poulenc.

The Gables
Housing built on the site of Ongar County Secondary School. The School was built by Essex Education Committee in 1936 for 520 children. It had neo-Georgian buildings fronting Fyfield Road. It became a comprehensive in the 1960s but was closed in 1989.

Wednesday, 8 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - tributary stream - Shelley

Thames Tributary River Roding
A tributary stream flows south to the Roding


TL 55 06
Post to the north- Fyfield - 55 07
Post to the west - Shelley Common - 54 06
Post to the east - Herons Farm - 56-06
Post to the south - Ongar - 55 05

Church Lane
Shelley is an old manor mentioned in Domesday.
St.Peter. Built in 1888 by Habershon and Fawkner. The medieval parish church was in ruins and unsafe by 1800. The current church is the third on the site and built from money raised by subscriptions. It is in of Red brick with some flint. Inside is a painting "The Madonna di Foligno" and monuments to the Greene family who lived here from the late 16th to the 18th.
Shelley Hall. This was originally an early l4th hall house which was timber framed with gault brick cladding. Inside is the original heavily sooted l4th roof structure. It was altered and enlarged, by John Greene – this is dated as 1587 on lintel – he had a large family. In the roof is a room with 8 painted panels - one shows a cock and there are also some flowers. Also inside are a 16th carved oak chimney piece, an 18th staircase, doors, and some original shutters.
Cart lodge with Dovecote. This is 18th timber framed and weather boarded. At the top is a weather boarded 3 hole dovecote with a nesting area

Ongar Road
Bundish is a manorial name probably named for the family of John de Burndish who was connected to Moreton manor in the 14th. It was described as a manor in the 1770s but later as a farm. The house itself is in the parish of Moreton with the parish boundary runs along the west wall of the house, so the outbuildings are in Shelley. This is a moated site – the moat has been recently renovated and allegedly the ‘bung’ found. It has all now been done up for new housing.
Bundish Hall. 15th house with later alterations. This was a medieval manor house and includes the late-15th solar wing. It is Part timber framed part brick and plastered. In the early 19th it was the house was reduced in size, and partly cased in brick so it appears to be a small 19th farm-house. There was some Second World War bomb damage,
Barn at Bundish Hall. 16th Timber framed and weather boarded barn. Now done up for housing. Cart lodge at Bundish Hall Farm. 18th Timber framed and weather boarded and now also done up for housing.
Granary at Bundish Hall Farm. 18th Timber framed and weather boarded. Housing too.
Folyats. House built 1914 by J. W. Newall with a view over the Forest Hall, which is what he wanted

Thames Tributary Roding – Tributary Stream - Pennyfeathers

Thames Tributary Roding – Tributary Stream
A tributary stream flows south towards the Roding


TL 55 07
Link to the north Embleys Farm - 55 08
Post to the west - Moreton - 54 07
Post to the south Shelley - 55 06
Post to the east - Fyfield - 56 07

Moreton Road
Pennyfeathers Farm. 16th house. Timber framed and plastered on a moated site.
Barn at Pennyfeathers. 17th timber framed and weather boarded
Cart Lodge at Pennyfeathers 18th timber framed,
St.Dunstans Farm

Cross Lane
Harriets Farm, 17th timber framed and plastered house
Moat
Crosslees Farm. Timber framed and brick clad, house 1600.Inside is some 1600 decorative painting.

Thames Tributary River Roding - Herons

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south east towards the Thames


TL 56 06
Post to the north Fyfield - 56 07
Post to the south 56 05 High Ongar
Post to the west -Shelley - 55 06
Post to the east Cannons Lane 57 06


Heron’s Lane
Heron’s Farm. 18th farmhouse in painted brick on Moated site.
Barn. 16th Timber framed and weatherboarded,
Barn. 16th. Timber framed and weatherboarded
Bakehouse and Brewhouse. 18th in painted brick

Thames Tributary River Roding - Cannons Lane

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south towards the Thames

A small tributary joins it from the west
TL 57350 06455

Rural area with scattered farms and cottages and the remains of an airfield

Post to the south - Forest Hall 
Post to the west Herons 
post to the north Fylfield

Cannons Lane
Ford
Airstrip and hangar. These are remains of the Second World War Willingale Airfield, but still in use for light aircraft.
Essex Shooting Grounds. Clay Pigeon Shoot
Little Forest Hall, 16th House with 19th additions Timber framed and plastered
Little Forest Hall cottages.
The Rookery


Sources
Airfields of Britain. Web site
Essex County Council. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames Tributary River Roding - Fyfield

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is joined by a tributary from the north west


TL 57 07
Post to the west -Fyfield - 56 07
Post to the south Cannons Lane 57 06
Post to the north - Fyfield - 57 08


Cannons Lane
Rowan Cottage 16th house Timber framed and plastered with some flint and red brick
Walker's Cottage. 16th house timber framed with thatched roof.
Cannons Green – a separate more isolated hamlet

Dunmow Road
Ashwell's Cottages. A 16th house timber framed and plastered
Bridge House. 14th open hall house timber framed and plastered
Yew Tree House. 16th house Timber framed and plastered

Ongar Road
Mill Hatch. 17th cottage, timber framed and plastered

Queen Street
Queen’s Head Pub. 17th timber framed and weather boarded building.
1-2 this was originally one house. Late 17th timber framed and plastered.
Brewetts. 16th House and shop timber framed and plastered
Lesser Brewetts. 16th house, timber framed and weather boarded
School House. 19th timber framed and Part weather boarded.
The Mill House. Water mill built 1784, timber framed and weather boarded. Some machinery remains inside - an 1890 Armfield turbine. In full working order with 2 pairs of millstones.

Walker Avenue
Dr Walker's Church of England Voluntary Controlled Primary School. In 1687 Dr. Anthony Walker, who was Rector of Fyfield, gave land and a house for a free school for poor children. In 1807 it had 15 pupils. In 1819 a new schoolroom was built but until the Education Act of 1870 there was little change. In 1875 a new school was built near the site and 1952 there were three teachers and 89 children. It has since been rebuilt in Walker’s Avenue.

Willingale Road
Fyfield Grange – new development on farmland around Fyfield Hall. Including development of barns.
St.Nicholas. The parish church, which has some Roman brick, was built originally in the 12th and had many subsequent alterations. It is in flint rubble and late 18th brick. The 12th tower was in two stages, with the top rebuilt in the 17th and it has weather boarded lantern and octagonal spire. Under the organ is said to be the grave of Lord Scrope, executed by Henry V in 1415.
Fyfield Hall, Posh 13th house with additions from subsequent centuries which claims to be the oldest inhabited timber framed building in England.. Timber framed and plastered. The original aisled hall is perhaps from 1140 with a 13th roof. Timbers in the roof are heavily blackened with smoke from an open hearth. In the 16th there was some rebuilding and an upper storey was introduced and there have been many additions since..
Catholic Pond – a fish pond in the garden of Fyfield Hall
Fyfield Hall farm in 1842 was made up of 288 acres and owned by the Wellesley family who held the manor. Soon after the farm separated from the manor and was owned by the White family from the First World War. It has since been sold for development.
Dovecote at Fyfield Hall. 16th timber framed and weather boarded, building. Being converted to workshop
The Parsonage House. 16th house with later extensions. Timber framed and plastered. Moated site.
Glebe Cottage. 16th house Timber framed and plastered. Became the Parson's house in 1546.

Tuesday, 7 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding. Tributary from the west - Clatterford End

Thames Tributary River Roding. Tributary from the west
A tributary to the Roding flows westwards

TL 56707 06776

Countryside and houses on the edge of Fyfield - some on the site of an inner city children's home.

Post to the north -Lampetts
Post to the west - Pennyfeathers
Post to the east - Fyfield
Post to the south Herons Farm


Clatterford End.
A hamlet between Fyfield and the West Ham School –partly on Ongar Road.

Houchin Drive
Fyfield Village Hall

Ongar Road
Clatterford House. 19th house Rendered brick and timber frame
Clatterford Hall was a brick 18th house now replaced with modern house. Veteran horse chestnut tree alongside
Ivy Cottages Pair of cottages. Late 16 Timber framed and weather boarded,
with thatched roofs.
Elmbridge Hall. Housing in what was West Ham County Borough Council Residential Open Air School built as a truant and industrial school with a military type regime. It was used for ‘delicate’ children from 1925. It was closed and sold to Essex County Council in 1956. It became Fyfield Boarding School in 1958. Converted to posh housing in 2001.

Sources
Children's Homes. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex
Victoria County History. West Ham

Monday, 6 June 2011

Thames Tributary River Roding - Lampetts

Thames Tributary River Roding
A tributary stream flows south and is joined three times by streams flowing from the west.
Lampetts


TL 56 08
Post to the north - Norwood End- 56 09
Post to the south - Fyfield - 56 07
Post to the east - Fyfield - 57 08
Post to the west - Embley's Farm 55 07

Lampetts. This is a manorial name which probably comes from the Lampet family who owned it in the late 15th. It had earlier been one of Lord Scrope’s possessions. The manor house is a moated timber-framed house which was originally an aisled hall. This was a farmhouse and is now an expensive private house

Barn at Lampetts. Early 17th timber framed and weather boarded


http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2011/06/thames-tributary-river-roding-fyfield.html

Thames Tributary River Roding - Embleys

Thames Tributary River Roding - Embleys

Countryside area with scattered farms

Post to the south - Fyfield
Post to the east Lampetts

Thames Tributary River Roding
A tributary stream flowing west joins a stream flowing south towards the Roding

Another tributary stream flows west to join the stream flowing south towards the Roding

Fyfield Road
Embleys Farmhouse. Late 16th timber framed
Barn at Embleys Farm. 17th timber framed and weatherboarded

Sources
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex

Thames Tributary River Roding - Fyfield

Thames Tributary River Roding
The Roding flows south west and is joined by a tributary from the north west


TL 57 08
Post to the west - Lampetts - 56 08
Post to the north - Butt Hatch Farm - 57 09
post to the east Miller's Green-58 08
Post to the south - Fyfield - 57 07

Dunmow Road
Ernest Doe Power. Showroom and workshops of Ernest Doe & Son, tractor repairers. In 1898, Ernest Doe had a blacksmith business in the Maldon area and within ten years the firm had expanded into farming. Further expansion resulted from the purchase of army surplus tractors after the First World War and also became an agent for Fordson, and later for Ransomes. The Fyfield works opened in 1943 following more wartime expansion. The firm remains in family hands.
Brickyards Late 16th house timber framed. Perhaps originally built as brickmaster's house.
Black Bull. Public House and hotel. Early 15th timber framed building with some weatherboarding and extensions throughout the centuries.
Pickerells farm was formerly known as Ash's Farm and was also owned by Lord Dacre. It is late 17th.
Little Forge. 17th house timber framed
Pickerells. The site of a big house, called Pickerells. In the 18th this belonged to the Brand family and became the property of Lord Dacre and had been demolished by 1835. Its foundations have been found on site.
Dacres Gate – amazing chimneys on the lodge, the rest is a new development of pastiche 18th houses.
Clarke's Farmhouse. 16th timber framed house

Sunday, 5 June 2011

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to the River Roding - Norwood End

http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2011/05/thames-tributary-tributary-stream-to_491.html

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to the River Roding
The stream flows south towards the Roding

Another tributary stream flows south towards the Roding

TL 56 09
Post to the north Beauchamp Roding 56 10
Post to the east Beauchamp Roding - 57 09
Post to the south - Lampetts - 56 08

Norwood End

This area was once the main part of Fyfield but since the late 18th the population has become concentrated to the south in the present village area while this has become depopulated.
Claydon’s Green
Norwood End House. Thuis had a moat enclosing on two recaungular sites. There is a a local tradition that Henry, Lord Scrope, local landowner, had a magnificent house here in the early 15th – although there is no evidence for this.
The Nook, was a small timber-framed building from the early 19th with the appearance of a school or nonconformist chapel , It is reputed to have been a 'nonconformist academy'. It is now a house and has been rebuilt
Dame Anna's Farm. This is moated site and it is a timber-framed medieval house. It was originally an open hall with a screens passage across the end
Green’s Farm. This is a moated site and is late 17th
Malting Farm. Early 17th.


http://edithsstreets.blogspot.com/2011/05/thames-tributary-tributary-to-river.html

Friday, 3 June 2011

Thames Tributary Roding - Miller's Green

Thames Tributary Roding
The Roding flows south west towards the Thames.
Two streams meet here, one from the east and one from the south to a form a tributary to the Roding flowing north


TL 58 08
Post to the west Fyfield - 57 08
Post to the north Birds Green 58 09
Post to the east Willingale 59 08



Millers Green Road
Blowers. House made up of old cottages, early 17th. Iy is Timber framed with a thatched roof.
Charley Farm. House, timber framed 1600 with black weather board
Hill Farm
Hill Farm Cottage. late 14th timber framed house. There is an old front door used in an in outbuilding with a semi-circular hood and scalloped shell.
Hill House. 17th house with a, timber frame
Hydes. 16 th house, timber framed
Millers Green Cottage. Early 17th timber framed house with thatched roof. This was a small open hall house with a extension
Millers Green Hall. early 15th timber framed house. The old part is one storey with attics but there is a 20th two storey extension behind.
Gang Bridge over the Roding

Willingale Road
Alders Farm

Wednesday, 1 June 2011

Thames Tributary Roding - Bird's Green

Thames Tributary Roding
The Roding continues to flow south and is joined by a tributary from the west and one from the south.

TL 58676 08831

Country side area dominated by commercial fishing lakes


Post to the west - Beauchamp Roding
Post to the south - Millers' Green
Post to the north - Beauchamp Roding

Bird’s Green

Bird's Green, a hamlet partly in the parish of Willingale Doe
Tile House Farm. Birds Green Carp Fishery – Top Lake, Bottom Lake, Bridge Lake and a Tackle Shop.
Thatched Cottage. 17th timber framed cottage with thatched roof and modern thatched extension. This is an old open hall house which can be demonstrated by sooted timbers and an inserted 17 chimney.
'Two Swans’. An old pub, now a house but it was a farm-house until the middle 19th. It is a 17th timber-framed house refronted in brown brick.
Shallow Bridge, over the Roding. This was a county maintained bridge from 1654 but later responsibility was assigned to the local parish of Willingale Doe
Diggins Farm

Sources
Birds Green Fishing Lakes. Wen site
British Listed Buildings. Web site
Pevsner and Cherry. Essex


Thames Tributary – tributary stream to River Roding. - Wardens Hall

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to River Roding.
The stream flows northwards to the Roding


TL 58 07

Post to the north Willingale 59 08
Post to the south Norton Heath Road 

Fyfield Road
Wardens Hall. Farmhouse, built early 18th in pale red brick Moated site. Said to have been built for Sir John Slater, died 1740, a Lord Mayor of London. It was the manor house for Willingale Doe.
Farm buildings. Livestock buildings, granary, barn and waggon shed, engine house all late 18th and early C19. They are round three sides of a court of facing the main front of the hall.
Air force remains – some of the service sites for Chipping Ongar air field remain nearby. Some have been removed and housing put on the site.
Concrete roads to the south are the runways and perimeter roads of the Chipping Ongar, Willingale Airfield.

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to River Roding. Norton Heath Road

Thames Tributary – tributary stream to River Roding.
The stream rises in this area and flows northwards to the Roding


TL 59 06
Post to the north Warden's Hall 59 07
Post to the south Norton Mandeville 59 05



Norton Heath Road
Hodgkin’s Farm
Rockhills Farm
Mill Lane Riding School


Path to Spains Hall Road
Semi derelict corrugated iron air force building.

RAF Chipping Ongar
The airfield was sited in an area to the west of Willingale Lane. It was a an RAF Second World War airfield opened in 1943 and used as a base for bombers. It was also a base for the United States Army Air Force. It was closed in 1959 having been kept as a reserve airfield

Willingale Road
Offin’s Cottages. Late 16th timber framed and plastered

Thames Tributary- Tributary stream to the River Roding - Willingale

Thames Tributary- Tributary stream to the River Roding
The stream flows south west towards the Roding


TL 59 08
Post to the west Millers Green- 58 08
Post to the north Dukes Lane 59 08
Post to the east Shellow Bowells 60 08
Post to the south Willingale 59 07

Dukes Lane
Dukes Farmhouse. The house early 15th with later additions. It is middle Timber framed and in an H plan house with jettied wings. The east wing is the earliest build probably 1400 .with traces of 17th painting. There is a 17th stair tower at the back with some bits of contemporary handrail. Remains of probable moat.
Dukes Cottage. This is a late medieval open hall house, timber framed with black weatherboarding.

Fyfield Road
Warden’s Hall entrance. There is an old corrugated iron airfield structure near the entrance
Sewage works. Built during the Second World War to service Willingale Airfield.
Maltsters Arms. 19th pub recently used as a restaurant and now housing
House with sundials, sun fire insurance mark and clock
Telephone box.

The Village
Village Hall
Old Rectory and Glebe House. House of 1800 Probably by John Johnson in gault and red brick. Former moated site.
Cleminsons Charity Almshouses. An old house from the 17th timber framed in the southern part with wings at each end.
School. Now housing.
Bell Inn. 16th timber framed building. Now housing.
Churchyard shared by churches of two parishes: Willingale Doe and Willingale Spain. A gateway marks the parish boundary
St.Andrew. Parish church of Willingale Spain in the same churchyard as St.Christopher’s. St.Andrew is the older with a 12th nave and many later additions. It is in flint rubble, freestone and pudding stone with clunch and some Roman brick. There is a weather boarded bell chamber with a weather boarded spire and a 19th white weather boarded porch on south. Only now used on special occasions
St.Christopher parish church of Willingale Doe, restored in 1853 but used as the main parish church for the village. It is originally 14th but may have Saxon origins.

Watery Lane
A track, constantly flooded, alongside the stream.

Thames Tributary- Tributary stream to the River Roding -Dukes Lane

Thames Tributary- Tributary stream to the River Roding
The stream rises in this area and flows west towards the Roding.


Rural area

Post to the north Berners Roding
Post to the west Birds Green
Post to the east Shellow
Post to the south Willingale

Dukes Lane

Sources